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◈ 윤치호일기 (1893년) ◈

◇ 11월 ◇

해설목차  1권  2권  3권  4권  5권  6권  7권  8권  9권  10권  11권 12권  윤치호

1. 11월 1일

1
1st. Tokio, Japan
 
2
At breakfast a hotelmaid told me that American food thrice a day would kill her in a short while.
3
Visited the Kwannon Temple of Asakusa, the most popular Buddhist shrine in Japan. Stationed in a retired place I observed the crowd of worshippers with interest. As a worshipper comes in he or mostly she throws a "bunkiu" (2 mills) into a large box placed in front of the main entrance. A bit of incense dust in then thrown into a bronze grate with many a bow. Then she goes close to the alter as a low railing around it permits. There either kneeling or standing she first claps her hands once or twice, then rubs them, the vigor with which she does so being the index to the temperature of her devotion. In the meantime "Namuami tabutsu" is repeated either with or without beads. The whole exercise lasts only a few minutes. A Japanese temple is entirely free from the repulsive sights and smells that one meets with in a Chinese temple.
4
There is a wooden idol near the alter whose features are all rubbed off by the constant touch of the devotees who rub such part of the idol as corresponds to their diseased member of members.
5
It is a beautiful thing in Catholic and Buddhistic worship that the sanctuary with its sacred influence and associations is always open to the worshippers. While it is to be regretted that in our Eastern countries religion and morality are so far separated that a person who has passed the preceeding night in the wildest debauchery often appears the next morning a most devout worshipper in a temple, we must remember that religion should be the resort of consolation and of peace to troubled souls. But as religion enforces its moral requirements, as it must, its consolation is necessarily restricted to those alone who may more or less comply with its ethical conditions. This is a necessary evil.
6
Spent the whole morning in the Asakusa Park in witnessing some of the numerous shows of marvellous skill and of astonishing cheapness. One may stay whole day in a single place seeing endless variety of thrilling performances for a cent! There is no country like Japan in the world where one may get so much pleasure of the life with so little money!
7
It is to me an intense delight to walk about in a Japanese city. The people seem to be so happy. Very seldom any ugly noise jars your ears. You may wander about 24 hours without hearing or seeing a child cry. Even in the poorer streets the odors are rather agreeable than sickening such as you have to smell in a Chinese or a Corean street(?) The hotel keepers, shop-keepers, coolies even are so polite and obliging that it is pleasure to pay them for their services. The quietness of the streets is another attraction. True there is a deal of activity in main thorough-fares. Yet one hears no clang and crash; but only geta―geta―geta―geta (which sound I have a strange liking for) . In a bazaar I was constantly delighted and astonished at the beauty of little things and their cheapness. Japan is a great country for little things. Japan imports iron, steamers, rails and other heavy goods. She exports silk handkerchiefs and such pretty little handi-works. Yet her export exceeds her import! A wonderful fact.
8
If I had means to choose my home at my pleasure, Japan would be the country. I don't want to live in China with its abominable smells or in America where racial prejudice and discrimination hold their horrid sway, or in Corea as long as its infernal government lasts. O blessed Japan! The Paradise of the East! The Garden of the World!
9
1. Nothing can surpass the gracefulness of a pretty Japanese girl in her best attire. Stars save Japan from the evil day when her fair women shall disfigure themselves with European dress.
10
2. The custom of blackening the teeth of a married woman is one that ought to go. Nor do I like the shaving of the eyebrows of a child.
11
3. In Tokio at least, the partition wall between the male and female apartments in a bath house is by far more complete than even five years ago. I remember having bathed in one apartment with women.
12
4. Many a man goes bare-headed, while comparatively few wear socks at all.
13
5. A cart man leads instead of driving his horse or ox.
14
6. Every morning, every corner and nook of every house on every street are dusted and swept. The wooden floors, furniture and walls shine like a metal by reason of constant rubbing with wet rags.
15
7. One good thing is that while I was in Japan no one noticed me with so much curiosity as they did in the South. I could feel at home in Japan.
16
8. It is remarkable that there is in the Japanese language no such vile words as are so common in Chinese and Corean. When a Japanese wants to "cuss" he has to borrow the ugly expressions from English or Chinese.
17
9. Drinking with the Japanese is exceedingly social. With the European or American it is vice without the merit of being social at least among the lower classes. When I see a jinrikisha man sit by his little fire box with his wife and friends and drinks his little cups of sake forgetting, in the meanwhile, all the cares of life I can hardly have the harshness to tell him that it is sin to drink.
 

