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◈ 윤치호일기 (1893년) ◈

◇ 6월 ◇

해설목차  1권  2권  3권  4권  5권  6권 7권  8권  9권  10권  11권  12권  윤치호

1. 6월 2일

1
2nd. Friday.
 
2
After breakfast, went up to Andrew Hall to attend to Boland. Dysentery is an unpleasant disease for the sufferer and the attendant.
3
Received a letter from Dr. Allen to the effect that Brother Loehr calls for a relief and that I should make arrangement to return as soon as practicable. So after all I was not wrong in my decision.
4
1. One of the most sallent and beneficial effects of the education of American boys in the free intercourse with girls is the diffusion of passions. They are thus enabled to select their life-long mates without being impelled by narrow and blind affection for the first girl they come in sight of.
5
2. On a sensitive soul which produces or leaves the strongest impression, kindness or indignity? This is a hard problem. But to my mind, the latter hurts more than the former heals. Reasons for this phenomenon may be
6
(1) Somehow or other we expect kindnesses as a matter of course and insults or slights as something exceptional.
7
(2) Hence when we notice or receive any insult at the hand of those from whom we have been in the habit of receiving kindness and consideration, the cut goes deeper and smarter.
8
An example: A Sunday or two ago I and McLean stood with Mrs. Candler outside of her gate. She asked McLean to walk with her and when he refused she not only walked on but got rid of me with a trite excuse. I took the situation with as much grace or disgrace as I could manage. If she and I changed places, no doubt I might have done exactly as she did. Yet this did not prevent me from feeling the most exquisite pain and humiliation. I shall not be able for sometime to feel toward her the unalloyed affection as I once had. I am sorry this happened; for if there is anybody whom I wish to cherish unspotted love for, it is this noble woman. Hope time and distance will efface this unpleasant impression and leave the memories of her goodnesses alone.
9
A Corean with a delicate sensibility responsive to all slights and discrimination is like a beggar with an elegant taste.
 

2. 6월 3일

1
3rd. Saturday.
 
2
Up at a.m. In the company of Mrs. Berry, Brothers Rob Eaks, S. Hearn, Miss Ruth, Brother Coney, Miss Tommie, I left Covington depot at 6 a.m. for a picnic to the celebrated Stone Mt. The party swelled to about 40 persons by the addition of some members of Mt. Tabor and Shilo S.S.s. Reach Stone Mt. about 7:30. The morning was very misty and we actually spent the larger part of the a.m. in the cloud.
3
Had a hearty dinner for which the walk had prepared me. At 3 p.m. Brother H. and Mrs. Berry, Miss Tommie and myself, reascended the mountain and enjoyed the extensive views and cool breeze till 6. Came home on the accomodation.
4
1. For the first time in my life, I took a girl to a picnic.
5
2. The agility of the girls in climbing the steep rocky mountains was admirable. No wonder Americans are a strong race.
6
3. Mrs. Berry seemed to be altogether insensible to the fatigues of climbing up and down the mountain and of walking 4 or 5 miles on the R.R. bed. She manifested impatience kin to wrath when anybody spoke against going up the mountain more than once. A robust health in a woman is a lovable thing. But deliver me from a woman of such a coarse built that she doesn't feel tired after a walk on rocks which would pain a mule's legs.
7
4. The moral condition of the general run of Americans is healthy. Nowhere is this plainly seen more than in the unimpeached honor kept up in the most free and unwatched intercourse between men and women. It would be well-nigh impossible in Corea or Japan to leave two people of opposite sex in freedom and privacy without sin.
8
5. The woman who lives opposite to the place where we had our dinner, exacted money for a bucket of water from her well. An instance of stinginess well worth noting.
9
6. The Stone Mt. looks like a huge dome on one side. An extensive quarry is in operation and acres of the mountain sides are leveled with drills and hammers. Man is the lord of creation only in a civilized land.
10
7. The town of Stone Mt. is a handful of neat cottages scattered among groves. Looked down from the mountain the white washed homes here seen and there unseen among the trees appeared like white sails on a seat of blue water.
11
8. How difficult and almost impossible seemed the task of climbing up and down the rocky mountain, when contemplated from the base! But it proved comparatively an easy task to do so when we made up our mind to do it. Is there no moral here?
12
9. There are a number of impressions on the rock which I could easily imagine Into the prints of some known objects, such as a big foot, a spoon, a shoe. But the most stricking one was one near the top. It looked like the traditional shape of heart so fashionable in ornaments and paintings.
 

