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◈ 윤치호일기 (1893년) ◈

◇ 7월 ◇

해설목차  1권  2권  3권  4권  5권  6권  7권 8권  9권  10권  11권  12권  윤치호

1. 7월 1일

1
1st. Saturday. Wadesboro and Rockingham.
 
2
A beautiful morning. Spent most of it in Brother Tillet's, study in writing letters to Mrs. N.C., Mrs. A.H and to Spencer.
3
Reached Rockingham at 2 p.m. Brother Doub having a sick child, put me in the hospitable charge of Mrs. Ledbetter. In the course of conversation it was found that she is the aunt of Tom Shepherd, even the sister of Mrs. Shepherd of Reidsville Ga. I could not have been better pleased if she were my own aunt. She, from her natural kindness and also from the discovery that I am Tom's chum extended to me the most cordial and family like hospitality. She is an excellent woman whose kindness, like that of Mrs. Hawes and others engrave itself into one's heart.
4
Brother Doub didn't impress me as a strong character.
 

2. 7월 2일

1
2nd. Sunday. Rockingham.
 
2
Worshipped in Brother Doub's church. Dr. Moore the P.E. preached on the importance of joining church. He seemed too much if―you―crack―a―joke―I'll―crack―your―head sort of a man. Dined at Mrs. Scale's.
3
The white sand and hot sun hurt my eyes very much. Had a good crowd. Regular collection5.00. Mrs. Leak an old lady gave me5 extra. Very kind of her indeed.
4
Rockingham claims about 1,500 people. A nice little town. Steeles, Ledbetters, Leaks are the leaders of the community.
 

3. 7월 3일

1
3rd. Monday. Maxton.
 
2
In the morning, Mr. R.L. Steele an old gentleman, gave me5.00 with the request that he should be informed of my progress after my return. Very kind! Mrs. Ledbetter gave me a50 piece of the Confederate money and a ten dollar piece. These pieces shall be kept more than a mere curio.
3
Reached Maxton at 3 p.m. Bros. Betts and Trawick met me at the depot. Brother Betts seemed at first sight like a religious crank; but revealed himself on better acquaintance a most saintly man I have ever seen.
4
The pastor, Brother Cain being away, I was taken care of Brother Trawick. He lives about a mile from the town. Has a fine orchard and I feasted on his plums. He is a kind of encyclopedia on feet. His knowledge seems like the wild West extensively laid out but thinly settled. He has a nice wife of strong common sense.
5
Had a good crowd.
 

4. 7월 4일

1
4th. Tuesday. Maxton and Lumbeton.
 
2
1. Maxton was once called Shoe Heel, a corruption of the word Cue Heel. The country round about being mostly inhabited by the Scotch Irish, great many names begin with 'Mac' hence Maxton or "town of Mac's". It is said when you meet a stranger in Maxton and call him 'Mac' you would hit his name 9 out of 10 chances.
3
2. Was once a swamp land used by Lowries or tribe of Indians as their refuge. Maxton is one of the most moral places in the State. With about 800 people, it supports a flourishing Y.M.C.A. and in the hall noon prayer meeting has been kept up for the past four years. Presbyterianism is strong.
4
Dined at Brother Betts's. This godly man often addressed me as "my son" which I appreciated very much. Has three daughters with him; all good looking and sweet and sensible. The youngest the prettiest. Miss Sallie the oldest sewed the rip in the Corean "to shu", a small act in deed but which shows her womanly thoughtfulness. I shall be satisfied if I ever get a wife like one of the three Betts girl.
5
Reached Lumberton about 4 p.m. The dusty streets crowded by negroes and whites no decenter than negroes to howl and yell at mule and oxen races to celebrate the day of the Independence of America!
6
Brother McCall the pastor has a sweet wife. He is a conscientious and kindly man but weak. Had a niggardly crowd. The richest man in the country put in a quarter for himself and his lady. So said Brother Mc.
 

5. 7월 5일

1
5th. Wednesday. Wilmington.
 