2. 11월 2일

1
2nd. Thursday.Tokio, Japan
 
2
Having spent last night in 山城軒, as soon as the breakfast was over, I went to Maruzen book-store for my International Dictionary. Thence I took the 8 a.m. train for Yokohama. When I got through with repacking. I returned to Tokio in the afternoon.
3
Called on R.W. Ibuka, the President of Meiji Gakuin. Found his wife a sweet little woman and him a pleasant man. When I told him the accusations which Buddhists brought against Missionaries in Japan during the Parliament of Religion, he said "They lied!"
4
Called on Mr. Pak. Found him having a goodtime with a bottle or two of beer. The two girls of the house are sweet and pretty. They captivated me.
 
5
This and that:―
6
1. There are, it is said, 180,000 geishas 130,000 prostitutes in Japan. A Japanese counts the cheapness and abundance of prostitutes as one of Japan's glories. In every city the most flourishing quarter is that devoted to the houses of ill fame. In some islands between Yokohama and Nagasaki, when a s.s. arrives a whole lot of girls some of whom are no older than 13 or 14 come on board to force the passengers to the trade. Mr. Neezima was right when he said that licentiousness is a leading sin of Japan.
7
2. The Japanese call a water closet a "Zozuba" or a place for handwashing. A strange place for that! Yet this alone shows the cleanliness of the Japanese as he washes his hand every time he goes to the watercloset.
8
3. The practice of mercenary conversion has been so common with the refugees that they look upon my sincerity of profession with a sort of wonder and pity.
 

3. 11월 3일

1
3rd. Tokio, Japan
 
2
At 8 a.m., Mr. Pak and I went to a European restaurant(西洋料理屋) . When we got through the breakfast we parted for good. Called on Mr. 柳衡魯. He, Mr. Ono and I went to Kanasugi(金杉汐湯屋) to see Mr. K.O.Q. Had to stay until after dinner.
3
Mr. K. was very guarded in his reference to Mr. Pak. He spoke of establishing a water work in Pekin with his characteristic hopefulness. He said that it is well enough for me to be a Christian as Christianity will spread in the East, but that it is a bother that I should believe so honestly. He asked me to stay one more night with him.
4
At 3 p.m. according to a previous engagement, I went to Mr. Ibuka's home. He had a social party to which the teachers of Meiji Gakuin and a few missiouaries and as many Japanese. Tea, cakes and fruits were served. The meeting was a 'bust' as the foreigners couldn't be at ease with their legs twisted in the Japanese fashion while their presence threw a kind of stiffness over the natives. This being the Emperor's birthday, the streets were gay with flags.
5
Went to Mr. K.'s quarters after dark. Met Ka-ih(甲斐軍治) . He told me that I 1882 the ratio of Corean money to Japanese Yen was 千兩 for 500 "Yen". In 1893, 25 or 23 Yen are exchanged for 千兩. That Corea has more arable land than Japan, that the former could easily support another ten millions. That in Kumamoto where the supply of labor exceed the demand, are old woman or a child who must consume 3 or 4 Yen's worth of rice per month, idle or no idle, goes to a factory and pays a dollar or two for work and board.
 

4. 11월 4일

1
3th. Saturday.Tokio; Yokohama; Train.
 
