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◈ 윤치호일기 (1893년) ◈

◇ 8월 ◇

해설목차  1권  2권  3권  4권  5권  6권  7권  8권 9권  10권  11권  12권  윤치호

1. 8월 1일

1
1st. Tuesday.Oxford
 
2
After breakfast went up to the college to see the building etc. A poor affair for a female college.
3
Left Louisburg at 11 a.m. Reaching Franklinton I had just the time to call on Mrs. Wilson. Bro. Nath W. came to the depot to see me. Bidding him good-bye, God only knows for how long, I left Franklinton and its hospitable people for Oxford. When the train got to Henderson, Bro. Cuninggim met me and took me home for dinner. His thoughtful kindness won my heart completely.
4
Miss Alberta, Mrs. C.'s sister, is really fine looking. She has a pretty mouth, a pair of bewitching eyes of soft blue and attractive smiles that reveal a set of pearly teeth. She is a grass-widow―how sad!
5
Got to Oxford about 3 p.m. Dr. E.T. White met me at the depot and took me home in his buggie. Rested most of the evening. Inspite of the exceeding poor advertisement, I had a tolerably good audience and liberal.8.36.
6
Dr. White graduated in the Vanderbilt medical department. His wife is a delicate but a nice lady. The Methodists have a poor house of worship.
7
Oxford claims about three thousand inhabitants. Looks substantial and town-like. Met Dr. Wyche, the brother of Misses Sallie and Martha. He is a "tooth dentist", as a colored man said to me.
 

2. 8월 2일

1
2nd. Wednesday.Durham and Hillsboro
 
2
At 8 a.m. Dr. Whitaker and I went to the Orphan Asylum supported by Masons and Methodists. Dr. Black is the superintendent of the institution. His wife widely known as "Aunt Mary" is a missionary worker and a splendid looking woman.
3
The orphanage has two departments, one for girls and the other for boys. There are about 120 in each. Connected with the institution there is a large farm on which the boys work. Was sorry I couldn't be at Oxford for longer time.
4
Left Oxford at 9:30 a.m. Reached Durham at 11. Had to wait 6 tedious hours for the train for Hillsboro! Spent sometime in the Y.M.C.A. rooms. The pro-tem secretary of the Y.M.C.A. was kind. The rooms are very poorly managed.
5
At 2 p.m. walked up to the Trinity College. The campus has 65 acres of ground. The main building is a fine affair with dormitories. Electric light and baths. The Trinity College Inn is a splendid wooden building supplied with all conveniences for the accommodation of boys.
6
Dr. Crowell, the President, showed me a deal of kindness.
7
Rev. Beaman, in whose church I am to speak next Sunday night, was away. Mr. Southgate, one of his official members, told me that Dr. Beaman had left no charge in regard to my engagement!
8
Left Durham―the city of tobacco―at 5:30 p.m. At the Hillsboro depot about a mile from the town, Bro. Caviniss met me. I was dreadfully tired but I had to walk. No appetite for supper.
9
The room which Bro. C. occupied and in which I had to stay over the night was full of odor of unwashed sweat. Mrs. Colley, the lady of the house, is a dried-up woman.
10
Too sick to speak; but I had to. Hillsboro is one of the oldest N.C. Towns.
 

3. 8월 3일

1
3rd. Thursday.Burlington
 
2
Up at 20 minutes to 6 a.m. Took train for Burlington at 6:30. Reached the town at 7:30. R-e-v-e-r-e-n-d Underwood being absent I had to hunt after some of his members. Called on Mr. Hunt, the editor of the News. He sent me to Prof. W.E. Ormond. The Professor was not very glad to see me and told me that Bro. Underwood had left no special directions for the lecture. I don't blame the "Reverend" for his vacation trip but for the negligence that put me to so much embarassment.
3
Mr. Hunt kindly helped to put up a notice in the Post Office. After which I came up to Prof. Ormond's where I dined, and napped. In all probabilities rain is going to interfere with or break up my meeting.
4
Rained just in time to hinder many from going to the church. Had a larger audience than I feared. All seemed to enjoy the talk. Rain most of the night.
 

