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◈ 윤치호일기 (1896년) ◈

◇ 9월 ◇

해설목차  1권  2권  3권  4권  5권  6권  7권  8권  9권 10권  11권  12권  윤치호

1. 9월 1일

1
1st. (24th of 7th Moon). Tuesday. Rather cloudy.
 
2
Studied at home. Very homesick for mother and wife more than others; must be waiting for me.
 

2. 9월 2일

1
2nd. Wednesday. Sunny.
 
2
Joined Cook's party at 10 a.m. for the Versailles excursion. The way by the magnificent Avenue du Bois de Boulogne―St. Cloud. The palace of St. Cloud was destroyed 1870. The man who bought the ruins of the palace made a fortune by selling small blocks of stones as souvenirs. He also gained a considerable sum of money―so the story runs―by selling the gas fittings of the palace laid under the reign of Louis XⅣ, who died in 1715. But gas didn't come into use until 1830! The park of St. Cloud is very lovely, like all parks in and around Paris.
3
Visited the Grand and Petit Trianon. Rooms which Napoleon I occupied and his furniture shown. In the malachite room there stands a large, beautiful basin made of that precious stone―was presented to Napoleon I by Alexander I of Russia. A room is also shown where Napoleon I was married to his Austrian wife under the law, as the then Pope refused to sanction his divorce from Josephine. In the coach house several state carriages are seen. One in the middle is said to have cost Napoleon 1 one million from Sedan chairs also.
4
In 1871 Germans occupied the Trianon palaces, but they didn't touch a picture or any other article of value.
5
Lunch at 1:30 p.m. Very poor for 3fr. The splended palace and garden of Versailles built by Louis XIV. He is said to have employed ten thousand men during ten years to build them. The fountains cost now from 8 to 10 thousand francs to play a few hours. But during the time of L. XIV they played night and day. The water comes from ( ) , 10 miles from Versailles. In the palace old historical paintings and curios are shown. The rooms where Louis XVI lived, danced an died―the Balcony where the herald cried "The King is dead, long live the King"―the room where the unfortunate Marie Antoinette was take prisoner to walk to her prison in Paris―the rich Lyons silk curtains of Louis ⅩⅣ―the place, where the faithful Swiss guard of Marie Antoinette were killed―so many rooms and associations, pictures asd stories in this grand but melancholy edifice.
6
There are said to 20,000 soldiers in Versailles, as this is the place where the government transfers its seat in time of trouble.
7
Returned home about 6 p.m.
 

3. 9월 3일

1
3rd. Thursday. Cool-cloudy and sunshine.
 
2
By the help of God, I shall turn a new leaf in my life―for the better. Christ who gave the sinful world the parable of the prodigal son will not cast me away if I return to Him in sincere repentance.
3
Melancholy and homesick all day long. I would like to see my parents, my dear wife. I would like to see the hearty Petersburg friends―among whom fair Natasha, innocent and sweet, I can't forget.
 

4. 9월 4일

1
4th. Friday. Cool and cloudy.
 
2
French lessons as usual.
3
Only this afternoon, after lunch, I learned that Prince Lobanoff had died 5 days ago. Stoutness in appearance doesn't guarantee lingevity. If so Colonel Cockrell, who died in Cairo last February, and Prince Lobanoff, who was in perfect health when I saw him last, would have lived longer.
4
As a lesson, had a ling French conversation with Mr. Arcambeau. He tells me that Prince Lobanoff was 71 years old; that he (Mr. A) had known and disliked Hong Chong Woo; that Komura has lately been recalled to Japan; that the new Japanese representative at Seoul, Mr. Hara, is one of his old pupils.
5
Received a letter from Messrs. Joo and Min at Petersburg.
 

5. 9월 6일

1
6th. Sunday. Rainy most of the day.
 
2
Visited the garden of Acclimation, a beautiful layout of 50 acres with a zoological collection, a Palmarium, a Museum of Chase and Fishery. Among the animals which I saw for the first time there are hamadryad monkies, a giraffe, south American alpacas, kangaroos, red ibises etc. A panorama of the antediluvian world is crude but worth 50 cents. Dinner at the St. Honore Restaurant, after which an exhaustive promenade.
3
Received a letter from Mrs. Stein. Very glad to hear from her. By the way, I saw two Russian ladies and a child in the garden today. It was really delightful to hear once more the pretty accents of Russian cafes. Russian summer gardens are the characteristic institutions of these countries. A chinaman, drunk, goes to sleep; a Frenchman, alcoholized, goes to quarreling; an Englishman "tight," goes to howling; a Russian "full" goes―nowhere but falls down senseless anywhere his legs tumble.
4
The French people are gay―they always sing.
 