2
At 8 a.m. Ka-ih san set Mr. 柳 and me up to a European breakfast in the Tokio Hotel. They charged 50 Sen for a very poor meal per capita.
3
Mr. K.O.Q. insisted on my staying in Tokio until the 14 November. But knowing the danger of idleness on my mind and religion I decided to leave Tokio at once.
4
Mr. K. well said that Corea is worse than hell because in hell men are punished with reference to justice while in Korea torture and death are dealt out regardless to reason or justice.
5
Left Tokio by the 11:40 a.m train. Ka-ih san kindly escorted me to the Shinbashi station. Left Yokohama for Kobe on the 10:30 p.m. To kaito train. The 3rd class cars were over crowded. The fear of being robbed kept me awake most of the night, as I was warned by the clerks and hotel maids and travelers to beware of pickpockets and robbers. They told me never eat anything that a stranger may hand me in the train.
 

5. 11월 5일

1
5th. Sunday. Train. Kioto
 
2
The scene along the road was really charming. The rice fields and vegetable gardens that cover every inch of available ground are as neatly culivated as a flower garden. Passed many a substantial country town that speaks well of the old civilization of happy Japan.
3
Reaching Kioto at 3 p.m., I went straight to Aishigawa Hotel near the Station. After bath and supper went to Doshisha to attend an evening service. But there being no service in the college, went to 洛陽會社 to witness the dedication service. Two native preachers and Dr. Gordon spoke. The first one put everybody to sleep. Dr. Gordon's talk was good. Rev. 三宅, a little fellow who reminded me of Bro. Win Jonier woke up everybody by a pointed sermon well seasoned with witty remarks.
4
This day or rather this night 5 years ago I reached Nashville and called on Dr. W. Louis, who then lived near the Vanderbilt style.
 

6. 11월 6일

1
6th. Monday.Kioto
 
2
At 7, went to Doshisha. Attended the morning service in the College chapel. The scene transported me for a moment to the Day Chapel of Emory College. At the end of devotional exercises a Y.M.C.A. man was introduced to talk a little to the students. The young man showed a lack of commonsense, at least for the time being, by a dreadfully long talk in a tone that was hardly audible but to a few near the platform.
3
After the Chapel, visited the different buildings of the College. Was surprised to see the splendid brick structures. There are said to be 600 students in all of whom 400 are Christians. 100 theologues out of this number of Christians are encouraging.
4
Called on but missed Mrs. Neezima. From her home went to the cemetary where Dr. Neezima is buried. Was very much touched to come across Mr. George Foulk' s grave. I had known him well when he was in the American navy and served for some time as an acting minister to Corea. He married a Nagasaki girl in 1886 or there abouts, resigning in the meantime his position in the navy. I had not heard anything of him until I came to Japan. There I was told that he became a zealous believer in Christ and taught for some years in Doshisha. Last summer he went among the mountains of Hakone and there he was one day found dead―how nobody knows. How sad! A kindlier man never lived.
5
Visited the famous Higashi Yama and its temples. Each one of these temples are kept in the most charming cleanliness. The silence of a Japanese temple broken only by the wind passing through bamboo groves and cedar forests evokes feelings of reverence inspite of our will.
6
Kioto is the headquarters of the Japanese Buddhism. Priests live in this sacred city by thousands. Beef restaurants are exceedingly rate.
 
7
The wonderful success of Doshisha is commonly ascribed to:
8
1. The lofty character and holy zeal of Dr. Neezima.
9
2. His intimacy with the leading men in the government.
10
3. Absence of competition.
11
4. The influence of the Kumamoto Band.
12
5. Wide advertisement by the teachers and preachers the College have sent out.
13
Reluctauly did I leave Kioto for Kobe at 3.p.m. Reached the later place at 6.
14
As soon as I got settled in the Nakai Hotel, I went out to see the streets etc. Called on Dr. Hashimoto. Found him fat and happy. He has a deal of the old man in him that secures his worldly success. He and family welcomed me as if I were a member of their household.
 

7. 11월 7일

1
7th. Tuesday.Kobe
 
2
At 9 a.m. went out to Kwansai Gakuin. Brother Yoshioka extended me a hearty welcome. So did Brother Demaree, Dr. Newton and Brother Bradbury.
 