4. 8월 4일

1
4th. Friday.Chapel Hill
 
2
The rain of the night put fresh colors on all the trees, vines and flowers. The morning glories around Prof. Ormond's study in their rich hues were the prettiest of the kind I have ever seen.
3
Left Burlington at 10 a.m. Reached University Station about 11:30. Rained hard. The train between the station and Chapel Hill is one of the slowest in this country. 7 miles in nearly one hour and a half.
4
On reaching Chapel Hill, Bro. Watson, the P.C., was found absent. The announcement was most poorly made.
5
Called on Mrs. Mangum, the mother-in-law of Bro. N.H.D.W. She is a fine looking lady of benevolent face.
6
Notwithstanding bad announcement and worse weather a fairly large audience came out to hear me.
7
There is a considerable rivalry between the state Univesity and Trinity College, not unlike that between Emory and Athens. The trustees of N.C. State University were forced by public opinion to forbid balls on the campus during the commencement. But the boys have elected a ballroom a few steps beyond the forbidden ground.
8
Mr. J. Watson, whose, hospitality I enjoyed while in Chapel Hill, is a nice old man.
9
Chapel Hill is a clean, cool town depending largely on the University.
 

5. 8월 5일

1
5th. Saturday.Durham
 
2
Left Chapel Hill at 10. Reached Durham at 12:30. After dining on some peaches went to the Y.M.C.A. rooms. Finding that Rev. Beaman was still away called on Mr. Southgate and Rev. Bishop to make arrangement for the Sunday. Mr. Southgate made an engagement for me with Capt. Parish, the chairman of the board of steward.
3
At 4 p.m. called on Capt. Parish. After due consultation we agreed that I should address the Trinity congregation at 11a.m. and the Main Street audience at 8 p.m.
4
Engaged a room at Mrs. Yearby's boarding house. Went to bed soon after supper.
 

6. 8월 6일

1
6th. Sunday.Durham
 
2
Attended the S.S. in the court-house as the new Trinity is as yet incomplete.
3
At 11 the room was fairly full. Had a most interested audience. Capt. Parish took up a collection15.20. Took dinner with Rev. Walker, a local preacher. He seems to be in a comfortable circumstance. He has charming grand-daughters.
4
Rested in the afternoon, though bedbugs prevented me from any sleep.
5
Had a full house in the Main Street church. My talk here was almost an entire reproduction of what I gave in Grace Church Wilmington. But strange to say Rev. Bishop thinking my reference to female costume indelicate reminded me of the limit of time. The blow was most painful and I wound up my talk with as much composure as was possible.
6
1. Rev. Bishop kindly (and I don't doubt the good motive in which he gave me the lesson) told me that I ought to quit all my foolishness, referring to my illustrations or I would ruin my cause.
7
2. Isn't this strange that what the audiences in Grace Church and other places enjoyed should be such monstrous indelicacies to the Main Street gentlemen and ladies? May be Rev. Bishop judged the whole matter according to his own standard.
8
3. While this may be true, I must, though through no desire of wrong motives, have indulged a little too much in fun. For this blunder I might have deserved the correction. For this correction I thank Bro. B. In full appreciation of the spirit in which he gave me the advice. I entertain no harsh feeling against him.
9
4. Yet how hard; how painful; how mortifying! This check or rebuke seems to me like a spark of hell fire in its effects on my mind. The anguish of shame, remorse and humiliation made me wish I were buried in the darkness into which no eye of contempt or ridicule could peep!
 

7. 8월 7일

1
7th. Monday.Roxboro.
 
2
Bed-bugs and bitterness of soul prevented me from having an hour's sleep last night. Up at 5:40 to catch the north-bound train.
3
Last night's experience almost paralized my spirit. Today I am dreamy and it requires efforts to smile or to talk. Am sad and weary!
4
Reached Roxboro at 7:30. After breakfasting on a watermelon and resting some in the little boy's store by the P.O. in reading old papers, came to the parsonage with Bro. Tuttle. He has a nice home and a good wife. His table manner is extremely boorish.
5
A lovely day of autumnal coolness and clearness. Such weather has always made me feel melancholy; and it makes me doubly, nay, ten times more so because of my mental anguish.
6
Had a large audience and appreciative.
7
Roxboro is a town of about 600 inhabitants. Nothing of special interest.
 