6. 9월 7일

1
7th. (1st of 8th Moon). Monday. Cloudy.
 
2
I miss the Russian tea, or something warm, here. On the table there is nothing but cold water and sour wine to wash down hard bread or a dry beefsteak. Miss Schmidt has very little in her that is sweet, soft, warm and liberal. Miss Hardcash! Economy is a good thing, but when the landlady seems to count and weigh every particle of food you eat―no wonder I don't enjoy my meals. Besides, the common table bread in Paris makes me dyspeptic simply to look at it―so hard and dry. Oh for a cup of good coffee!
 

7. 9월 12일

1
12th. Saturday. (TABLE)
 
2
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3
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4
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5
Has rained day in and day out all this wet week. A little clearing up today.
6
1. Had one of the fiercest struggles with one of the fiercest temptations all the day. Got the best of it―thank God. One who can keep his moral legs straight in this vortex of temptations must be fortunate.
7
2. Two puzzles. Why does the Russian gentleman wear or carry his overcoat, even an ulster, in the hottest days of Petersburg? Why does a French woman keep her finger nails long―not always very neat?
8
3. Years ago a French missionary published a book on Corea denouncing the immorality in the palace with a holy horror. Did he forget that Paris is full of it? Oh well, Paris has so many churches of the Catholic religion, while Corea is a pagan country. An American or a European seems to have a conscience peculiarly sensitive to the sins of a heathen people.
9
4. As the day decline, prolonged become the shadows. As one declines in years, the further his memories stretch.
10
5. No wonder Paris goes fast; the whole city runs on wheels.
11
6. Bicycle riding is the rage of Paris. The loose pantaloons which the female bicyclist wears are neither feminine nor masculine. They must belong to the neuter gender. Why doesn't she put on a pair of breeches and be done with it?
12
7. There are several big stores where one may fairly buy everything he needs. Among them the Bon Marche, the Louvre, the Samaritin, and the Belle Jardiniere are best. In the last named "magasin" the division of labor is carried to a fine point. There when you go in and buy an article the man on duty gives you a billet with a big number in the middle and the same number in small type on the sides like this:
 
13
He detaches one of the subdivisions and pins it on the article. You take the ticket and go to other stands, buying whatever you want. When the sub-numbers are all gone you go to the counter, behind which stand long tables with pigeonholes. There you show the number to one of the clerks. He then takes out your purchases, which have come to the counter someway or other, and shoves them on to the bookkeeper who takes down the prices. Another clerk right by collects the money from you and sends you to the packing counter. Here you hand the number to the packer and get your packet and go.
 

8. 9월 13일

1
13th. Sunday.
 
2
Heavy rain all day long with short intervals of sunshine now and then.
3
Wrote to Mr. Min and Joo in Petersburg―also to Mrs. Stein. Wrote to my Darling.
4
I wish that the confucian doctrine were true that the human nature seeks righteousness as water seeks its level.
 

9. 9월 17일

1
17th. Thursday.
 