2
Up at 5. Mrs. McCall was so kind as to be up at 4 a.m. to get a breakfast for me. Left Lumberton at 6. Reached Wilmington at 9. Went straight to Dr. Norman's parsonage. Found him and his wife a pleasant couple.
3
Met Brother McCall, the brother of the P.C. of Lumberton. I had known him in W. Hall and he was very kind to me. Talked to the women's monthly missionary meeting.
4
Had a good audience and responsive.
5
Wilmington is the largest town of the state. Was once the greatest center of turpentine, tar and rosin trade. The diminution of pine trees in N.C. and the competition from Georgia has largely destroyed the commercial prosperity of Wilmington. Sustained severe shocks from the failure of two banks within the present year.
6
Brother Willy Creasy, the oldest son of Dr. Cr. of Charlotte called on me. He is a handsome young man but looked worn out from heat and hard work. After the church he walked with me to the parsonage and as we parted, he said with emotion, "God bless you!" Shall never forget the sweetness of that benediction from this young man. God bless him!
7
Dr. Norman is an excellent pastor. A man of excellent part combined with magnetism and tact and pluck. He is a universal favorite. Has a fine looking wife and worthy.
 

6. 7월 6일

1
6th. Thursday. Fayetteville.
 
2
Up at 5 a.m. The thorn of the flesh. Brother McCall came down to the river to see me off. Left Wilmington at 6:30. Reached Fayetteville at 9:30. Brothers Lyon and Sutton met me. Bro. S. carried me to Mrs. Spencer's boarding house. Was delighted to find the lady one of the dignified, yet kind and obliging and thoughtful women I have seen. Her youngest daughter Miss Emma is a perfect rose bud.
3
Received letters from Mrs. N.C. Miss F.E. and Bell. All welcome.
4
Had a tolerably good crowd. Perhaps the tightest3.67.
5
Went home with Brother Lyon, the P.C. He has a sweet wife. According to him Fayetteville is the oldest town in the old northern state. Once had the command of the Cape Fear River trade and was one of the most important trading centers in N.C. But R.R.'s by cutting the products and trade away from the town have injured it very much. It is now a "deadest" old town. Brother L. said the town would not move a step unless some old men who rule it die out with their prejudice and selfishness. The Meth. Number about 400.
6
The Meth. Church is thrice defunct I believe that!
7
Fayetteville has the honor of having a negro postmaster. He gives more satisfaction to all parties than any of his white predecessors. While the people acknowledge this fact they want to remove him because, for sooth, he is a negro. Oh, land of the free and home of the brave this is!
8
Shall always have a feeling recollection of the seething heat, dusty streets and the close audience of Fayetteville.
 

7. 7월 7일

1
7th. Friday. Raleigh.
 
2
Had a much needed rest whole day. Took supper at Mrs. Spencer's. Her kind and open hospitality drew my heart to her. Spoke for Brother Sutton in his mission church. They gave me 67¢ which I had hardly expected.
3
After return from the church spent two hours in the company of Mrs. S and her son and daughter. Mrs. S once lived well in Louisburg N.C. Widowed about 14 or 15 years ago. Change of fortunes compelled her to make a living in her present occupation. She is fond of Dr. Norman and spoke most gratefully of the attention which the Dr. paid to her sick children when he was her pastor in Louisburg. A lecture this is on pastoral theology.
4
1. A Methodist preacher of broken health, with a struggling wife and seven or eight children in a house having no ice and not even good cool water―this presents the darker side of a married life.
5
2. Dr. Moon, the P.E. of Rockingham District, complained that negros as soon as educated to a certain degree would teach or preach rather than work for a living. Then he sagely remarked that a race as the African shouldn't be educated higher than the sphere in which they live. If teaching or preaching commands higher pay and a easier task why blame the negro for prefering it to hard labor or less remuneration? Isn't that what every white man doing? Isn't that what every man in every age and every race and every clime doing? As to the sphere, who is he that shall presume to dictate to his fellow beings which sphere they should occupy. If America means anything, it means opportunity. Let each one have his chance to mend his sphere if low.
6
3. It is shocking to hear some preachers rattle off the benediction at the close of a service in an, I―don't―believe―a―word―of―it style.
7
Received the photo from Miss Ora Martyn. Was very happy to get it. Sweet girl!
 