8. 8월 8일

1
8th. Tuesday. A beautiful and cool day.Lynchburg Va
 
2
Left Roxboro at 7:30. Reached Lynchburg at 11:30 a.m. Went to Miss Fannie's direct from the depot. The welcome which she and her brother and Miss Lottie extended me was really hearty. Everything in their home looks as it did two years ago.
 

9. 8월 11일

1
11th. Friday. A hot day throughout.Lynchburg Va
 
2
My rest would have been complete but for old enemy which drains my strength so badly.
3
Wandering thoughts etc. etc.
4
1. Lynchburg is the hilliest city I have seen. It sits on seven hills. They are: (1) Court House Hill; (2) Federal H.; (3) Garland H.; (4) Diamond H.; (5) Daniel H.; (6) College H.; (7) White Rock H.
5
2. The house where Miss F.E. lives is the home where Bishop John Early lived and died. It occupies the most desirable site on Court Street, the finest residence street in the whole city. From its back porch a fine mountain view is commanded.
6
3. The houses on Court Street are free from flies and mosquitoes―a rare blessing.
7
4. Miss F.E. is a strong character full of will and fuller of talk. She is affectionate and steady in her friendship. She has a deal of common sense and emotion. She is aristocratic in feeling and bearing though not in circumstances. She is emphatically a good woman, in whom you may repose your love and confidence.
8
5. Bro. T.H. Early is a man of better heart than head. He loves his friends with sincerity and denies himself to any degree to oblige them. He is exceedingly and minutely careful―too much so. In his microscopic attention to details he loses sight of wider and more extended area of things.
9
To this may be ascribed his failure in business. His greatest enemy is his dispepsia which keeps him in constant depression that is simply distressing to himself and to his friends. God bless him and deliver him from racking cares!
10
6. Miss Lottie, a cousin of Miss F.E., is a woman of fine inellect and indomitable will. She is an artist and loves her work. These three lives are linked together by ties of blood sanctified and strengthened by those of friendship, mutual dependence and lasting love. God preserve them from danger and in peace!
11
7. Do not afflict your friends with the sighs and stories of your cares and sorrows! If needs be unbosom your troubles to a friend whose sympathy you may be sure, only once, then bear your burden cheerfully or in silent and grim determination.
12
8. Miss F.E. asked me if I ever get mad! Have I deceived her in hiding and controlling my passions? Certainly not. It is no sin to hide our passions as long as we design no harm behind those who may offend us.
13
9. A South. Carolina lady once said to me that Mr. George H. Bell is a very sweet spirited young man!!! How easy it is to deceive, without any design on our part, those whom we meet only by chance. They can't see our real character which our intimate friends alone may understand. God help me to be kind and sweet when I am alone!
14
10. The indifference and carelessness with which some people hear and see things are sometimes astonishing. Rev. Bryan, a Baptist missionary from China, lectured in the Baptist Church at Chapel Hill N.C. on China etc. A Methodist brother who heard him told me that Mr. Bryan was a missionary from Africa and that he spoke of the hardships(Bryan) underwent there etc. Often after my talk on Corea, a sleepy-headed fellow would ask me about the island of Corea!
 
15
Took supper at the residence of Dr. Garland, the P.E. of Lynchburg District. He is a nephew of Chancellor G. His wife is a fine looking woman.
16
Last summer Cleveland or Hill took the entire possession of the minds of the people wherever I went. This summer the only thing and the supreme topic of conversation and attention are "hardtime" and money. It is said this has been the most trying year in the history of American finance. Bank failures are an every day occurrence over the country. Distrust reigns supreme in all circles. While everybody, regardless of sex, age, occupation and circumstances, crys for a speeding remedy no one knows what that remedy shall or ought to be.
17
No doubt the hoarding of money by rich men is one of the causes of the scarcity of money. Many people complain of hardtime because others say so.
 

10. 8월 12일

1
12th. Saturday. A breezy morning.Lynchburg and Bedford City
 
2
The Y.M.C.A. rooms are well kept and managed by Bro. Snead.
3
At 4 p.m. left Lynchburg for Bedford City. Dr. Garland, the P.E., paid the R.R. fares. Relying too much on the minute directions of Bro. Early and as the train didn't do exactly as Bro. Early told me she would in matter of stopping etc., I missed the Bedford depot and had to walk six miles on the cross ties back to the City. Moral: Don't burden a man with too many directions. Give room for the exercise of his sense and judgement.
4
When I got to Bro. Japling's house it was 8:30 and my feet were sore. Fortunately I found Bro. Japling a kind and hospitable man. Spent the evening very pleasantly in playing the game of authors with Miss Annie J., Mrs. Arthur, a charming little woman, her husband, Mrs. Jones of Portmouth and Mrs. Japling, a lovable hostess.
 