2
A most lovely day―especially welcome after so many days of rain.
3
The English system of measures, which is irregular beyond measure, and the French rules of conjugation, which are a jumble of exceptions, are blots on the two otherwise splendid civilizations.
4
Miss Schmidt "When one eats a fish full of bones, he must not talk."
5
T.H.Y.: "A bony fish must be, then, good for ladies."
6
At 10 a.m. joined the Cook's Excursion party.
7
1. Madeleine: Foundation in 1764, finished only in 1842. Cost 520,000 pounds sterling. In 1871, about 500 communist killed inside of the sanctuary. Only 9 months ago, or so, a communist wanted to the church to blow it up in the dead of the night. But his unexpected encounter with the curate of the church at the back door so startled him that he dropped his bomb, which blew him up him alone.
8
2. The Place de la Concord. The spot on which stands the Obelisk of Luxor was occupied by the guillotine 1793. Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette were executed here. Between January 1793 and May 1795, 2,000 persons or more were guillotined here. In 1770, a panic at the fireworks celebrating the marriage of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette crushed 1,200 people to death.
9
The Obelisk 76 feet high. There are 8 statues in the square representing the chief towns of France. The one representing Strasbourg which was ceded on, rather returned, to Germany in 1871, is adorned with flags and garlands―tokens of patriotism of the French inhabitants of that town. The place has been the seat of encampment of foreign armies for three successive times. 1814-15-71.
10
The Pont de la Concorde was built of the stones of the old Bastille. The sites in the neighborhood of the Palais de Elysees―which, by the way, is the French "White House―cost £100 □ yard.
11
In the Palais de la Industrie, President Carnot once give a dinner to 1,200 mayors. On his right sat the mayor of Lyons, a town of 15 hundred thousand inhabitants, and on his left, the mayor of Brittany of six people.
12
The insurance companies of Paris are forced to invest part of their profits in erecting fine buildings for rent. The owners of large houses are under legal obligation to scrub the houses at least once in 10 years. If a proprietor doesn't do it, the state does it for him―only at his own cost.
13
3. The Arch of Triumph. Designed under Napoleon I finished by Louis Phillippe. 160 feet high, 146 feet broad, 72 feet deep―cost 400,000. 12 fine avenues radiate from this common centre of "L'Etoile."
14
4. Trocadero Palace and Gardens―an oriental building of an immense magnitude in the form of a crescent. From the tower a fine view of Paris.
15
5. The Hotel des Invalides. Founded 1670 by Louis XIV. The facade toward the Seine 600 feet wide. The dome 340 feet high―gilded. By the way the Russian Church has the other of the two gilded domes in Paris.
16
The Hotel contains the sarcophagus in which repose the ashes of Napoleon Bonapart―for whose ambition Europe was once too small.
17
The sight of his tomb awakened in me a sense of reverence and of melancholy. Tolstoi, in his War and Peace, belittles the genius of Napoleon as if he were no bigger, but only more fortunate, than his contemporaries. But a man who could raise himself from the position of a corporal to the imperial eminence of the conqueror of Europe―a man who, in spite of his sins and blunders, has enthroned himself in the imagination and affection of an enlightened nation―this man was a genius, if ever there was one.
18
The statue of Napoleon I, which now stands over the facade fronting the Esplanade, was the first that capped the Vendome Column. It was taken down by Louis XVIII, makes room for the statue of Henry IV, Napoleon III placed on the column another statue of great uncle in the garb of a Roman general, and set up the original one in front of the Arc de Triomphe. But during the German invasion of '71, it was taken down and hidden under the Pont Concorde for 6 months. After the conclusion of peace the statue was placed where it now stands.
19
6. The Palais du Conseil d'Etat. Nothing but the fine masonry now remains, the relic of the communistic flames of 71. To be pulled down next month.
20
7. The Halles Centrales. The biggest market I have ever seen. Ten pavilions separated from each other by wide covered avenues. Each pavilion contains 250 stalls each measuring 40 feet. Baedeker gives that about 15,000 vehicles are employed in the market traffic. The daily bill of Paris for meat, wine and bread in roughly estimated about 3 million francs. The wholesale traffic stops at 8 a.m. sharp. The produce left over at that hour is taken charge of by the police authorities and sold at auction for the benefit of the charitable institutions of Paris. By the way, it is interesting to know that the women of the market, or "Les Femmes des Halles," played the terrible role in 1789.
21
Among the women of the market is said to be found a large number of very rich folks. They own some of the finest diamonds and laces in Paris. The market women are noted for their quick wit and sharp tongues. When you should find favor in their sighs, they would honor you with the endearing terms of a "little cat," a "little rabbit," a "little cabbage, or a little chicken," etc.
22
Frogs dressed and snails on sale in the market. Cats are often served in lower grades of restaurants for rabbits. I am glad I have never formed a partiality for a hare. Horse meats for sale―not in the market―but in some meat shops. Mules and donkeys also contribute their meats to the delicacies of the Parisian dish―no doubt among the lower classes.
23
Our guide told us that in 71, during the siege, he had paid 50 francs for a leg of dog.
24
8. Cemetery of Pere la Chaise: 110 acres. Each vault admits 12 bodies. About 500 frs □ yard. Was in '71 the last stronghold of the communists.
25
9. Buttes Chanmont. N.E. of Paris. A most lovely park with grottoes, waterfalls, walks. Napoleon III laid out this park at a great cost for the benefit of the poorer classes inhabiting this part of the metropolis. The site originally a quarry, from which came the stones which adorn the fronts of many of the large buildings in Paris. In this part of the town children, or rather street arabs, run after the excursion carriages for miles simply for a sou. Our guide repeatedly warned us against them, whose hands always feel at home in people's pockets.
26
10. Place de la Bastille. On the spot where once stood the state prison of that name, is now occupied by a monument 154 ft. hight.
 
