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◈ 윤치호일기 (1893년) ◈

◇ 2월 ◇

해설목차  1권  2권 3권  4권  5권  6권  7권  8권  9권  10권  11권  12권  윤치호

1. 2월 2일

1
2nd. Thursday. Conyers.
 
2
In response to a call from Rev. Dillard, the Methodist pastor of Conyers, I left Oxford by the 4 p.m. uptrain for the former town. About 20 minutes' ride and I was there. Found Bro. Dixon a cordial and business-like man. He had been engaged in a series of services for the few nights past to arouse missionary interest and he wanted me to address his people from my stand-point of view.
3
Mrs. Dixon is a charming lady―like most of the wives of Methodist preachers. Miss Bessie Denham, from Eatenton on a visit to Bro. and Mrs. Dixon, fascinated me by her sweetness of face and of manner.
4
Had a large audience. Mrs. Perry, a teacher in the Conyers Institute read a paper carefully prepared, though some of her remarks on the condition of heathen women and men were rather too severe My address was well received.
5
Bro. Dixon's children are all smart and sweet. At the supper table Bro. Dixon said to Annie-Zu "Honey, I have saved the drum stick for Mamma tonight". "Papa" innocently replied or rather asked the little girl of about 5 "Doesn't the chicken go on two legs?"
6
Miss Bessie told me that the breast-bone of a chicken is called a "pull-bone" used by girls to hang over the door and that the first boy who passes under it becomes the sweetheart of the girl. She also told me that swallowing a chicken's heart whole makes one pretty. She must have swallowed several.
7
An Englishman after a long stay in the South went home. A lady asked him if he had seen her cousin in the South. "What part of the South does he live in?" inquired the gentleman. "He lives in Brazil", she replied. This fact confirms the amusing statement that during the American civil war the English boldly affirmed that the Mississippi flowed east west thus dividing the contending states into the Northern and the Southern halves. Funny as this seems a knowledge in the world's geography of any degree of accuracy is by no means common. Bro. Jed Speer thinks the Danube flows into Holland. I have met with very few who know where Corea is. A Chattanooga paper once put it away down among the Polynesian islands.
8
Dr. Candler some days ago, in commenting on the uselessness of burdening the mind with unimportant details, said with a degree of pride that he didn't know not only how long the Yangtsu River is but also which way it runs! This may do for the Doctor who is great in spite, and not on account of such an ignorance; but it will never do for an ordinary man.
 

2. 2월 3일

1
3rd. Friday. Conyers; Oxford.
 
2
A rather gloomy day. After breakfast at 8, Miss Bessie and I went up to Conyers Institute where I was invited to give a short talk on Corea to the students.
3
Conyers is said to have about 1,500 people. It is a much better town than I thought of. The Methodists of the town have a good church. Dr. Anderson went to China while the pastor of this charge.
4
The hospitality of Bro. and Mrs. D. and the charms of Miss Bessie made my visit very pleasant. Left Conyers by the 9 a.m. down train.
 

3. 2월 5일

1
5th. Sunday. A gloomy and chilly and sickly day.
 
2
Felt so lonesome! My head seemed like going to congeal from want of cheer and warmth. After the S.S. took a walk as far as to the Fall. Then called on Mrs. Nettie Candler. Ah! she is a benediction. The influence of kind hearted women is almost magic on me. Dr. Anderson, the new P.E. of the Oxford District preached twice. His voice and gesture most forcibly aroused my recollections of my first visit to La Grange.
3
Wrote to Miss Issie and Mrs. McClure.
4
Dr. Anderson is an old fashioned, therefore, a good fashioned Methodist preacher not given to emotions. He said that he would go to San Francisco and pay both ways to see a man who has faith in God.
 

4. 2월 9일

1
9th. Friday.
 