8. 7월 8일

1
8th. Saturday.Raleigh
 
2
Left Fayetteville at 9:50 a.m. Little Lily Lyon the pastor's daughter gave me two handkerchiefs. No doubt her mother gave them to me through her sweet little girl. Very thoughtful and kind she is.
3
From Sanford, got on a mixed train. The dust and heat were dreadfully oppressive. Got to Raleigh at 3:30 p.m. Went to Dr. Cole's parsonage. Found him a pleasant man. On account of company, I was sent to Brother Young's, the superintendent of the State Institute for the Deaf and Dumb.
4
He is a widower. His daughters keep house for him. Miss Nellie seems to be sweeter than the other two as nice as they are.
5
Had a refreshing shower and cool night. Received a most interesting and sweet letter from Miss Ora.
 

9. 7월 9일

1
9th. Sunday.Raleigh
 
2
A beautiful morning on the campus of the Institute.
3
Spoke in the central Methodist Church. Brother Hulley, the pastor, seems to be man who wouldn't take the trouble to do better if he can do good enough. Example: Yesterday evening he asked me if I could find his church. I answered in the affirmative. Then he invited me to go with him to the square where he could show me the church. Good enough. But better it would have been if he should have sent someone to accompany me. This morning I asked him if there were a blackboard in the church. Yes said he. Then I told him I should like to have it if it wouldn't cost him too much trouble. "Can you do without it?" said he. "Oh, yes" was my prompt answer. "Well, then," remarked he in a relief, "just go ahead without it." Good enough. But better had I the board.
4
They gave me4.27. I am used to the stinginess of N.C. audiences. I have seen more of them in one week than in three months in Ga. or Va.
5
Answered Miss Ora this morning.
6
Had a large audience in Brother Cole's church.
 

10. 7월 10일

1
10th. Monday.- Smithfield
 
2
A shady and delightful a.m. Brother Sam Young, a nephew of Superintendent Young was so kind as to take me in his buggy around the city. Was charmed with the drive and the town. Raleigh with its 16,000 inhabitants is a city-of-groves. It is more of a residence than a business town. Two fine colleges for the negro. A splendid penitentiary. Two female schools for the white. Four cotton factories. An agricultural college. An insane asylum, and an institute for Deaf and Dumb and Blind.
3
Called on Dr. Reid the President elect of the Greensboro F.C. He has as yet the charge of the Raleigh Adv. He has a face and manners that inspire confidence and love in those who meet him even for the first time.
4
Shall always be thankful to Brother Sam Young for his kindness.
5
Left Raleigh at 12:30. Reach Smithfield at 4 p.m. Brother Pucket met me and homed me in Hotel de Gulley, an one-horse inn. A negro woman who seemed to be a cook, waiter and a boss all at the same time asked for a dime no sooner than she saw me.
6
Wrote to Mrs. Spencer asking for the picture of Miss Emma. Had an ordinary crowd.
 

11. 7월 11일

1
11th. Tuesday.Wilson
 
2
Reached Wilson at 12:30. Found Brother Ivey and wife away. Dr. Anderson took charge of me. On our way to the hotel, we met Brother Leath who kindly offered to entertain me. It was a cup of cold water to a thirsty soul.
3
Notwithstanding great many hindrances such as a lawnparty, mind-reading entertainment, and odd fellows' meeting, I had a fair audience. After my talk, with Dr. and Mrs. Anderson, went to the Opera House to witness the tests for mind-reading. Prof. Goushun is a Canadian. He claims to know what you think or will by feeling the pressure of your hand. He asks you to hide an object unknown to him. Then he takes you by hand and go blindfolded to hunt for the hidden object. He hit as often as he missed.
 

12. 7월 12일

1
12nd. Wednesday.Wilson and Goldsboro
 
2
Up at 5 a.m. Brother Leath took me in a gig to visit the farm belonging to his friend. Sixteen miles both ways. The crops, on our way, of cotton, corn and tobacco were very poor. Brother Leath told me that when he came to Wilson 7 years ago he didn't find a single farmer around Wilson who planted tobacco. But now hardly there is a farmer who doesn't. Enjoyed the drive very much, though the old disease of last night made me feel weak.
3
Wilson is a lively little town of 1600 people. Brother L. is a native of Petersberg Va. He is one of the best men I have seen, pious, sensible, social and good to all. Has a good wife.
4
Wilson has a colored postmaster. Brother L. said that the negro servants are in the habits of calling negro women "colored ladies", and white ladies "white women."
5
Left Wilson at 2:30. Reached Goldsboro at 3:45 p.m. Brother B.R. Hall met me and put me in the hotel, he being compelled to go away.
6
Brother Conover, the secretary of Y.M.C.A. conducted the meeting for me. The audience was small, mostly girls with about a dozen or less men.5.10. Was disappointed in Goldsboro―its indifferent church members etc.
 