3. 6월 4일

1
4th. Sunday. A very hot day.
 
2
Rev. Bishop preached a fine sermon. Took dinner at Mr. W Griffin's. Met Mrs. Wilkinson, 'Donnie's' mother.
3
Waited on Boland from 3 to 6:30 p.m. Supped at Mrs. N.C.'s,
4
After supper as we sat on the porch, talking, Mrs. N.C. said "Mr. Yun, lately I have often thought of the sweet reunion of friends in heaven never to part nor to misunderstand each other. I haven't been understood by a great many people. My husband knows me, so do Mrs. Harris and my sister. But my mother has never understood me". Indeed!
5
Is it possible? What does that mean? A mother doesn't understand her child?
6
Her appreciation of my fanning made me wish 1 could spend the whole night in that pleasant task.
7
At 8:45 went up to Andrew Hall to sit up with Boland.
 

4. 6월 5일

1
5th. Monday. A hot day.
 
2
Couldn't sleep a whole hour last night. Dr. Evans is a poor physician. His connection with Bishop Haywood and the patronage of the leaving families in the village enable him to monopolize the cases in the town. He has been treating Boland for more than a week giving him world of medicine without any good result. Were I sick I would trust in the common sense and kindness of Mrs. N.C. rather than in the skill (?) of Dr. Evans.
3
Supped at Mrs. N.C.'s.
 

5. 6월 7일

1
7th. Wednesday. A cloudy but plessant day.
 
2
At 11 a.m. went down to the college chapel to attend the closing service of the year.
3
1. I feel almost dizzy at the rapidity with which the school year has sped. I stretch out my hand involuntarily to grasp something solid.
4
2. After the chapel, the class '93 decided to have a reunion in the year 1900 A.D.
5
This evening on the way to my room from Prof. Harris' 'I saw Miss Lilian Bonnell walking with Ch. Jarrel. No sooner she noticed me than she cast her eyes on the ground. It was a sight to see her talking with her eyes almost completely shut. Her cold-bloodedness made me shudder.
6
Attended the last Wednesday prayer meeting that I could attend. Dr. Candler gave a stirring talk on the verses 5-8 of the Chapter I of Second Peter. "Patience", said he, "is neither talking much nor talking less but the ability to suffer for duty."
7
It has been a perfect torture to one, the singing that they are carrying on in Mrs. Berry's room every night from 8 to 11. To much of anything is bad enough in itself. But Bell's presence in the racket enhances its unendurableness.
 

6. 6월 8일

1
8th. Thursday. A very breezy day.
 
2
In Berry's house it is next to impossibility to read. Since some evenings ago, Mrs. Berry called Tommie in (who was walking with me) to sing while Bell played, I don't like her(Mrs. B.'s) looks and attitude toward me, notwithstanding her profession of friendship. Then there is Tommie. I can't compose my mind when she is in Mrs. B.'s room and my mind is on her when she is by me; thus in either case I can't read or write within the reach of her voice. Lastly Bell makes the whole house sepulchral by his presence. So I made up my mind to stay away from these distractions as possible.
3
Spent the whole a.m. in Thom Shepherd's room in M.H. Read Carlyle's essay on Burns with the keenest appreciation. The writer attributes B.'s failure to his attempt to find happiness in circumstances, in favor, in friendship, in social recognition instead of in himself. Charlyle teaches that where war with neccessity ends, there contentment and peace begin. The wohle essay impressed me very much, disturbed as I have lately been by fruitless and foolish attempt to be happy in the affection of a girl who can never love me.
4
God help me to find freedom in necessity by being reconciled to it. Help me be contented with whatever lot I may see. I have too often looked to the smiles of friendship for happiness instead of to myself. Help me to comprehend "that for suffering and enduring there is no remedy but striving and doing".
5
There are three "F"s which we can never have by hunting after: viz. Fame, Favor, Fortune.
6
Received a kind letter from Mrs. McClure and answered at once.
7
Carlyle's style in his essay on Burns is as elegant and smooth as Macaulay's though in different way.
8
There are scores of boys in the school who profess love and friendship for me. How many of them will stay such were they to meet me in Corea hereafter? None unless it be Nath and Thom Shephers.
9
Spent the whole evening with Tommie.
 