11. 8월 13일

1
13th. Sunday. A pretty day.Bedford and Lynchburg
 
2
Spoke in the Methodist Church. Had a very attentive audience.6.
3
Left the City at 1:20 p.m.; reached Lynchburg at 2. Talked in the Y.M.C.A. hall at 4 to a mixed congregation composed of all the denominations. Had a very appreciative hearing.
4
At 6 attended the C.E.S. meeting in Court Street Church and gave a short talk. Bro. S., the excellent S.S. Superintendent and the President of the Endeavor S., gave me3 in the name of the Society. Court Street Church has always been very indulgent and kind to me. This no doubt is largely due to the example and help of Bro. and Sister Early's.
5
Went to Mrs. Brown's for tea. The old lady is the President of W.M.S. of Court Street Church. Her two daughters specially Miss Annie is a good Christian worker. Miss Annie makes china-painting her specialty and showed me some of her pretty works. Was too tired to enjoy the supper.
6
At 11 left Lynchburg for Washington D.C. in order to avail myself of the cheap excursion rate; only3 both ways. The ordinary fare is10.50.
 

12. 8월 14일

1
14th. Monday. A beautiful day throughout.Washington D.C.
 
2
The train rolled into the B. and 0. depot at 6:15 a.m. As soon as I got through washing and refreshment, I started out to take in the "City of Magnificent Distances". Went to Iowa Circle to see the Corean legation. As I drew nigh to the building a sense of melancholy patriotism moved my heart. Somehow or rather I loved to linger around the lovely precincts over which my national colors waved. A colored woman told me that all the Corean Officers had gone to some summer resort. If any were there I doubt they would have welcomed me, rebel.
3
The woman consented to show me some of the rooms. There were some Corean articles but none of them was pretty enough to make me proud. On one of the parlor walls there is hung a group picture of the Corean Commission to the World's Fair. I was shocked and disgusted with their looks of supreme stupidity and beastly sensuality. With sad heart I left the rooms.
4
Next I went to the Japanese legation on N. Street N.W. #1310. Met Mr. Nakayama and from him I learned that Messrs Philip Jaisohn and Soh were still in the capital. Mr. Nakayama sent me to Mr. Nishio, a Japanese medical student, as the proper person from whom I might learn more definitely about the two Coreans. So I went to 1708 F. Street and introduced Mr. Nishio. I shall never forget the cordial and polite welcome which he gave me. He gave me every necessary information concerning Soh and Jaisohn. He invited me to breakfast and when we got through we went out together, he going to the hospital and I to the Medical Museum.
5
Called on Dr. Jaisohn in one of the rooms in the Museum. The coldness with which this Corean friend(?) greeted me most painfully contrasted with the kindness of Mr. Nishio. Was very sorry that Mr. Soh was out of the city. I know he would have been very happy to see me. From the Museum I went to 1117 B Street S.E. to call on Mrs. Bell whom I had met at Mrs. Meadow's in Newburn N.C. When Mrs. B. told me in Newburn to call on her should I come to Washington, who ever dreamt that I would so soon see her at her home! It is wonderful how things that seem impossible often become actualities. Mrs. B., her sister, Miss Lizzie, and Imogene and Laura, two little girls of Mrs. B., gave me a warm reception.
6
At 11:50 accompanied by one of Mrs. B.'s boys, I went to the Capitol. Saw the House and the Senate in session. The scene was "confusion worse confounded" in the House. But more orderly in the upper chamber. As I beheld the fine set of men in the Houses the one thought that was upper-most in my mind was: Make a people free and intelligent and all greatness follows.
7
Lunch in the Capitol (55¢ for a cup of coffee, sandwich and a piece of beef) . Bought a copy of Pocket Bible ($1.30) . Spent the rest of the p.m. up to 4:30 in the Capitol. The city view from the dome of the Capitol is beyond description in its beauty. The city is laid out with all the main thoroughfares, leading to the Capitol. The wide walks, shades, circles of exquisite design, well paved streets fine substantial buildings, everything goes to make Washington the Queen of American cities. There is such an air of repose and geniality about the town that is simply charming.
8
Went to 1208 K. Street N.W. to see Dr. Jaisohn and to engage a lodging for the night. I was proud to hear that Dr. Jaisohn graduated in the Columbian Medical College with 2nd honor, that he was appointed an adjunct professor in pathology etc. in the school, and that he gets100 a month in the Museum. From the fact that Dr. Jaisohn hadn't seen Mr. Soh for nearly a year(!) I judged they are not on cordial terms. This may be partly explained on the hypothesis that:
9
1. Dr. Jaisohn is diametrically opposite to Mr. Soh in nature. The former is stingy, selfish, unpatriotic, while the latter is generous, intensely patriotic and affectionate.
10
2. Dr. Jaisohn is sailing happily and smoothly and Mr. Soh is barely making a living. Naturally Dr. Jaisohn might be expected to avoid his poor but proud relative.
11
Dr. Jaisohn has almost entirely forgotten his native tongue both written and spoken.
12
After supper, or rather dinner. Dr. Jaisohn left me saying that he had some patients to attend to. I was not sorry to part with him so I went to Nishio's and found him a most congenial friend. During our conversation it turned out that Mr. Miyaoka, the secretary of Japanese legation, is the very young man who, in 1881, introduced me to Prof. Fenorosa and to Prof. Kanda(神田乃武) , and who in 1884 went to Corea with Lowell. As soon as I hear that he was in the legation I asked Nishio to take me to him. But on our way we met Miyaoka just going out for a stroll. He was much surprised to see me and we went walking and talking altogether. Found him a dude, very smart, all intellect and scarcely any heart. He treated us to light refreshment and handled his money with the abandon that characterizes a stylish Japanese "Ohuisan". After our parting I was glad to be alone with Nishio who has not lost his native politeness and warmth in the superficialities of Western polish. He accompanied to Dr. Jaisohn's boarding house.
 