13. 7월 13일

1
13th. Thursday.Kinston
 
2
Gladly enough left Goldsboro at 8:20 a.m. Reached Kinston at 10. Came to the parsonage and found Bro. Shamburger a pleasant host.
3
N. Carolina is one of the poorest states in the South (financially) ; eastern N.C. is one of the poorest sections of the state; this season is the poorest in the year; this month seems to be the poorest of the season: Hence the poorest time I am having in matter of collections.
4
The complaint of hard-time is universal among all classes. If all they complain is true, it is a wonder how people still engage in amusements and pleasure trips etc. No doubt this hard time complaint started by some with some reason has become fashionable and great many people indulge in it simply for the sake of saying it.
5
Had a good audience.2.15!
 

14. 7월 14일

1
14th. Friday.
 
2
Couldn't sleep last night tormented as I was toy bed-bugs. Then the old disease! It seems every bad thing comes on in a troop!
3
Mrs. Shamburger is a good house keeper. Her's is one of the happiest families I have seen.
4
On reaching Newborn about 11:30 Brother Willis met me and took me to Mrs. Meadow's, one of his daughters being sick. Mrs. M. lives in a commodious house right on the river bank.
5
She is one of the best women you ever saw. Her husband is a successful merchant and a good man.
6
An oppressively hot day. I was told by Brother Willis that if I had wanted the worst day in the year for my lecture I couldn't have selected a more unfavorable night than this. In the first place the weather was oppressive. Then the encampment in Morehead city drew away large crowds from the town. Besides these there were other entertainments etc. Had, however, a much better crowd than I feared. They gave10.
7
Everything at Mrs. Meadow's is Br.
8
At the table, chickens, beef, tomatoes and fruits are served on large plates in pieces that might feed a family in an ordinary household.
9
Met Miss Lizzie Neal and her sister, Mrs. Fannie Bell. The former told me that she once danced with Penn(邊燧) . Mrs. F.B. is a fine looking woman having two of the sweetest and smartest little girls I ever saw. She lives in Washington. D.C.
 

15. 7월 15일

1
15th. Saturday.
 
2
After breakfast Mrs. Meadow kindly took me in her buggy to the national cemetary. Left Newborn at 11:30 a.m. Reached Morehead City at 1 p.m. Brother Edmonson met me and we took dinner in the hotel.
3
The atmosphere of Morehead is so charged with moisture that its stickiness was almost unbearable in so hot a day. Stayed at Bro. Charley Wallace's where Brother Edmonson boards. Received letters from Walter S., Mrs. Armor, Miss Edna who sent her picture.
4
Brother Edmonson after a years stay in W.H. went to Cal. But returned East a year ago. He knows Dr. Haunon―that good man whose warn hospitality in San Francisco I shall never forget. Brother Ed. shows a great deal of go and pluck.
 