7. 6월 9일

1
9th. Friday. A beautiful day.
 
2
Walked to and from Covington with Tommie in the morning. Read Macaulay in the p.m.
3
Had a second supper at Mrs. N.C.'s. All the trustees are fat and solid looking. It amused me to think whether they are fat because they are trustees or trustees because fat. May be neither. But if either I am inclined to think that they are trustees because. they are fat; for solid circumstances are a necessary qualification of a trustee while corpulence is a natural enough result of a successful career.
4
There were four of the trustees at the table. After the supper, incidentally Dr. Candler mentioned my school plan to them. They received the intimation in a way as might be expected from men of their situation and experience in silence too deep to pry into.
5
Attended the Sub-Fresh exhibition. Jim McClure declaimed remarkably well. I couldn't have been more solicitious for his success if he were my own brother. Shuptrim, however, got the medal. No doubt his kneepants helped a great deal.
6
The string band pleased me better than I feared (brass-band being my favorite) by reminding me of the Vandone orchestra on similar occasions in V.U.
 

8. 6월 11일

1
11st. Sunday.
 
2
Went to rest last night from 9.
3
After breakfast called on Dr. Allen. His constant theme is dominion of man over nature. Went up to Dr. Candler to see Dr. Hoss whom to meet has been the pleasure of the commencememt to me. Found him alone in Dr. Candler's office. He held my hand in his and said "Will you forget us when you go back to the East?" "No Sir" answered I, "You are the last man I shall forget!" I could scarcely forbear tears from filling my eyes.
4
I told Dr. Hoss the way in which I have decided to use the money on hand in regard to the school plan. He received the information pretty much as he might have listened to a child planning for a toy.
5
At 10:30 a.m. Dr. Hoss preached a plain, wholesome, gospel sermon, which touched every heart that had any responsiveness to religious sentiments. His text was the 15th verse of St. JohnXIV. Dined in M. Hall.
6
Dr. Haygood preached at 3:30 p.m. His sermon was short, simple, sincere.
7
Tommie, dear Tommie, went home this evening. Was sorry to part with her. But in one sense glad in that my mind could be more at ease in her absence. This flower had rested on her breast before she gave it to me.
8
Supped at Miss Lynn Branham's. At 8 Rev. Jarrel of Savanah addressed young preachers. There were about 21 in the reserved seats, besides two in the choir. I kept my usual seat in the right wing. The sermon started off all right but left the crowd rather disappointed; it didn't have any application.
9
After the service Dr. Candler asked me why I didn't sit with the young preachers. On my telling him that I have never been licensed the Dr. exclaimed "You are a most hard headed fellow I ever saw". The fact is I don't feel like a preacher.
10
In his sermon this morning Dr. Hoss said "Theologians are a class of gentlemen for whom I have a profound but a somewhat distant respect." This brought a ripple of smile over Dr. Candler's face.
11
Dr. Allen said that he calls some people in this country fools, but not the Chinese. "For" said he, "a fool is one who knows what is truth and refuses to accept it".
 

9. 6월 12일

1
12nd. Monday. A very hot day.
 