2
Last Wednesday was the only pretty day in this week. The rest all cloudy and biting cold as Thursday or unpleasantly warm as today.
3
1. At 7:30 p.m. Dr. Northrop of Conn. gave a lecture on Village Improvements. On the whole it was dry, though in some respects, profitable. He began with remarks on the great fact that the rural life is the source of real men and that city-bred folks are usually of no account. Then he dwelt on the beneficient effect of trees and flowers on body and mind and morals. He showed the good work that has been and is being done by Improvement Associations in the North and exhorted the students to plant as many trees and flowers as they can. "I have written many verses on trees," said he, but the best poems I ever wrote are the trees I have planted". Black walnut trees and Japanese ivy he suggested to be very good plants to cultivate among others.
4
At the end of the talk Dr. Candler said that he would give a ten-dollar prize to anybody who might put out the greatest area of grass along the street on which the church, the President's home and other respectable residences stand; a ten-dollar prize to any who might plant the largest number of Japanese ivy slips against the college-buildings; and another prize of the same value who might plant the largest number of flowers on the campus. The grass setters are to report to the street commissioner of the town of Oxford; the ivy competitors to a committee composed of Prof.'s Stone, Bonnell, and Bradley; while three ladies, Misses Lynn Br., Maggie M. and Nannie McInt., are to decide who deserves the flower-prize.
5
2. In his talks on different subjects in the class-room, Dr. Candler most justly and unsparingly condemn and denounce the worship of ever-changing fads in the name of fashion and taste; the craze after silly and moonshiny music, paintings, sculptures and ephemeral literature in the name of art; the whine and sanctimonious cants in which some indulge in the name of religion. "Find out what sort of cut and style suit you most comfortably, then stick to it always never minding the change of fashions dictated by tailors. Build your houses in an architecture most suitable to your climate. Let alone any production of any art that the common sense of common people does not priase; for their judgment is more sound than that of an eccentric critic. Don't ask a man suffering from toothache or a liver-trouble how he feels or if he feels accepted with God or any such sanctimonious stuffs. Feeling good or bad is no religion. It is the right direction of the will."
6
3. Brooks, a Senior, is one of the meanest boys in the college. He swears like a trooper and cheats in the class room without the least compunction. I think he is capable of any degree of meanness of any sorts. How nice and genteel he looks!
7
4. Bell picks his teeth all day long: not that there is anything to pick but that somebody else does so! He takes out pieces of meat half chewed and leaves them on the plate: not that they are tough, but that somebody else does so! Makes me sick!
 

5. 2월 11일

1
11th. Saturday. Rained most of the a.m. Cloudy all the day.
 
2
At 10 a.m. Dr. Northrop gave a lecture on the cultivation of memory.
3
1. The mnemonic system is a humbug.
4
2. Your mind is measured not by what it holds but by what it digests.
5
3. Memory changes its character with the age. In youth it is circumstantial; in maturity it is philosophic. Hence supply the mind with facts and figures in your early manhood.
6
4. Conversation is an index to the character of an individual or of a nation. Here the Dr. brought down the house by relating two instances in which some young ladies betrayed their limited acquaintance with the "King's English". One was that when a lady was awestruck in the presence of the majestic Niagara she vented her conception of the grandeur in the exclamation "O how pretty!" The other instance was that some young ladies applied the adjective "splendid" to everything they saw.
 
7
Ten hints for the Cultivation of Memory.
8
1. Right use of the senses especially of the eye. "Open your eyes!" The clearness of one's conception depends on the vividness of his perception.
9
2. Interest―feeling. Joy lubricates memory as sorrow clogs it. Intellect sees nature; sensibility admires her.
10
3. Curiosity
11
4. Attention―This is difficult but more important. Don't look out a word twice in the dictionary―every ten minutes.
12
5. Power of will. Will is the meter of manhood. He made the audience repeat after him in concert the maxim "A perfectly educated character is little else than a perfectly educated will." "Very good," shouted the old gentleman when the audience got through repeating it, and pointing at Mr. Ulla Hardman who sat in the front seat, he said "Am glad to see even this dear little boy repeat it so well!" The joke was a success. The cheers were deafening.
13
6. Do tough work without (1) flinching. (2) shirking, (3) grumbling, (4) bragging. Intense study is healthy, making the circulation rapid and vigorous. Languid study is damaging to the body and mind. Many a student waste more energy in shirking that doing a duty. Then he gave a piece of sanitary advice. "Sit up" He made Ben Freeman to sit on the platform on his heels in the Japanese fashion to show how injurious stooping is to the health. He said that 9/10 of the death among the Japanese students under his observation was due to pulmonary trouble caused by the vicious habit of sitting on heels.
14
7. Task your memory by storing up in it the gems of thoughts found in literature.
15
8. Trust your memory. Repeat what you read or saw or heard to others. If nobody will hear you, talk to a stone or a cow. Study rapid reading. You can't read rapid and move your lips.
16
9. Draw objects from memory.
17
10. By associating the objects of your perception with the place, time, and circumstances."
 