16. 7월 16일

1
16th. Sunday.Morehead
 
2
Couldn't sleep last night from heat and mosquitoes. Attended the S.S. service and was gratified to see the interest manifested in it by the members―especially grown men.
3
Dr. McClure of Wilmington, a Presbyterian minister and the chaplain of the State guard preached a most edifying sermon in our church. Dined at Brother Reynold's.
4
Morehead has a population of about 1,500 whose chief occupation is fishery. Nothing remarkable about the place. No or very few trees. Deep sand every where. Is growing steadily.
5
Mrs. Wallace has a face that inspires love and confidence at the first sight. A kind hostess, loving wife and a true friend she is.
6
This morning at 8:15 a.m. while I sat by Brother W. studying the S.S. lesson, a man who was pumping water nearby asked in a tone of contempt, "Is the preacher (Edmonson) up yet?"
7
"Is getting up now" was Brother Wallace's reply. I wouldn't like have the same remarks made of me if I can help it.
8
At the breakfast table, Brother W. and his charming wife were fondly talking to their little girl whose quietness and sweetness attracted my attention. The little thing is about 2 years old and has been sick. The fond father kissed her and said "You are a beauty". To my disgust, Brother Edm. said. "Yes, you are but for your face!" No wonder the young and wounded mother darted a fiery glance of indignation at the thoughtless preacher while the father, with commendable forbearance, went on fondling the little creature as usual. I wouldn't so hurt the dear mother's feeling for any consideration.
9
At 4 p.m. Dr. McClure, Brother Edmonson and myself got into a boat and sailed for the camp. The wind and tide being against us it took us nearly two hours to reach the encampment. Nothing to be seen but tents and soliders. Came home at 7 p.m.
10
Had a packed house.12.00. Brother Edmonson is a good hand at collection.
 

17. 7월 17일

1
17th. Monday.Kinston and Grifton
 
2
Brother and Mrs. W. showed every kindness in their command while at their home.
3
Brother Edmonson gave me the most cordial and brotherly treatment all the time. God bless them.
4
Left Morehead at 8 a.m. Reached Kinston at 10:30 expecting to be met by Brother J.C. Jones of Grifton. But he was not there! Had to go to Brother Shamburger's. He and his good wife were kind to me.
5
At 4:30 p.m. left Kinston in a buggy sent from Grifton. Rode 14 miles. Got to Grifton a small R.R. town, at quarter to 8. Expected some kind of supper, but to my great surprise, Brother Jones with the utmost good nature informed me that his wife being away I must be "kind enough" to go without any supper! Well I was kind enough but he was unkind enough.
6
Brother Jones is a big 250 pounder. Lazy beyond expression, and inquisitive above measure―So much so that while I was bathing my face with soap all over it, he was idiotic enough to ask what the animal products of Corea were! Am sorry for his wife. He gloried in the fact that he never selects hymns until he gets in the pulpit and never buys ticket until he gets on the train.
7
Had a good crowd more liberal than the Kinston folks. They gave3.46 after a repeated request of Brother Jones for a 'small' collection, and 'little contribution'. He took away1.00 to pay for the buggy I was sent for.
 

18. 7월 18일

1
18th. Tuesday.Greenville
 
2
Left Grifton at 8:15 a.m. on a freight train. Reached Greenville at 10:15. Went to Brother Smith's. Very hot―almost suffocating.
3
Met Brother R.R. Johnthe P.E. of Washington District.
4
Had a short nap and a refreshing sponge bath. A steady rain from 4 to 7 p.m. Had agood house―$4.09.
5
The Managers of the Fair have decided to close the gate on Sundays. Their godless outrage did not pay. Another proof that a day of rest out of seven is a necessity that human wisdom would invent if there were no divine ordination.
 

19. 7월 19일

1
19th. Wednesday.Washington
 
2
Left Greenville at 8:30 in a buggy. It was very fortunate that I met up with Brother John returning to Washington in private conveyance. Otherwise I would have to stay over at a small junction from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
3
The drive was pleasant as it was long―25 miles. For the most part of the road we had to drive between shades formed by forests. The crops of the finest sort.
4
Reached Washington at 1 p.m. In the absence of Brother Davis the pastor, I am taken care of by Brother Call and his excellent wife. He is a local preacher who keeps a grocery store.
5
Rained just before the service hour! A beautiful thing! Had a better audience than I feared from the rainy hindrance.
6
Brother and Mrs. Call have no children. They are raising an orphan girl 5 years old. She is a pretty and affectionate little creature. It is almost painful to see that the little girl seems to know her condition. She is timid, guarded in her talk and actions.
 