2
At 10:30 a.m. went down to the depot with Dr. Hoss. Needless to say that I was grieved to part with that beloved friend.
3
Bell left Oxford for his summer work at 3:30 p.m. I was ten times more moved in bidding him good-bye than I had dreamed.
4
The champion debate came off at 8:30. It proved exactly what I had expected; prejudice on one side and sentiment on the other―the question being the exclusion of all Chinese men from America except students.
5
The Phi Gammas upholding the negative side appealed most to the pride and racial prejudice of the audience. They regaled the people with the usual eulogy on America and Americans as the home of the free etc, God fearing, liberty loving people etc. They said "American civilization" 18 times. Shipp was singularly bitter and spared no adjective to vilify the Chinese. He denounced them as "pernicious," "vile", "wicked", "degrading," "allen", "heathenish", "filthy", "immoral" etc. "Tell me rather" said he "to open the gates of the vilest dungeon and hug to my bosom the blackest criminal of the darkest deeds than to embrace these degraded wicked people(Chinese) ". The audience cheered every hit that tickled their prejudice while the appeals to justice and right by the Fews were received with the utmost coldness, thus demonstrating most conclusively that they are of a God fearing Christian nation.
6
The P.G.'s won the question. This was what I had looked for. Truth is, there is no use of arguing such questions on basis of justice, right and religion. In all international and interracial dealings and questions given might you have right.
7
The absurdity of appealing to the conscience of the Americans when their self-interest is involved in an interracial matter or when their gold is touched. Why the millions of different churches with the legislature on their side have just barely been able to shut the W. Fair on Sundays. Nay, the Fair was kept open two Sundays a few weeks ago; and if the greedy managers so please they may yet defy the churches and throw the gates open on the Lord's day. Now if the aggressive power of evil is so strong as this in the face of millions of Christians who are unanimous in closing the Fair on Sundays, will you tell me that the faint and doubtful and halfhearted protest of a few conscientious people can keep a gain loving nation from violating the rights of a weaker nation or race?
8
The "Allen medal" for which Joe Bell, Bill King, Tom Ellis. Dick Breadley had written besides myself, was given me. It was an agreeable surprise. Miss Mary Allen, in her graceful way, congratulated me and pinned the medal for me. What a contrast between this genial young woman and the repulsive Miss Lilian B.!
9
As a result of the debate which gave an emphasis to the prejudice of the people, I expect some unpleasant and galling treatment in looks or in works or in acts or in all from the rougher element of the visitors etc. I have no means to make them understand that the Coreans are not subject to the exclusion bill. Well, I shall bear it as I have always done; not in bravadoism nor in fawning, but in silence.
 

10. 6월 13일

1
13rd. Tuesday.
 
2
The Junior speeches were remarkably fine. Rain didn't prevent the service.
3
At 4 p.m. the Alumni Association met. After election of officers for next year etc., Dr. Candler introduced a resolution to receive me as an alumnus. At the end of which I made a ten minute talk presenting the school scheme. When I got through Dr. J.F. Bonnell made some very complimentary remarks on my behalf. Bishop Haygood moved to insert into the resolution that whenever I should be able to return to Corea I should be invited to come to this country to canvass for the work there.
4
While I most thankfully appreciate the kind feelings and expections these noble men entertain for me I tremble that I might prove a truant to all these expectant friends. God help me. Let me work for God and man without bothering myself about results!
5
At 8 Dr. Allen delivered the alumni address on the relations between China and America. One of his strong assertions was that China could do without America but America could not do without China. He very finely compared himself to an engineer in an Arctic vessel who spends hours of energy to liquify ice in the boiler and who is blamed for producing no immediate result. "It requires 1000° to bring the ice to liquid state but 250° to reduce the latter to steam. The man who build fire and melt the ice bear the toil and burden of the work while he who gets up the steam reaps the applause. I may not have produced the steam and I may not live to see it, but my father knows I have heaped the coal and the fire is red-hot." The audience seemed to appreciate the speech.
 

11. 6월 14일

1
14th. Wedensday.
 