18
The lecture was a most important one to me.
19
Dr. Northrup said that the robust health which he enjoys at the advanced age of three scores and fifteen is due to the deep and full abdominal breathing he has practised from his college days. For an old of his age he looks remarkably young.
20
Bro. Jed Speer, a good natured man, is perhaps the dullest boy in the school. He ever studies but never learns. From 12 M. today―I don't know how many hours before this―he went to work three algebra examples until 4 p.m. I finished the examples between this and 6 which is, by the way, a sad commentary on my mathematical power. With the help of my solutions he didn't, even then, understand the process. He quit working at these three when the clock struck 10:30. Nearly 10 hours toil over 3 easy examples.
21
Bell rooms with Jed and they play the monkey and then parrot "without ceasing."
 

6. 2월 12일

1
12th. Sunday. Rained day and night.
 
2
Prof. Dickey preached twice. Notwithstanding the bad rain and worse mud tonight a surprisingly large number of boys were out. This bespeaks well of the discipline and the boys. While the compulsory attendance to the church services is subject to criticisms that it does not make anybody religious and all that, yet it disciplines and habiutates a boy to regularity in church-going. I know I was very lax in this respect while in Vanderbilt.
3
Prof. Dickey gave an excellent sermon on the sad folly of beginning a tower without counting the cost and of leaving it unfinished.
4
I wish I hade someone to love me!
5
Jed "I'd give a dollar if anyone should tell me how to get rid of my corn."
6
Dick Blanton "Give me the dollar: I will tell you."
7
Jed "Cousin, you are a clever fellow. I know you will tell me without the dollar." This illustrates the spirit of some men who say that they would do so and so if such and such conditions were given them. But the conditions given they would not do so and so.
8
An article by Dr. Cyrus Hamlin on Bulgaria in the Review of this month is an intensely interesting piece. The patriotism and national spirit the Bulgarians displayed for independence against Russia stirred up my blood as if I were one of them. The political situation of Bulgaria is very much like that of Corea.
9
The great powers of the world, European or American, will not help a foreign patriot because he is a patriot. Kossuth, the Hungarian patriot, was disappointed by the English whose help he had expected. The Polish partriots appealed to the English in vain. The Finians, the Irish patriots, found themselves deceived in their expected assistance from the United States. The Japanese should not be blamed for not helping Kim O Kiun in 1884. No! No! No! Time hasn't come yet when one nation shall rise up in its strength to help the weak against the oppressor for the sake of justice and freedom.
10
Read a letter in the Review by Mrs. Charlotte O. Van Cleve giving the story of two Chinese girls in the Mission Home in San Francisco. Was so forcibly touched by the Christ-like act the lady did for them that I dropped her a word or two expressing my grateful appreciation.
 

7. 2월 13일

1
13th. Monday. Cloudy a.m.―cold―Sunny evening.
 
2
Received this week's Advocate. Mrs. Hoss sends the Advocate every week addressed by her dear self. It is this―her handwriting―that thrills me with delight and joy every time I receive the paper.
3
Two spoiled children in a house is "confusion worse confounded." One of them is enough to "chase a thousand" and two, to "put ten thousand to flight" by their whinnings and cryings. O, Lottie and Luddie, you are mighty bad!
4
Suffered from a bad cold all the day. Worse in the night.
5
Am tired of the text-books. Five months more with them!
6
Everybody loves far less than desires to be loved. Demand is greater than supply. Hence love is so dear.
 

8. 2월 14일

1
14th. Tuesday. Gloomy day.
 
2
Took a short walk with Bro. Jed after the school. On my way home called on Mrs. N.C.
3
Today being the Valentine Day, Mrs. N.C. got a "valentine" from Cartersvile. In the envelope she found enclosed a caricature representing a wife picking her husband's pocket. It was a good joke.
4
Unexpectedly to me "sister" sent me a very pretty valentine card. Heaven bless her!
 

9. 2월 15일

1
15th. Wednesday.
 
2
Last night after a needed nap, got up at 11 and studied until 2:30 a.m. today. Answered "sister" thanking her for her kind remembrance.
3
Rained most of the day. There was a nice little crowd in the prayer meeting the mud and rain notwithstanding. Prof. Bradley led the service. Nath in his talk tonight said. "I would count it happy to die under some tree surrounded by heathens telling them the love of Christ." If anybody ever means what he says Nath does.
4
I have done my mind a great injury and injustice by letting the habit of inattention grow. Still my will power hasn't been much impaired. I can and I ought to and I will from this on cultivate the habit of attentiveness in hearing or reading.
 