20. 7월 20일

1
20th. Thursday.Washington
 
2
A beautiful day.
3
Rested in writing letters, walks, etc.
4
At 6 p.m. Mrs. Call took me in her buggy hitched to a tiny little pony. Took in the whole town in an hour. The streets parallel to the river are named 1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc. The 4th and 5th street are mostly occupied by colored people. The 2nd and Main street are prettiest. The wicked elements of the town are assembled on a very untidy street called Water Street, lelt to the Market House. Lumber trade is flourishing. Plenty of melons.
5
This is the home of Mrs. Call. Her great grandfather was the pioneer Methodist preacher in the town. The old town was burnt during the war.
6
Spent the evening very pleasantly in the parlor where Mrs. Call played for me.
 

21. 7월 21일

1
21st. Friday.Tarboro
 
2
Left Washington and its kind friends at 7:30 a.m. Reached Tarboro at 10:30. Found Brother D.H. Tuttle come home yesterday―On going to his parsonage which had not been used for two or more preaching weeks, I found myself in confusion of dust, beddings and of children.
3
Brother Tuttle is a thorough going man who does not leave a thing half done. In speaking of the indifference of some preachers concerning my work, he said "Some of them are not worth a cent in such matters."
4
Took dinner at Dr. Jones! Brother Merritt is a young preacher just from the college. He is helping Brother Tuttle or rather Brother Tuttle helps him by his strong personality.
5
Had a good audience, mostly ladies.
6
So far as paying is concerned I would just as well speak to a churchful of benches as to a churchful of ladies: They carry no pockets. Yet I would not like to talk to an audience minus the fair.
7
Received a letter from Mrs. Ellen B. and also from Mrs. Spencer of Fayetteville.
 

22. 7월 22일

1
22nd. Saturday.Conetoe; Rocky Mt.
 
2
By the arrangement made for me, thanks to the energy of Brother T. I went to Conetoe in a buggy about 8 miles from Tarboro. Brother Merritt went with me. Found Conetoe a small R.R. town of recent birth. Had a surprisingly large crowd considering the time of this day, 11―12.4.25. Taking into account of the place etc. the audience was the most liberal I have yet struck in North C.
3
Brother Eveton is a jolly man who does not stand on ceremonies much. Took dinner at Mrs. Jenkin's a well to do Methodist lady. Enjoyed my trip to the little town very much. Met Miss Mary Charles.
4
Returned to Tarboro about 4 p.m.
5
Left the-town-on-the-Tar, at 6:30. Reached Rocky Mt. about an hour later. Brother Guthrie met me. Went to bed early.
 

23. 7월 23일

1
23rd. Sunday.Rocky Mt.
 
2
The room I was put in was full of heat and bed-bugs. Could hardly sleep.
3
Worshipped in the Methodist Church. Brother Guthrie preached. When the weather is sultry; when the audience is small and sleepy; when all things languish;―under such circumstances a preacher certainly lacks commonsense to talk listlessly and unanimated and to give out dried-up, unfamiliar hymns of some drearious L-o-n-g m-e-t-e-r.
4
Rested all the p.m. Had a full and interested house.5! The miserable and indifferent way and tone in which the P.C. asked for a contribution sickened me. The wonder is not that no-body gave liberally but that any should drop a nickle or a copper at all. Oh I am tired of these starchless preachers too lazy for anything.
5
A beautiful night Spent more than an hour in conversation with Mr. John Bullock, the son of the lady who keep the boarding house where I have been staying. He is an intelligent young man. He said that it was a sin and barbarism for the South to own slaves. He expatiated on the injustice and folly of caste system that prevents individuals from rising in society by personal merit etc. All very good. But right in the course of the same conversation he said that colored post-masters ought to be removed because they were once slaves and not because they are incapable. Another instance of the victory of prejudice over judgment.
6
The more I consider the responsibilities of a preacher the solemner they look. It is a down right blasphemy for a man of no special sanctity of life, and of no earnest convictions to stand up before a long suffering congregation to belch out crudities and nonsenses as the message from the Almighty.
 

24. 7월 24일

1
24th. Monday.Halifax.
 