13. 8월 15일

1
15th. Tuesday.Washington D.C.
 
2
Had a good rest. Up at 7:30. As soon as I payed1.00 for the lodging, I told Dr. Jaisohn and his hostess good-bye and pulled out for the town. A hearty breakfast for 25¢ in a respectable restaurant. Called on Nishio who was waiting for me.
3
Leaving my satchel in his room I went to the Washington Monument. 500 feet high. More than 900 steps. When I was in Washington in the summer 91, I had to walk up and down, the elevator being broken.
4
Took lunch at Nishio's 1:30 p.m. After tepid bath I felt very tired. But unwisely I went out again and walked to the Boston Variety Store. Among the few little things I bought in the Store was a set of the game of familiar quotations. Thence to Capitol from which I rode to Mrs. Bell's house. I was so sick that I could hardly move about. Took dinner with her family. I wished I had been well enough to enjoy their kind hospitality.
5
Reached Nishio's room half dead with fatigue, headache, fever and aching legs. From 7 to 10 I took a rest that was absolutely necessary. At 10:15, head still aching, I went to the depot. Nishio accompanied me inspite of my protest. He didn't leave me until he saw me safe in the the car. Heaven bless him!
6
As soon as I got into the car I doubled myself up and went to sleep inspite of the crowd, noise and pain.
 

14. 8월 16일

1
16th. Wednesday.Lynchburg; Greensboro N.C.
 
2
The sleep refreshed me very much. On waking at 6 a.m. found myself in the car shade of Lynchburg. Went to Miss F. E.'s home. Spent most of the a.m. in resting, talking and packing up.
3
At 4, bidding farewell to Misses F.E., Lottie (whose sisterly kindnesses to me shall ever be sweet and precious in my grateful memories) I went to the depot. Bro. Early, inspite of his wretched health, would see me off. God bless him!
4
Reached Greensboro N.C. about 7:45. Went to the parsonage. Had just time enough to wash myself before the church hour. Had a small but appreciative audience. After lecture Mrs. Hilliard, the pastor's sweet wife got me up a cold supper. The glass of milk and bunches of grape did me much good after the day's fatigue.
 