10. 2월 17일

1
17th. Friday. Gloomy most of the day. Sunshine late p.m.
 
2
Took a walk to and in the cemetery.
3
The February debate came off tonight. The question was that the colonization of Negroes is beneficial to both races. The Fews had the affirmative therefore the weaker side. The substance of their arguments:
4
1. As the Negro advances in education he aspires to the political and social privileges enjoyed by the white.
5
2. To deny him these privileges would be an injustice while to grant them the Anglo-Saxon would not.
6
3. Having educated and christianized the Negro he ought to be placed in a country where he may strike out on a carrier of independence without the domination of white superiority.
7
4. The best interest of the white demands that his progress shall not be hampered by the presence of an inferior race.
8
5. The Negro must go.
 
9
The Phi Gammas maintained:
10
1. That the Negro came to this country from no fault of his own.
11
2. He has been an invaluable aid to the cultivation of the Southern soil.
12
3. The Negro race has never shown itself capable of self-government. The best interest of the African is the protection and guidance of a superior race.
13
5. The expenses would be immense for any colonization scheme.
14
6. The Negro would not go.
15
7. If he does go who will till the land? His substitute would be a Russian annihilist, or a German anarchist or an Italian assassin.
 
16
Professor Peed who presided the debate gave his decision in favor of the negative as a sensible man should. Covington, a Freshman Phi Gamma, made the best speech.
17
A few remarks on the Negro now and then heard:
18
A lady down in So. Ga. hearing Negros singing in a service, "God be with you till we meet again", said "Oh Lau! had I known niggers would sing that hymn, I would not have sung it some time ago".
19
Mrs. N.C. "I would not be a farmer for anything with the free Negro labor."
20
"It is perfectly dreadful" said Mrs. Cantrel, "that niggers in Atlanta dress finer than many a white folk."
21
To me a tremendous and interesting fact is that 10 millions of Africans through circumstances beyond their control, have come in possession of one of the richest and noblest languages in the world-the English. Perhaps they have been amply paid, as a race, for their servitude in this one invaluable gift.
22
The Negro will stay here. The best elements of Americans say so.
 

11. 2월 18일

1
18th. Saturday. A cool but bright day.
 
2
Was surprised to learn that Bell had a serious trouble with Oglesby last night. The acc't runs: Last night, while Tom Shephard was speaking, Bell reached the Phi Gamma Hall. On the portico Oglesby met him and poking his finger at Bell said, "You dirty Chinaman, what are doing here?" To which Bell replied, "What do you insult me for every time you see me? You act like a fool." Then Oglesby slapped him and knocked his spects off. Before Bell could return the compliment Oglesby kicked him At this stage several boys separated them.
3
1. Oglesby is one of the notorious gang-of-four in the College, the rest being Baxtrum, Gordon Hyles, C.M. Dart. They inhabit the cottage on the back-yard of Mrs. Cawley. By the way I have never seen a good boy from that den. Oglesby is one of the vilest, meanest, dirtiest wrethes I ever saw―Baxtrum threatened Bell not to report the affair to Dr. Candler.
4
2. Bell talks big; but he loses himself in fear and trembling when a fellow presents a defiant front. I knew him do so when, in A.C.C., a Japanese pulled him out of the room by the tail for a trivial offence. Bell proved himself no hardier today than he did in '88. He is actually scared to death by the threatenings of Oglesby and Baxtrum and Co.
5
3. The vast majority of the students condemn Oglesby, Nath, Hoil, Mann, Greer, Shipp, Wiggins, Homer Bush, Palmer and the rest of the best elements of the College are determined to set the thing right.
6
4. I reported the matter to Dr. Candler. He was hot over the outrage.
7
5. The indignation manifested by the students bespeaks well of the character of the College.
 
8
Took supper at Mrs. N.C.'s. I went to see her twice during the day but did not meet her. Saw her the third time I went there: I could not study or compose my mind without taking in some of her reviving sunshine.
9
Whatever unpleasant feelings I might have entertained against Bell for his would-be-American airs, his trouble brought on by no fault of his own, enlists my full sympathy. He shall find in me no lukwarm defender of his cause.
10
Bell believes with me in the exclusion of low-down Chinese from America.
11
Mrs. N.C. got a laugh out of me by making me pronounce the word "mad" backward. Mrs. Cartright once got me into a similar fix by making me put accent on the second syllable of Adam.
 

12. 2월 19일

1
19th. Sunday. A bright day―rather cold.
 