2
Wrote to Prof. W.B. Bonnell. Truly said I in connection with the medal I got "It is but a fair tribute to whom tribute is due to thank you for the medal. Whatever improvement I might have made in my knowledge in English, it has been built on the sure foundation you have laid for me."
3
From 9 a.m. till 1:35 p.m. the Senior or closing exercises occupied the hours. All the speeches were good. The thoughts and sentiments of the utterances were a sort of reflex of Dr. Candler's views, Bryan made a good and strong speech on the Irish Home Rule. He is one of the strongest and best hearted boys in the college.
4
Dr. Candler's address was fine.
5
He warned the boys against the dangers of ungodly politics, of women suffrage etc. After eulogizing the domestic virtues of the mother of Washington, the Dr. said "One woman like this is worth all the unsexed agitators from the day of Jezebel to the latest shrieker in the Women's Congress". It impressed me much when the Dr. said in his to me wonderfully sweet voice (when he is moved) "My boys stand by the Lord's day and His Word."
6
His farewell words at the close moved many of us to tears. God be with him and his!
7
Dined at Dr. Scomp's.
8
Bishop Fitzgerald addressed the literary societies on the need of man in the pulpit, in politics, in trade, in schools, in courts.
9
After supper called on Dr. and Mrs. Candler, Nath and others to bid them good-bye. Went to Prof. Stones and had the misfortune of meeting the unwelcome looks of Misses Lilian and Marian and their associates.
10
Life is pleasant. But when I contemplate the national humiliations and mortifications that have been and will be my lot to see―when, I, in every turn of life's way, meet with the lacerating looks and words and acts due to my national badge, I feel weary of life. I do not and shall not court or seek death, but if it were to come now in natural course I shall not regret to part with a world so unkind to any but the strong.
11
Wrote to dear sister.
12
Dr. Candler asked me what I thought of investing the200 in some interest yielding business. I told him to do with it as he deemed best.
 

12. 6월 15일

1
15th. Thursday. A cloudy and cool day.
 
2
Left Oxford at 9 a.m. Mrs. Ellen B. wept at our parting.
3
She gave me a silk handkerchief which she had used only once or twice. I appreciate the gift most cordially; for it indicates the sincerity of her friendship.
4
Reached Greensboro at 11:30 a.m. Mr. Merritt, Percy's cousin, and Mr. Young met me at the depot and took me out to the latter's home.
5
Found Percy Merritt considerably recovered from his long illness. He stays with Mr. Young, his brother-in-law. His mother, an excellent old lady, is with him. Mrs. Young is an intelligent and diligent housekeeper.
6
Wrote to Mrs. N.C. and Mrs. E.B.
7
This home, small but neat, located on a high ground is only a mile from the town. The woods, fields, cows and gardens have all the charms of real picturesqueness and quietude while the railroad close to the house connects the contended life of a farmer with the pulsations of the active world.
8
The tenderness with which the mother and the sister nurse Percy M. is a sight lovely to behold.
 

13. 6월 18일

1
18th. Sunday.
 
2
At 9:30 a.m. went to the Baptist Church, at the end of the S.S. service I gave a short talk. Mr. C.A. Davis Jr., the S.S Supt., is an active and stirring man. Keeps up the best S.S. in the town. Brother G., the Baptist pastor, preached.
3
Dined at Mrs. Armor's. She is one of the most enthusiastic Christian workers I ever saw. She has a "go" in her. She is an ardent admirer of Dr. Candler whom she calls the "ugliest best looking man." "Tell him" said she "go ahead and deliver us from woman suffrage for God, Home, and Country. We women have too much to do at home and in the church to be bothered with politics". Happy is the man who has a wife as this.
4
Talked to the Rosebud missionary society of the Methodist Church. Had a large crowd.
5
Supped with Brother and Mrs. Ansley. She is a charming and intellectual woman.
6
Greensboro is located in one of the most desirable regions in Ga. Bermudah grass flourishes. The town has a population not less than 1500. Many pretty girls.
7
It was told me that Mrs. Armor, Mrs. Ansley, Miss Gussie and a few other ladies run the church. A church could be in no better hands. The house which Mrs. Armor occupied was once the home of Miss Safford, a Presbyterian missionary who died in China some years ago.
8
Walked out to Mr. Young's.
9
Received a letter from Mrs. Ellen B. Errors in her orthography and grammar enhanced rather than lessened the value of her letter.
 

14. 6월 19일

1
19th. Monday.
 