3
Had a profitable talk with Brother Yoshioka. He said:
4
1. That there are 50 students in the school all of whom are Christians.
5
2. That Congregational missionaries do live in lazy extravagance. Methodists work harder.
6
3. A native preacher stands in a very delicate position.
7
4. Rowland, the ex-missionary who was sent home disgraced wad guilty of immoral intercourse with Mrs. Duke. The secret has been concealed even from Yoshioka; but the young native whom R. employed to copy out his confession gave air to the whole affair.
8
5. Every summer missionaries all over so. Japan go to Arima Springs for the ostentatious purpose of attending a summer prayer meeting. But more harm is done by their luxuirous and lazy living than good accomplished by their devotions. The Gakuin students most of whom struggle through the school by hard work and self-denial are by all means discouraged from going to Arima as the sight of the ease loving missionaries is bound to weaken their faith.
9
6. Most missionaries criple their usefulness by their lack of adaptability. Many a native brother has been offended by what missionaries think to be chivalrous acts toward their wives such as walking behind them or pulling off, or putting on their shoes. While this is all right, a missionary, whose business it is to become all things unto all men for their good might deny himself such chivalrous acts as might be dispensed with without any real harm to a lady.
10
7. That he never wears hakama when he preaches to and audience known to be composed of merchant class.
11
8. That ladies who have been missionaries in China make themselves unpopular by their haughty behavior.
 
12
At the request of Brother Yoshioka, I gave g short talk on the parliament of Religion before the theologues. Supped at Dr. Hashimoto's. After supper the Doctor, his family, Brother Yoshioka and I went to our church to attned a preaching service. Went home with Brother Y.
13
A pretty day and a cold night.
 

8. 11월 8일

1
8th. Wednesday.Kobe, Japan
 
2
Rained most of the day. After breakfast, called on Mr. Yeita (飯田勇) , a friend of Mr. Pak. Sought and interview with Mrs. Foulk in the training school for ladies. She was dressed in the homeliest style―a contrast to the gay and costly apparels she used to wear in "Okinsan" day. Her strange career, the pathetic death of her husband―all combined to move my feelings for her akin to affection. Dined with Brother Demaree and Dr. Newton. Met Brother Turner of Emory College.
3
Rained hard in the afternoon. Met Brother Moseley, a loveable man, who seems to know how to deal with the Japanese.
4
Brother Yoshioka, Mr. Sakurai, (a Doshisha man and the Chinese teacher in the Gakuin) kindly took me to the Congregational Female School. The school is going to be better equipped than La Grange F.C. Took supper at Dr. Bradbury's. He is an accomplished gentleman and has a fine looking wife. She told me that she had visited Corea last summer. She praised the beauty of Corea, its fine climate and the splendid and exact figure of its people. I devoured these words like a hungry soul would a morsel of bread.
5
Spent the night with Brother Yoshioka.
 

9. 11월 9일

1
9th. Thursday.
 
2
At 9 a.m. gave a short talk to the students in the Chapel. Bidding the kind friends and brethren a reluctant farewell. I went down town to see Brother Hager. He have me a cordial welcome and introduced me to Brother Tague and wife. Brother Hager with his little wife and Mrs. Tague with her little husband presented a pleasent and amusing cntrast. The young couples seemed to be delighted with the prospect of their work.
3
Visited the Nunobiki Falls which are so much talked of in Kobe. Whether it was the worn out condition of my health or the steep hills that I was compelled to climb or both, I did not enjoy my trip. In fact the Falls are not worth much, but the drive from the town to the foot of hill is very fine.
4
At 6 p.m. with Brother Yoshioka went to No. 9 to take tea with Brother Turner and wife and Mrs. Hanger. Brother Hager was absent in Osaka. Met Mrs. Shaw whom I heard much of while in Japan. She was once a teacher in La Grange F.C.; but her love of art as well as of Christ led her to Japan where she married Brother Shaw, an Emory boy. Both of them seem to be wedded to their work. Brother Shaw is said to be thinking of adopting the native costume and food. Mrs. Hager does not seem to be much of a missionary.
5
Reverend Newton is the leader in our Mission. I was not much impressed with either Brother Turner or Callahan.
6
To be a missionary in Japan is a holiday affair. No wonder many think to have been "called" to that delightful land.
7
At 8 p.m. Dr. Hashimoto and Brother Yoshioka escorted me to the S.S. Kobemaru.
8
The 2nd class accommodations of Kobemaru is excellent.
 