2
Rev. Mood preached in the morning.
3
At the invitation of Bro. Kendal took dinner in M. Hall. Bro. Palmer gives fine board.
4
After S.S. took a walk with Tom Shephard, Stipe and John Candler. Went as far as to Mr. George Stone's sawmill.
 
5
Dr. Candler preached a very fine sermon in the evening worship. He said:
6
1. Courage is the power to hazard a lower for a higher interest. The most important element in a true courage is faith in higher things.
7
2. Courage is unselfishness. Every fear has its root in selfishness.
8
3. Courage is calm and cool expressing itself in solid nouns and plain verbs. Adjectives are not the language for bravery.
9
4. None of us is so small that the world would not try to conform him to its maxims; or so great that it would not try to control. A real man is subject to neither.
10
5. Conviction is courage; but prejudice is not conviction: therefore prejudice is not courage.
11
6. Have you a conviction. Then dismiss any idea of comfort.
 
12
In the last China Mission Conference, a resolution was passed by virtue of which a native preacher, of full connection, receives6.00 a month if he be single, and8.00 if married. Bell is indignant at the resolution. I don't blame him. Eight dollars a month for a married man! Hardly enough for support. Yet higher salaries may be not only beyond the ability of the Mission but also a temptation to men of loaves and fishes.
13
Here is therefore one of the greatest and most urgent arguments for self-support. As long as the native ministry looks to a foreign board for maintenance one of two evils will be inevitable; viz., hardfeelings and grumbling in case of low pay or temptation to worldly men in case of lucrative salary.
14
There was a time when the most enlightened nation of this age was as low-down as the Coreans; and there may come a time when the Coreans shall be as enlightened as any people. This is one comfort at least. Christianity is the salvation and hope of Corea.
 

13. 2월 20일

1
20th. Monday.
 
2
After the chapel this evening, the boys had a college meetings in which resolutions were passed to request the Faculty to expel Oglesby.
 

14. 2월 22일

1
22nd. Wednesday.
 
2
A holiday on accout of this being Washington's birthday.
3
Got up at 5:30 a.m. With a large part of the Senior Class went to ... on the accommodation. From there we walked through mud and wood over hills and creeks about 3 miles to reach Mt. Tabor. The walk was much enjoyed, especially the crossing of a wide creek―a tributary to the Yellow River―on a log bridge, the most primitive I have seen in this country.
4
Reached Mt. Tabor, a small country church at 8:30. Practiced the Senior song until 11 a.m. Then footed home. Was so tired that I had to take a nap dinner.
 

15. 2월 24일

1
24th. Thursday.
 
2
Busted in a Geometry examination. A pretty moon light night.
3
The Juniors did steal the Senior song, the cautions and precautions of the Seniors notwithstanding. The Juniors with lanterns, fire-crackers, flambeans and fidoles organized a procession from the ball-ground. When I heard them sing, though in a wrong tune, the precise words of the Senior song, my heart sank within me against all my efforts. All the Seniors were much hacked.
4
Jim Mann, Whop Harris, Hom Bush were appointed to write a new song. A dozen or so of Seniors were ordered to guard the boys―in Mrs. Pattilo's―while the song was being composed.
 
5
EMORY COLLEGE
6
OXFORD, GEORGIA
7
ARBOR DAY OF CLASS '93
8
Friday, February 24, 1893
9
__________________________
10
PROGRAMME
11
1. PRAYER, By Dr. W.A. Candler.
12
2. SPEECH, By Dux, W.B. Lee, Jr. Loan Fund Association
13
3. CLASS HISTORY, By T.D. Ellis.
14
4. CLASS POEM, By H.F. Harris.
15
5. CLASS PROPHECY, By W.P. King.
16
6. ADDRESS, By Prof. J.E. Dickey.
17
7. CLASS SONG, By the Class.
18
8. PRAYER, By Chaplain, R.E. Bradley.
19
9. PLANTING OF TREE.
20
10. INVOCATION, By the Poet.
 
21
BENEDICTION
22
By Dr. Candler
 
23
The largest class ever graduated in a Georgian College.
24
Put most of the morning in Algebra.
25
A beautiful day for the class-exercises. The program began at 2 p.m. Bill Lee's address on the object and benefits of the Loan Fund Association of Emory College was remarkably practical and thoughful, free from rhetorical flourishes and superfluous adjectives. He closed the speech by presenting to the College through its president an envelope containing the promisory notes of the class '93 amounting to2,500.
26
Then followed History, the Poem, the Prophecy in order. All good-better than those of the Class '92.
 