2
At 7:30 a.m. left Greensboro for Union Point in a buggy with Mr. Young. They were delightful.
3
While the scarcity of books, the rustiness of a few pens, the dryness of the ink-bottle argued the probable lack of literary education in the family, the language and manner of Mrs. Young has the grace and polish of a cultured woman. Mr. Young is one of the most accommodating men I ever saw.
4
On our way I learned from Mr. Young:
5
1. That a piece of land in the immediate vicinity of a river or a stream is called the bottom land while it is the second bottom land a little further on.
6
2. Gray land is better than red soil for cotten. Corn is much easier to raise than cotton.
7
3. A farm hand is paid from 40 to 50¢ according whether he (or she) is fed or not. When picking time comes about 40¢ for hundred pds. A good negro could pick 300 lbs a day with strap behind him in slavery days. But now, being free, they pick scarcely over a 100 lbs.
8
Union Point is a brave little place. Reached Athens at 12. Had to wait until 5:30 p.m. in the G.C. and N. Depot. The ride between Athens and Elberton was in keeping with the miserable experience of the day―hot and dusty in a shanty hitched to a freight train―the benches full of beg-bugs of all sizes.
9
Rain hard as the train pulled in to the Elberton depot. Went straight to the parsonage. Found Rev. Wooten a goodnatured man. Two of his sisters keep house for him. One of them is good-looking but seems too heavy to move about. Among the first things she asked was my age.
10
Rained out.
11
(flower) These flowers from Mrs. Chedel.
 

15. 6월 20일

1
20th. Tuesday.
 
2
At the breakfast table (by no means very orderly) , Miss Wooten said to me with a complacent smile "More people will wonder at you when you return in citizen's clothes and civilized". Then she asked me which I thought the prettier, the American women or the Corean. On my telling her the Americans are she said "Our men are better looking too". I told her some of them are.
3
While these questions are all natural I could hardly have expected them from a woman of culture and sense. There are many natural enough questions which needn't be asked. Some people in their conceit in their superior civilization violate simple rules of courtesy which that superiority demands and say and do things to strangers that a heathen of ordinary politeness wouldn't
4
Called on Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Loehr the parents of Brother Geo. Loehr of China. Found them plain good religious folks worthy of such a son. Mrs. Chedel the oldest sister of Bro. Loehr favors him very much.
5
Met Jim Swift. He greeted me with his usual warmth. He was in his shirt sleeves going about actively for his business. Was glad to see him do so. He introduced me to his mother, an elegant woman. Jim insisted on my staying with him somedays; but of course I had to refuse.
6
Left Elberton at 11:15 a.m. for Anderson S.C. Had to wait 6 hours for the Savanah Valley train at the lonely depot of Calhoun Falls. While waiting wrote to Mrs. N.C., Mrs. Ellen B., Mrs. Young and dear Sister.
7
Left C.F. at 5:30 p.m. and reached Anderson at 7:30. Went to the parsonage. Brother Watson and family had gone to Asheville but Bro. Jones the S.S. Supt. kindly took charge of me. At Mrs. Key's boarding house, I met Ford, a Vanderbilter. Both of us were glad to see.
8
Had a fair audience.
9
Brother Wilson, the P.E., is a very sweet spirited gentleman. He took me to his home for the night.
10
Anderson is a pretty town of about 2,500 to 3,000. The Methodist have a good church though smaller than that of Elberton. The parsonage in Anderson is one of the finest I have seen in the South.
 

16. 6월 21일

1
21st. Wednesday. A pretty morning.
 
2
Mrs. Richardson, the mother in law of Brother Wilson, is an old lady of 75 years. Her faculties unimpaired. She has 6 children, 36 grand children and 14 great-grand children two of whom were born only last week.
3
Left Anderson at 11 for Seneca. A tedious ride. Got to the latter place at 1:30 p.m. Arthur Thompson, an Emory Soph, met me and brought me to the parsonage.
4
Brother Hutson is a handsome man. His wife is pretty, having a graceful figure and a pair of beautiful arms. She is a pet rather than a wife. It's pitty that fashion and vanity seem to have a greater sway over her than religion and character.
5
Had a ride in the evening. Brother Hutson, his wife, two little girls and myself. During the drive Brother Hutson manifested snappishness of temper that grieved me.
6
Had a good crowd. Only3.49.
 