10. 11월 12일

1
12th. Sunday.Nagasaki
 
2
The voyage from Kobe to Bakwan was a delightful affair. But the s.s. had to stop over at the above named port from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. of the 11th in order to avoid the Genkainada storm.
3
Reached Nagasaki at 8 a.m. After breakfast, went ashore to deliver a package of two from Brother and Mrs. Yoshioka to Miss Okasima Onaru in the Methodist Girls School. Attended the morning worship at the Tezima Methodist Church. Dr. Carol(?) preached a long sermon in remarkably good Japanese. After the service called on Nagami and found him in Horaiya on Maruyama. He welcomed me with his characteristic gush. Ate dinner with him.
4
He told me that his father lives in a "besso" with a concubine; that his oldest brother-in-law had been divorced from his sister by the command of his father; that Ochiyei his youngest sister always speaks of me in the kindest terms. He has a wife, yet he spends or rather wastes his time and money with dissolute women and worse men of Maruyama. In the face of such facts, Herai had the cheek enough to tell the Chicagoans that in Japan women enjoyed equality with nay superiority to men!
5
In a bathhouse I saw a pretty young woman in all her alluring nudity. The indifference with which a Japanese can look upon such sight is due to his vice rather than his virture. He is indifferent not because he can easily control his passion but because he can easily gratify it. For any desire that we have power to gratify anywhere and anytime never gets violent. But the nudity of pretty women which we witness in bathhouses and elsewhere in Japan is certainly a trying temptation to one upon whose passion a social or especially religious check is laid. All honor to the young Japanese Christians who can go through these fiery trials unhurt!
6
Left Nagasaki at 6 p.m.
 

11. 11월 14일

1
14th. Tuesday.Kobemaru, Shanghai
 
2
The voyage was very rough until the middle of last night.
3
A beautiful morning. Reached Woosong a little before 12 a.m.; but the tide was too low, had to wait until 3 p.m. Landed on Shanghai at 4:30 p.m. Went straight to Tokiwaya, a Japanese inn.
4
As soon as settled in regard to my room etc., called on Professor N.B.B. He and his wife were as cordial as could be. What ever may be his short comings as a missionary to the Chinese so uncongenial to him. I can not help loving him as a friend any more than I could breathing.
5
If the first sensations I had on arriving at Japan were those of pleasure and delight: those I experience at the sight of the surging crowd of the Chinese this evening were pain and disgust. In going through a Japanese street I could not help being happy, having all my senses open to enjoy the neat and pretty things everywhere. In a Chinese street how can I help being sulky and uncomfortable when I have to stop my nose and close my eyes in order to avoid if possible the dreadful smells and repulsive sights on all hands. If I ever blamed anybody for disliking China at first sight, I take all back.
6
Took tea with Brother Loehr and Dr. Allen.
 