27
Home 6:30 p.m.
 

10. 9월 20일

1
20th. Sunday. Showery-cold.
 
2
Showers every day since last Thursday.
3
Worshipped in the church of L'Etoile. It was a delightful surprise to me to see in this catholic city a protestant sanctuary filled with the atmosphere of simple reverence and worship. The mumber of female worshippers far exceeded that of men. It looked very unbecoming to see two men standing at the door each with a collection bag. All collections should have been taken up in the church.
 

11. 9월 21일

1
21st. Monday. Chilly and cloudy.
 
2
This day last month I reached Paris.
3
All the day long I have been so homesick and sad that I feel almost like crying. Rainy evening.
 

12. 9월 22일

1
22nd. Tuesday. Cold-showery.
 
2
Even in beautiful Paris, continual rain and drizzle make things gloomy.
3
Took a disagreeable walk after dinner; there can be no other sort of walk in miserable weather.
4
It is regrettable that I ever assumed Christian vows. But, having once assumed honestly, no doubt, those holy vows, it is still more regrettable that I should have failed to keep them. It would be most regrettable, however, if I were to give them up because of a failure. A spider which succeeded in climbing up a smooth pillar at its 13th effort after 12 failures taught Robert Bruce the lesson of perseverance―a lesson that King Bruce turned to a good account. May I not learn from the insect the same lesson and, in the name of the merciful God, press forward to the attainment of a noble life? Yes I will.
5
This evening at the dinner table. Miss Schmidth, in speaking of the anxious interest which her aunt takes in her, said. "She is too anxious. She thinks I am not what is it in English?" I, fool that I was, I thought I could help out her English by saying, "She thinks you are not old enough." I must have remembered that young ladies never like to be thought "old enough."
 

13. 9월 23일

1
23rd. Wednesday. Rainy and chilly.
 
2
Rain and wind. Blow ye winds, pour ye rains! The weeping of the one and the sighing of the other well enough accord with my melancholy state of mind.
3
Wrote and mailed letters to my father and mother, to Messrs. Stein and Min. Also a card to Dr. Candler.
 

14. 9월 25일

1
25th. Friday.
 
2
Rained hard all day long―steady and cold wind to boot. They say it was so warm this time last year that one could hardly stay at the dinner table longer than was absolutely necessary. But now the table is turned the other way.
3
According to the lunar calendar, this evening a year ago, I went to the residence of Ishitsuka, the Japanese adviser to the Cabinet, to drink a farewell glass to Yu Kil Chun. He was to, or he gave it out that he was to, leave Seoul early next morning for Wuichoo; There were present besides the two named above, Pak Yi Yang ( ) , Yu Sei Nam ( ) , and one or two others whom I have forgotten. Much of our talk was on the ill fillings then raging between soldiers and police, on the current evils of the court etc. Ishitsuka, in wishing a good journey to Yu Kil Chun said, "I prophesy that you will be back in Seoul before 3 months be out." About 10 p.m., when we came out, Yu Kil Chun and I walked together as far as the street which branches off to my home from Antong. The moon was glorious. At my earnest request he exchanged his saddle with mine. That night the dreadful tragedy was to be enacted in the Palace and Yu Kil Chun was one of the principal promoters of the plot!
4
At 8 p.m. went down to Madame Livonsteine, parlor and had a pleasant soiree. There were present an old colonel who belongs to the Legion of Honor, his daughter, a Swede and another young man. The young lady, just half a year this side of sweet sixteen, is one of the prettiest Parisians I have seen. Her oval face of a healthy complexion, her pretty little mouth like a cherry cut in halves, her dark, big eyes, shaded with long silken eyelashes, sparkling with the vivacity of a French belle, her shapely hands and feet, her figure, neither thick nor thin, and, above all, her natural manners and exquisite smiles―in fact she was the evning star of the little party.
5
The conversation, so far as I could make out, began on the subject of music. Then the Swedish gentleman, who spoke little French, remarked on how heavily German ladies walk compared to their light-footed Parisian sisters. The Americans love of travel, the roughness of the northern waters, the inferior accommodations on the French railroad, supplied in turn rather dry subjects to a dragging conversation. Returned to my room at 10.
6
A regular winter night this is; the wind is high, the sky is low, the night is dark and most of us are very blue.
 