17. 6월 23일

1
23rd. Friday.
 
2
At 8:40 a.m. Brother Hutson and I left Seneca in his buggy for Fort Hill, the seat of a new agricultural college and an experimental station. Two hours'ride brought us to the place. The college buildings were fast approaching completion. The main building is a magnificent affair containing recitation rooms, museum and a large chapel seating no less than 800. The dormitory has 160 or more rooms, steam heated and electric lighted. One room for four boys.
3
The college belongs to the state; but the site and the land for the experimental station were given by Mr. Clemson whose name the institution bears. The property once belonged to John C. Calhoun, the celebrated S.C. statesman.
4
The president elected last Wed. is a Methodist and the faculty is largely of that denomination.
5
Left Fort Hill or the Calhoun depot at 2 p.m. for Spartanburg. On the train met Dr. Foster Smith of V.U. and Bishop Dundan. Dr. Smith informed me that Dr. Jim Kirkland had been elected the chancellor, that Dr. Martin had resigned and that Prof. Brown is in hope of the Biblical Department.
6
Found Bro. Rogers and his wife a most loveable couple. Rested until 7:30. Had a rather small audience. Met Dr. Carlisle the president of Wofford College. To make connection at Blacksburg I had to leave Spartanburg in the midnight. Was sorry that I didn't have time to go over the buildings etc. of Wofford College and see more of Dr. J.H. Carlisle. Took in hastily the campus and the buildings of the college on my way to the depot.
 

18. 6월 24일

1
24th. Saturday. Blacksburg.
 
2
Left Spartanburg at 2 a.m. reached Blacksburg at 3. Went to the Merchant's Hotel. Slept until 7:30.
3
Blacksburg is a more important place than I thought. It has about 1,500 people. Electric light. Good houses. Fine water.
4
Left Blacksburg only at 4 p.m. for Shelby, N.C. Brother Thompson being temporarily away I was sent to Central Hotel kept by Mrs. Latham. A beautiful night.
5
Received a card from Mrs. N.C. and a letter from Bell. I simply devoured every word from dear N.C.
 

19. 6월 25일

1
25th. Sunday. Shelby, N.C.
 
2
After breakfast went to see Brother Thompson. The children's day exercises came off this morning. I gave a short talk.
3
I am simply sick of this lecturing business. The expenses so far have swallowed up most of the earnings. If things go no better I shall not only need religion (as Bro. Wooten said to me) but also something else to make the trip.
4
Chicago gained her point to have the Fair on Sundays. A most dishonest and dastardly act. Shame on the directors, shame on the papers, shame on the judges and above all shame on the people! What became of all the protest and petitions of religious bodies? Well, they were mere noise and paper. The ungodly directors knew this. They knew the power of money and the weakness of mere sentiment.
5
They asked for a handsome souvenir in return for Sunday closing. Their gain secured, they broke the contract. A splendid example of the strong avarice and dull conscience of the American nation.
 

20. 6월 26일

1
26th. Monday. Lincolnton.
 
2
Had a full house last night. Met Mrs. M.A. Wildman of Richmond. She introduced herself to me as a cousin of Miss Linnie Davis a Presbyterian missionary to Corea. God bless her; a missionary to Corea has more to endure than one in the African jungles.
3
Bro. Thompson has a solid and manly presence. Has a good wife. Shelby is a sort of summer resort. Noted for the Cleverland Sulphur Spring about 2 miles from the town. There is a lithia spring in the square sold a cent per glass. Population 2,000.
4
Left Shelby at 9 a.m. Reached Lincolnton at 10:30. Brother Steele met me at the depot. Read and rested the whole p.m. A beautiful night. A full house and appreciative. Brother Steele seems to be a man of "get about." His wife, a plain and hardworking methodist wife―good and hospitable.
 

21. 6월 27일

1
27th. Tuesday. Charlotte.
 