15. 8월 17일

1
17th. Thursday.Summerfield and Valey Home.
 
2
After breakfast Bro. H. and I went up to Greensboro F.C. to see Miss Martha Wyche. But she was away, to my great disappointment.
3
Left Greensboro at 9 for Summerfield. Went to the parsonage, but Bro. Craven was away in the country. His wife treated me kindly. Wrote to Miss Fannie.
4
After a good dinner, Mr. Rob. Craven, the pastor's son, and I started out at 2 p.m. for the fifteen-mile journey. The road was rough. Reached the place where Bro. C. had been holding a protracted service at 5:30.
5
Was "homed" under the hospitable roof or Bro. Moore. He is a prosperous farmer in the community and has a good home. His wife is an excellent woman. Suffered intensely from chill and fever, all the evening.
6
Had a great crowd in the open air the stand alone being under an arbor. My health held out better than I had feared. After the talk Bro. Craven ask the congregation to shake hand with me and to place whatever they felt disposed in my hand. It was a very foolish proceeding; but I would let the presiding person do what he thought best than quarrel. The hand shaking went on for about 10 minutes. Bro. C. gave me5. Am sorry he did on his limited salary.
7
Bro. C. told me that the communtity is full of hardshelled. Baptists.
 

16. 8월 18일

1
18th. Friday. A pretty morning.Mt. Airy
 
2
The house in which Bro. Moore lives is styled the Valey Home, a suitable, located as it is in a lovely valley.
3
Fever blister bothered me a deal. At 11:30 Bro. Moore took me in his buggy to the Pine Hill depot. Here I took a train to Walnut Cove where I waited 3 hours for the C.F.and Y.V. train for Mt. Airy. Wrote to Mrs. N.C.
4
Left Walnut at 3:10 p.m. reaching Mt. Airy at 5. Went to the parsonage. Bro. Blair was very kind. He put me up at the Central Hotel. Sick all the evening. Had a crowd very appreciative.
 

17. 8월 19일

1
19th. Saturday.Winston
 
2
Left Mt. Airy at 10:30. Reached Winston at 1:15 pm. Bro. Curtis met me at Mt. Airy depot and came direct to the Centenary parsonage. Bro. C. is a Vanderbilter whom I had seen in Wesley Hall.
3
After a rest Bro. C. and I got on a car and went to Salem an old Moravian settlement. Bro. C. tells me that the two towns have tried time and again to unite but in vain on account of the unwillingness of either town to give up its name. Winston is said to be one of the most progressive town in the state.
4
Salem has a Moravian F.C. Its cemetery is very pretty. The tombs are marked by stone slabs laying over them. The avenue just outside of the cemetery is lined by old cedars and is certainly one of the prettiest walks I have ever seen.
 

18. 8월 20일

1
20th. Sunday.Winston
 
2
Centenary Church has a large S.S. I was requested by Mr. Crawford, the S.S. Superintendent, to talk about 5 minutes. Then with Bro. Curtis went to Grace Church of which he is the P.C. Had a large and appreciative. Dined at the home of Bro. K. near to the church. Talked in the Grace S.S.
3
Had large and very interested audience in the Centenary Church. After I got through when I asked Bro. Crawford, a serious man, if I had said anything objectionable, "No! No indeed! Everybody enjoyed it. Not a thing objectionable. It was a very appropriate talk." This emphatic declaration of the brother moved me for I had been very anxious to come out of my Sunday ordeals without disgrace.
 

19. 8월 21일

1
21th. Monday. Beautiful mornings and evenings but hot days.
 