2
A hot day. Rocky Mt. is quite a R.R. center. Miss Bullock a school-mistress of some 50 years somewhat bored me with her learnings. She said that the Chinese are a most degraded ane horrible people, that they make their quarters a most dangerous resort; that they make lots of money here and send them back etc. etc. She was surprised when I told her that the Chinese whom she sees and hears about are not fair specimens, that they are as good and intellectual a people as the Japanese.
3
Left Rocky Mt. at 1:45 p.m. On reaching Halifax, found Brother Davis, the P.C. absent. Mr. Dicken took me to his 'hotel'.
4
Halifax has about 400 people. Looks poor. One of the oldest towns in the State; having once been the capital of the commonwealth.
5
Tried to rest some in the p.m.; but the bed was so full of bed-bugs that I could not sleep a bit.
6
Mr. Dickens is a good natured man who has a large and almost empty house for his 'hotel'. He is the proprietor, the clerk, the waiter, the house-keeper, the everything of the whole establishment. His wife does not seem to be a much help.
7
Brother Fred Froelich in whose hand Brother Davis put the meeting in charge is a nice man. He tried his best to announce the lecture etc. He came to this country when 18 months old.
8
Had a good and very appreciative audience. When I got through Brother F., without saying a word, took the basket and carried around―a new phase of collection!2.49. The smallness of the contribution was compensated by the sociableness of the ladies and their manifest appreciation of the talk. They heaped compliments on compliments.
9
On my way to the 'hotel', to the dreadful room of bed-bugs, Mr. F. and I went in Mr. Grady's. His two daughters and Miss Jessie Cutchen, excited by a momentary interest and novelty almost lionized me. Woe unto me should I be so idiotic as to take their impulsive kindness to be of a permanent esteem. While fully conscious that their enthusiasm would not last a night I enjoyed their company nevertheless. They kindly exchanged pictures with me.―
 

25. 7월 25일

1
25th. Tuesday.Halifax; Littleton.
 
2
Last night returning from Misses Grady's at 11:45 tried my best to sleep but in vain. The bed was simply chokefull of bugs. In the morning I found a dozen or more carcasses of these vile things indicating the bloody battle waged between us in the night.
3
After breakfast went up to the old cemetary where of the dates go as far back as 1766. Then to the Magazine Spring. There is a stone fountain containing the water. The work is supposed to be Indian in its origin. The Spring is very clear and cool.
4
At 9:30 Bro. Froelich took me to Mrs. Brown's. She is a nice lady and told me one of the greatest sacrifices of her life was made when she sold a dear old watch chain to help building the A.C.C. Called on Mrs. Aelson and Misses Jessie and Mary.
5
Left Hal. at 11:30. Bro. Rumley met me when the train got to Littleton. "Homed" at Mrs. Myrick's, a good, fat lady of comfortable circumstances. Very hot.
6
The country here reminds me a deal of So. Ga.―sandy, flat, piny.
7
A beautiful night. Had a good turn out. There is an audience whose unsympathetic and indifferent manners throw a shuddering damp over me. Such was the Littleton crowd.2.81. Found 3 pieces of quarter, plenty of nickel and 21copper cents. Each of these dear coppers must represent the liberal soul of some ci-vi-1-i-z-e-d g-e-n-t-1-e-m-a-n who thanks God that he was born in the land of Gospel and freedom.
 

26. 7월 26일

1
26th. Wednesday.Warrenton
 
2
Had a breezy morning Wrote to Dr. Allen, Mrs. A.H.
3
Bro. Rumley is a promising young man. The slim success I had is not his fault for he did everything for me.
4
Littleton is a college town. The Methodists have a female college. A Baptist keeps a high school for boys.
5
Reached Warrenton at 2 p.m. Bro. Daper met me. Came straight to Phenix Hotel kept by Dr. Long a retired Methodist preacher.
6
Had a fair and appreciative audience.
7
Crops are doing poorly about here and rain is badly needed. Carts drawn by oxen are in fashion.
 