27
ARBOR DAY
28
THE CLASS OF '93
29
REQUEST THE HONOR OF YOUR
30
PRESENCE AT THEIR TREE PLANTING
31
FRIDAY AFTERNOON, FEBRUARY
32
24th AT TWO O'CLOCK
33
EMORY COLLEGE, OXFORD GA.
 
34
1. Bill―of true metal.
35
2. Bond―honest and faithful.
36
3. Bryan―kind and strong.
37
4. Ellis―ambitious and able to lead.
38
5. Eakes―true to duties of the society.
39
6. Harris-thoughtful under thoughtless appearance.
40
7. Hearn―a man of God.
41
8. McDonnell―amiable and conscientious.
42
9. McCullough―slow, but sure in grabbing at gains.
43
10. McNair―a scholar.
44
11. Jim Mann―a soul of honor.
45
12. Miller―a loveable character.
46
13. Pasco―a "Sister" in pants.
47
14. Shipp―dashing but shallow.
48
15. Colquitt―a perfect gentleman.
49
16. Stephens―as neat as a girl, as businesslike as Brockman.
50
17. Jones―kind, quiet, conscientious.
51
18. King―Very smart, not very strong.
 
52
When Professor Dickey rose, it was already 5 minutes after 5 p.m. His address on the growth of civilization was good; but the audience was too tired to appreciate it as much as they would otherwise have done.
53
The class-song was very imperfectly rendered, the boys having had no time to master the music.
54
From the church the classes and the general audience marched to the campus. The classes formed a circle around the young elm; and after Whop Harris had read an invocation, each of the faculty and of the Seniors put a shovel of dirt around the tree. With a benediction by Dr. Candler, the exercise was closed.
55
Munro wanted this morning to borrow any spects simply for the purpose of looking smart!
 

16. 2월 25일

1
25th. Saturday. A pretty day and a prettier night.
 
2
This morning witnessed the final settlement of the measure introduced by Tom Ellis 3 weeks ago begging the society to increase the number of editors of the Phenix to six. The motion had aroused a vigorous opposition and ill feeling before it death. The arguments for it were:
3
1. We want a larger paper in pamphlet form.
4
2. This enlargement means more work and more work requires more men.
5
3. Unless there be an increase of force, the paper has to be returned to the original size of 8 pages.
 
6
The opposition said:
7
1. The paper of 12 pages as it now stands has space enough for all the literary talents of the school.
8
2. Two more editors on the staff will produce discord and quarrel among the officers of the paper.
9
3. It is a dangerous venture.
10
I was for the measure.
11
Took supper in Andrew Hall and stayed until after the prayer meeting.
 

17. 2월 26일

1
26th. Sunday. Cloudy and chilly most of the day.
 
2
Had a poor rest last night. After the breakfast, I was going to fix up my room and read some, when Lottie came in uninvited and unwelcome plaguing me with her everlasting "give-me-some". So tormenting was she that I took to the woods. Walked from 8 to 10:30 a.m. Was too tired to enjoy Dr. Moore's sermon.
3
After the S.S. took a walk to the Fall with John Candler Supped at Mrs. Candler's. She is a pretty woman.
4
Am told many a lady took exception to Bill Kings "indelicate funs in his otherwise good prophecy―such as free coinage of gold," "sister Pasco's twain child", etc. Mrs. Moore is reported to have said that Bill Kings ought to be thrown in Dr. Candler's pond. By the way Mrs. Moore and Dr. Candler have always been at sixes and sevens. Dr. Candler said "When I meet her, I always do as when I see a fast train: I get out of the way".
5
Professor Bradley preached.
 

18. 2월 27일

1
27th. Monday. Rained most of the day. Thunders and hard rain in the night. Very cold.
 
2
Felt restless and petulant all the day. Had no mind to study.
3
At supper table―
4
Brother Berry "I hear Mr. Seales is going to get rockers for his boarders."
5
Bell "He ought not to do that."
6
T.H.Y. "Why?"
7
Bell "Cause a rocker makes a fellow lazy."
8
T.H.Y. "Bell let me tell you that there are boys in the College who use rockers and are as diligent as you who don't!"
 
9
Oh impudence! What has he to do with the ought-to's and ought-not-to's of other folks? If he has, can he prove that a rocker necessarily makes a boy lazy? If he can is he the man to talk about laziness?
10
Had to go to bed early.
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윤치호 일기 [제목]
 
윤치호(尹致昊) [저자]
 
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