2
Winston.
3
After breakfast came to the pastors study and spent the a.m. in bringing my diary to the date.
4
Afterthoughts and facts:
5
1. My friend Nishio has a single room in a nice private house and pays8.00 in which his board is included! One beauty of living in Washington D.C. is most of the houses in the city are provided with baths.
6
2. Washingtonians are very civil. When I asked one for any place he would spare no pain in directing me aright. One man laid down a small tool chest and walked a little distance to show me a place.
7
3. Miss Fannie is a good housekeeper. She is very particular about table manners. She mended my underwears for me. I appreciated this womanly office very much.
8
4. I am really tired now. I long to be through with my list and return to Ga.
9
5. Bro. Curtis is a well-bred young man. He has been as good to me as if he had known me for years.
10
6. In the late contest for the chaplancy of the House of Representatives, one of the candidates had a card on which was written "one-minute's prayer". Shame!
11
Left Winston at 6:15. On reaching the depot of Kernersville, nobody met me. Went to Dr. Sapp's Hotel. Found him a gruff old man. Missed Bro. Poe very much. Had a very appreciative audience.3.
12
A beautiful night of moon. After returning to the hotel, had an hour or two of talk with Mrs. Sapp, the daughter-in-law of the old man, and Miss Dora S., his niece from Ohio. The old Doctor is quite a kind-hearted and hospitable man notwithstanding his forbidding exterior. One of his sons, Luther S., is a physician, dreadfully rough. He talks to his father in worse terms and manners than a decent man would to a nigger. His familiarity with his sister-in-law is such that I found it almost impossible to persuade myself they are not wife and husband.
13
Met Rev. Bryan, the Baptist Missionary to China.
 

20. 8월 22일

1
22nd. Tuesday. A pretty but warm day.Kemersville N.C.
 
2
Bro. T., a Methodist local preacher, took me to his home and gave me grapes, and peaches as much as I could manage. Went to the Baptist Church to see the opening exercises of a Baptist Convention. Bro. Bryan preached a good sermon; though I was too sleepy to hear all.
3
"If you want to keep your religion, let Baptists alone". Bro. Sapp said this was an injunction of a good old Methodist. There is a deal of rivalry between the two denominations.
4
Spent a hour or two very pleasantly in playing the game of quotations with Miss Dora, Mrs. Sapp and Dr. L.S. Helped the ladies to peel peaches in the evening.
5
Kemersville is a quiet town of about 1,200 people. Stores of very modest description. Four churches in the village; (1) Methodist; (2) Baptist; (3) Moravians; (4) Presbyterian. The main street is nearly a quarter of a mile long. Has some nice homes. Paced up and down this quiet street under the beautiful moon for nearly two hours. How I ionged for a friend to commune with!
6
Before going to bed, went to the Baptist church and caught a few words of Baptist bragging of Baptist progress. Then to a colored church and saw two persons, one man and the other woman, wallowing in the saw-dust in great agony crying for mercies.
 

21. 8월 23일

1
23rd. Wednesday.High Point
 
2
Left Kernersville at 5 a.m. Began raining from 6. Refreshment at Greensboro. Fell in love with a little boy, Porter, a nephew of Miss Debnam. He is a very intelligent and good boy.
3
Reached High Point at 9 and was put up at Jarrel Hotel. Rained all the day. Bro. Jones, the P.C., is a nice man. He asked me something about the Main Street Church affair.
4
The rain stopped in good time for the lecture. Had one of the largest and most interested audiences I had in the State. After hearing me Bro. Jones expressed his surprise that anybody should object to my illustrations. He said he found nothing in my anecdotes that is irrelevant. Thanks!
 

22. 8월 24일

1
24th. Thursday.Lexington
 
2
Early in the a.m. called on Bro. Jones. His wife reminded me somewhat of Mrs. A. Hoss. Both good women, therefore!
3
On reaching Lexington Bro. Clement met me at the depot telling me that Bro. Boone, the P.C., had left the service in the hand of some of his members he himself being absent.
4
Was more than glad to meet Dr. Norman and his good wife. This town is the home of Mrs. N. Found Mrs. Clement a sweet and hospitable woman.
5
Bro. Clement keeps a general store. He is a handsome looking man; but his manners and talk betray that he hasn't been born to elegant manners. Farming seemed to be his favorate occupation. Among the first things he asked me was my age (of course) and my former occupation if it were not farming. Then he inquired whether or not my father was a farmer. He is a good man after all that. Had a very good house.10. The liberality surprised me. Dr. Aorman helped me in the meeting.
 