27. 7월 27일

1
27th. Thursday.Warrenton and Henderson
 
2
After the breakfast took in the town by myself.
3
From 11 to 12 the hour was pleasantly spent in a ramble with Tom Foote, a little boy about 10 years old. He has a handsome face and is remarkably bright and surprisingly well bred. Said he for instance "Miss Flora Johnson told me to ask your age last night; but I would not do anything of the sort. That's so impolite." His father is a lawyer and owns a paper. The little fellow took me to his field and treated me to a watermelon.
4
Left Warrenton at 1 p.m. Reached Henderson at 2:30. Bro. Cuminggim met me at the depot. His parsonage is one of the best kept I have seen anywhere. "His wife must be a good woman" thought I before I saw her and found later on that I was right.
5
Had a good rest in the p.m. Bro. Cuminggim tried to make my stay as pleasant as possible. His wife has a very pleasant face. Her sister Mrs. Bourne looks almost like her. Her graceful manners and words charm me.
6
A beautiful night. Had a good and appreciative audience. Met Bro. Rosster, the Y.M.C.A. secretary of the town. I was acquainted with him in Ga. and it gave me much pleasure to see him here. Met Miss Sallie Wyche, the sister of Miss Martha whom I had known in Balino. Both of the sisters are charming young women of lovable character.
7
After the church service had a most refreshing bath at the Y.M.C.A.
 

28. 7월 28일

1
28th. Friday.Henderson
 
2
Up at 6 a.m. After an early breakfast I went down to the depot; but found that the freight train doesn't stop at Franklinton. So I had to return to the parsonage. Well, I so delighted with the quiet home and the kind ladies of Bro. C.'s that I am partly glad that I have to stay over a few hours longer. How with them? That's another question entirely.
3
Lett Henderson at 2 p.m. for Franklinton. Fell into the charming company of Miss Bruton on the train. She was the art-teacher in Littleton College last year. On reaching the journey's end I went straight to the church where the District Conference was holding one of its evening sessions. The meeting lasted from 3:30 to 6:30 and the topics for discussion were "Assessment", "Religious Literature" and "Education." On the last subject Dr. Reid presented the cause of Greenville F.C. and Trinity College in an able speech. Denominational education was emphasized.
4
No word can express the tender joy I felt in meeting Bro.N.H.D. Wilson, after a separation of two years. As a special favor he entertained me himself. Mrs. Minnie Wilson is one of the sweetest little women I have ever seen. In her obliging and sweet manners she reminds me of Mrs. Rawlings.
5
Too tired to go out to the preaching.
 

29. 7월 29일

1
29th. Saterday.Franklinton
 
2
A pretty day. Attended the morning and closing session of the District Conference. "Education" was the subject. The claims of Littleton F. College, of Louisburg F.C. and of Franklinton Academy were presented by their respective friends. The president of Louisburg F.C. said in his speech that one of the most serious difficulties in his path is the rivalry of other Methodist schools. "In my possession," said he, "I have letters from the presidents of other Female Colleges persuading my girls to quit my college."
3
Dr. Cuninggim denounced the injustice of the state for taxing the people to support the University. He said that he was perfectly willing to contribute his means to the primary education of the state but not to the higher education of which only a few can avail themselves. He insisted on keeping up and patronizing denominational schools.
4
The Conference closed with a love feast of enjoyable communion.
5
Attended the business meeting of the Raleigh District Women's Miss. Society. I was too sick to enjoy the proceedings.
6
This night being given to me for my lecture I went to the church at 8:30. The expectant faces of the audience which filled both rooms in the church lubricated my tongue, toned my nerves and cheered my spirit. My talk was received with flattering appreciation. Met Miss Evie Webb of Katesville.
 

30. 7월 30일

1
30th. Sunday. A morning shower soon passed away. Franklinton.
 
2
Talked to the S.S. Heard Bro. I. Cole of Raleigh preach. Dined at Mr. Cheatham's, with Bro. Rose, a young preacher.
3
Supped at Bro. Ballard's, the S.S. Superintendent of Bro. Wiison's church. He has fine children and good home. Went to the colored Christian Church to hear Bro. Rose preach. His discourse on the book of our life was good. Enjoyed the songs―"Old time religion" and "Over the river"―sung by the whole congregation. In colored churches as in white ones the choirs monopolize the singing. If I ever have the charge of a church I shall either do away with the choir or make the audience sing more than they do.
 

31. 7월 31일

1
31th. Monday.Louisburg.
 
2
Left Franklinton at 12 for Louisburg. About an hour's ride and I was there. Bro. Thompson met me and took me to the parsonage. Louisburg is noted for its shades. Thunder, lightening, and rain from 5:30 to 9 p.m. broke up my appointment.
3
For the past three days my appetite has been poor, my legs sore, and my health dragging.
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