15. 9월 26일

1
26th. saturday.
 
2
A chilly and gloomy morning succeeded by a rainy afternoon and night. Pretty cold outside. Many thinks that the end of the world had come, sure enough.
3
According to the lunar calendar, this is the anniversary of the death of Her Majesty, the late Queen of Corea. What a storm of life she had and what a hurricane of death!
4
She was a wonderful woman. Mr. Min told me that ever since the violent death of her brother about 20 years ago, she had not been able to sleep in the night. When she rose in the morning about 11, after a rest of a few hours, her hours were taken up in reading and writing private letters, in examining all state papers, in transacting all the state business, from the appointment of a "seuri (胥吏) " or a clerk to the negotiation of foreign treaties. She could not only read the Chinese classics but knew by heart their principal passages. She was well up in the Corean and Chinese histories. Often she would help her maids in tying fancy knots with the Corean purse cords.
 

16. 9월 27일

1
27th. Sunday. Sunny a.m. but cloudy afternoon.
 
2
At 9 a.m. called on Lieutenant Uriu, the Japanese naval attache. Accepted his invitation and took lunch at ( ) . After which walked down to Boul de Contrescarpe to see Susan and Paul, the two children of Mrs. Schmidt, the sister in law of Miss Schmidt. Thence, about 4 p.m. with Mr. Schmidt went to the Jardin des Plantes. Sawthe zoological collections; the cedar of Lebanon which Bernand brought from Palestine in his hat but which now, after 141 years, no hat, or any number of hats, could hold; the beautiful specimens of different plants from all climes the hundreds of men and women and children who throng the walks without touching a single blade of grass or a petal of flower.
3
1. This morning I saw, at Urius in a Japanese paper of the 18th of August a telegram from Seoul, dated the 17th of August to the effect that Hong Chong Woo, backed by Sin Kui Sun and Yi Chai Soon, had started the persecution of so called Pro-Japanese party, and that etc. had to leave the capital for safety; that the Corean government had refused to concede to a Japanese company the construction of the Fusan-Seoul line of R.R.
4
2. I asked a toy seller in French, "How much do you want for that?"
5
The merchant, "Two sous for one."
6
I. "That is too much. I'll give you 30 centimes for two!"
7
3. T.H.Y.: "Isn't the Daily Messenger an English paper? Lieutenant Uriu "Yes."
8
T.H.Y.: "Does it come out every day?"
 
9
I call such nonsenses a simple stupidity and a stupid simplicity.
10
Miss Schmidt: "That has big eyes." in English. Paul (3 1/2 years old) "Non, c'est un bison!"
 

17. 9월 28일

1
28th. Monday. Positively cold.
 
2
No rain but cold as a winter day.
3
This morning Plancon, on his way to London, came to see me. Was really glad to see him here in Paris. He told me that Joo S.M. and Min K.S. are doing but very poorly in Petersburg; that they don't do anything at all; that Joo pays every few days 5 Rs. to a doctor for a consultation whereas only 1 R. is a customary fee.
 

18. 9월 29일

1
29th. Tuesday. Cloudy and cold.
 
2
One should not expect to have all the comforts and luxuries of the Parisian life for 5 francs a day. I have to therefore, put up with many a discomfort in my pension. Yet I am often tempted to seek another place, and I would if I were sure of finding an agreeable landlady. Miss Schmidt, the mistress of this establishment, is young, and in spite of her angular features, almost pretty, especially when dressed up. But she is a regular scold. Her temper seems so sour. Her laughter itself is a grating, metallic sound. The unsavory proximity of my little room to the kitchen compels me to hear the pricking and biting notes of the young lady's wrangle with Marie, who is, by the way, the cook, the chambermaid, the washerwoman, the porter and the table waiter, all in one person. Not a meal passes but our scold finds some occasion or other to blame the cook, to the spoliation of my appetite.
3
Miss Schmidt seems to be struggling to make both ends meet. That may go far to ensure her temper, though if she were sweeter, she might get more boarders.
4
As I see everywhere men and women struggling against the surges of "life's fitful sea" so full of physical ills and moral evils, temporal wants and spiritual needs, I can't help thinking that very, very few out of the millions and billions of human beings in the world have any reason at all for thanking God for their existence.
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◈ 윤치호일기 (1896년) ◈

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