2
A lovely morning. Miss Hattie Crowell, a country girl visiting Brother Steele's daughters, is one of the prettiest I have seen. Dark hair and dark brown eyes full of light and life. Brunette. A lovely set of teeth. Sweet voice. Modest and graceful manners. Envy the man who shall be fortunate to win her!
3
Left Lincolnton with pleasant memories. Reached Charlotte 10 minutes of 12. Went straight to Dr. Creasy's. Found him a courteous gentleman, and handsome. Oh it does weary and worry me to go to a strange place especially a large town and hunt after people and force myself upon their hospitality. I can't be used to this.
4
Charlotte is the metropolis of the W.N.C. Conference. Methodist have a handsome church and a good parsonage. It seems, by the way, the Carolinians provide for their preachers better homes than Georgian and Tennassians. Population of Charlotte 15,000. A good Y.M.C.A. building.
5
Dr. Creasy has 7 children. Isabela the youngest is the prettiest. For the first time I came across memory strings. Isabela has a string around her neck. She asks her friends to give her something to hang on the string―be it a button, a key or what not.
6
Had a good and appreciative house; thanks to the energy of the good Doctor. Met Bro. Tillet, the brother of Dr. Tillet. He is a lawyer in the town. Was really happy to see him for his sake and for the sake of Dr. Tillet.
 

22. 6월 28일

1
28th. Wednesday.Munroe.
 
2
At 12 a.m. left Charlotte better pleased than I had feared. Reached Munroe at 1:15 p.m. Dr. Barnette met me at the depot. He reminds me, in his looks and behavior, of Dr. Tillet more than anybody. His wife is a good woman with the marks of hard work. It is a noticeable that the wives of Methodist preachers are as a rule pale and worn out. No doubt, the sytem of itineracy sacrifices the interest of the few for the benefit of the many.
3
Had a good audience.
 

23. 6월 29일

1
29th. Thursday. Wadesboro.
 
2
Spent most of the a.m. in conversation and croquet. Left Monroe at 12:45 with thankful heart for the most cordial hospitality of Dr. and Mrs. B. Reached Wadesboro within an hour. Brother Townsend met me at the depot to my great relief.
3
Had to postpone my talk to Friday night on account of the closing service of a revival held in the Baptist Church.
4
Was put up in the Burn's House. Received and enjoyed a letter from Mrs. Ellen B.
5
Rained in the first part of the night. Attended the service Rev. Gales an Episcopalian evangelist led the meeting. His discourse was earnest and direct.
 

24. 6월 30일

1
30th. Friday. Wadesboro.
 
2
After a stroll in the woods, spent the morning in Brother Townsend's study in reading. There are many good thoughts in Emerson's essay on self-reliance.
3
The sage says "The only right is what is after my constitution; the only wrong what is against it. No law can be sacred to me but that of my nature". A fine stuff this! It is my nature or constitution to love intoxicants. I was educated to it―never. It is my nature to love sensual pleasures. It is my nature to be selfish, jealous, revengeful. If Emerson is right in saying, "if I am the devil's child I will live then from the devil", then why should I be responsible to man or God for indulging myself in licentiousness, intemperence, evil passions? It may be my nature is worse than that of other folks. Nay indeed! The trouble is the general run of human nature is no better than mine and the greater trouble is that most of us do "live from" our nature.
4
Emerson exhorts us not to conform ourselves to the world. Very good. But his non-conformity has the elements of cynicism and bitterness and harshness that ill contrasts with the beautiful Pauline doctrine of non-conformity.
5
I like Carlyle ten times better than Emerson. Both are strong. Both are thinkers. Both are independent and fearless. But Carlyle seems to be great without effort. His writings rugged as they are pervaded with reverence for things eternal and sacred. On the other hand Emerson seems so little in his greatness. His needless and uncalled for defiance and labored originality repel me.
6
Had a fully packed house. The audiences of N.C. so far have been the least liberal of any I have spoken to in Tenn. Va. and Ga. I am sorry I didn't go to Texas.
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윤치호(尹致昊) [저자]
 
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