23. 8월 26일

1
26th. Saturday.Concord
 
2
After a pleasant rest under the hospitable roof of Bro. and Mrs. Clement, left Lexington at 9:30 a.m. Bro. Eugene Pool, one of the sons of the good Doctor, met me at the Concord depot. Rained some, before the noon.
3
Received cheering letters from Prof. W.B.B. Bro. W.L. Cuninggim, and Miss Fannie. She signed herself "Your attached sister". Ah that did me good!
4
After dinner at Dr. Pool's I was sent to Bro. Odell's elegant home where I was to stay during my visit. Mrs. Odell is an elegant little woman whom travel and money have given a polite culture. Her home is perhaps the styliest I have been entertained in during the summer.
5
Mr. W.R. Odell owns one of the largest cotton factories in the South. He is a young man and a strong Methodist. He and his wife are doing excellent work for and among the 700 or more hands in their employ.
6
At the request of Bro. Smith, the pastor of the "Odell" church, I led the Saturday night prayer meeting.
 

24. 8월 27일

1
27th. Sunday.Concord
 
2
The Odell (Forest Hill) Church was crowded. My address was received with marked attention. When I got through Mr. Bacon came up and giving me a dollar said "I would have given you two dollars if you had talked an hour longer". The collection went far beyond my expectations.17! The largest from any single church and this congregation mostly of factory hands.
3
Cloudy p.m. Had a full house at Dr. Pool's church, the Presbyterian and Lutheran congregations added to the Methodist. From the kind words and cordial greetings of a large number of ladies and men I breathed freely that I didn't offend anybody. Dr. Pool endorsed my talk without any exception. Began raining from 9. On my way home hard rain compelled me to take shelter in Mr. Ch. Montgomery's home for a few minutes. Miss M. is a pleasant and pretty girl whose company I was happy to be in.
4
Fred Odell, the oldest boy of Mrs. and Bro. Odell, is an intelligent boy and showed me a great deal of attachment.
 

25. 8월 28일

1
28th. Monday.Concord
 
2
Such a storm I have never seen since my born day. The north-easterly wind and hard rain shook the house from about 2 a.m. Wind and rain all the day. Trees blown down. Corn laid low. Confined people to their homes all the day. Was very sorry not to see Bro. Surratt who preached only a mile or two from Concord.
3
Had to leave Concord at 8:30 in order to make proper connections for Statesville. Had to deny myself the great pleasure of taking tea with Mrs. and Mr. Montgomery and of seeing Miss M. to my heart's contentment.
4
The moon smiled coquettishly just before the train left Concord at 9:15. The buss is cheapest I ever saw in Concord, only 10¢ from any place in the town to the depot. Competition makes this.
5
Had to stop over at Salisbury.
 

26. 8월 29일

1
29th. Tuesday.Statesville
 
2
Left Salisbury at 10:15. Met Bro. Edmonson on the train. He asked me about the Main Street Church affair and said it was unkind of Bro. Bishop to do so. Well, I can think of Durham, or Main Street, or anything about the affair without shuddering with shame and disgust.
3
Reached Statesville at 11:15 a.m. Dr. Dixon is absent. Inspite of my three reminders, the Doctor has absolutely told nobody about the appointment. Fortunately I found in Bro. W.E. Auderson a business-like and warm-hearted man. On hearing the details of my case he at once set about to get up a crowd. Had a very respectable crowd and appreciative6.34.
 

27. 8월 30일

1
30th. Wednesday.Morganton
 
2
Reached Morganton at 1 p.m. Went straight to the parsonage. Found Bro. Page a kind friend. He said that he had heard from a disinterested party about my trouble in Main Street Church and that in his opinion Bro. Bishop was wrong.
3
The parsonage is one of the finest I have seen in the State. It is built of bricks and so fine that I did not believe it a Methodist parsonage until Bro. Page told me. N.C. has better homes for preachers than Ga or Tenn. Led the prayer meeting for Bro. Page.
 

28. 8월 31일

1
31st. Thursday. Rained all the day.Moranton
 
2
Rested.
3
Inspite of the rain and mud, had a good audience and very intelligent. After return from the church Mrs. Page, Misses Annie and Jessie, Mr. Bogur and myself played the game of quotations. Miss Jessie is a very pretty girl. Was disgusted with the would-be witness of Mr. B.
4
Both Miss Annie and Jessie go to the State Normal School. I don't like that. I believe everybody ought to support and patronize his own denominational institutions, especially when they are as good as the undenominational. I cannot understand why a Methodist preacher above all others should send their children to schools outside of his own denomination.
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