12. 11월 15일

1
15th. Wednesday.Shanghai
 
2
Ran about all day to buy necessary things for my rooms. I felt so strange and lonesome! Everything here is so old (to me) yet so new and so new yet so old. I felt at loss. Was miserable wherever I went. This state of mind was largely due to the fact:
3
1. That the Chinese are very rude to a stranger. The store keepers I had to deal with are so sulky and so disobliging and so dishonest. Certainly lying is the besetting sin of this people.
4
2. That wherever there are a number of the Chinese gathered in a tea shop or in a school there is filth. In the College the pavement and step in the water closet are literally covered with dung. The Chinese boy (man too) would rather urinate against the building than into a urinary tub next to him.
5
3. With all my cosmopolitan indifference to any decent food of any people I find it almost impossible to eat the Chinese food seeing, as I do, the cook preparing it. The Chinese is perhaps the filthiest people in the world excepting possibly the Coreans! Even the latter are better the former in some things. For instance at the same spot in a dirty creek, you see one Chinese wash his old clothes, another his feet, another his urine pot, another his dung tub, another his vegetables and another his rice! That same water is carried by a water drawer into a house to be drunk. A Corean would not go this far at least.
6
4. The contemptible and beggary pride of this dirty people plumming themselves as the "righteous" and "good" and "pure" and "honest" nation in the world is simply ridiculous and abominable.
7
5. Like all base natures and therefore unlike the Japanese, the only means to make the average Chinese Trades man etc. to keep their word is cash or kick. They have so long been used to cheat and cheating that they cannot understand you if you want to be honest and square.
8
6. The language of China is as full of dirty and filthy expressions as her government is of bribery and corruption. Not a little child girl or boy opens his or her mouth without flinging out a mouthful of dirty words for which the Japanese or the English language is too decent. I do not suppose any language can translate them literally but Corean. Shame to Corea!
9
7. The chinese are a great people for quarrel thought not for blows. The boys in th College quarrel every day with the fellow who brings food from a chinese inn.
10
8. My ignorance of the language hinders me from under standing the better qualities of this people.
 
11
Attended the Chinese prayer meeting held in the College by Brother Loehr. In a private conversation he complained of the lack of zeal on the part of Prof. Bonnell; of the mistaken idea of a missionary teacher which Miss Mary Allen has etc.
12
Had a pleasant evening in the dinner party at Brother Loehr's.
 

13. 11월 17일

1
7th. Friday.Shanghai
 
2
A beautiful day for the Jubilee celebration of the Settlement of Shanghai. Every house and street were gaily decorated with lantern flags etc. But I felt too tired to run about. So I entertained myself most highly in looking over and putting in order my old books etc. after I had bought a dollar's worth of Jubilee stamps.
3
Brother Loehr offered to give me a room in his house until my room be fixed and Prof. Bonnell asked me to take meals with him. How kind they are! But to avoid even the appearance of being unfitted for the oriental modes of living by my American education. I refused both and took to the Chinese food. When I eat I have to shut my eyes to the man who brings the food and also to the vegetables etc. and then eat as quick as possible. I would enjoy the Chinese cooking if it were even a bit cleaner than it is. The food-carrier has a rag as black as coal. With it he wipes his sweat, his hands, his face, his nose, the bench, the table, the vessels and sticks. That is his idea of cleanliness. I would thank him very much if he did not stick his dirty and long finger nails into the soup, rice and vegetable. Oh me!
4
I have heard a great deal of talk about a foreign education spoiling an oriental. That is he wants or rather tries to be and American or an European in everything except in what is good. But I shall endeavor to be a Corean in everything except in what is essentially bad; and American in nothing except in what is essentially good; a Christian in all things.
 

14. 11월 21일

1
21st. Tuesday.Shanghai
 
2
There is a Corean in the College who came here about a month ago. His name is Ha Yong Do. His name betrays his common origin; his manner, his mean training; his language, his Keng Sang Do rusticity. He tells me that studied in the Methodist School at Seoul; that he left Corea because he could not learn English there; that he has neither parents nor patrons; and that he came to Shanghai trusting in luck. There is a lot of low cunning in him. That is what I do not like. Oh for a Corean who is straight forward!
3
At 10 with Ha, called on Dr. Fitch, the manager of the Presbyterian Mission Press, to thank him for his kindness to the young man in the past and find out any information concerning him that the Doctor might possess. Dr. Fitch promised to write to the Methodist missionaries at Seoul in regard to Ha.
4
Dr. Fitch seemed to think himself so far above me that he did not even offer me a chair. Well, he is an American and I, a Corean. Very true. But isn't he here as a Christian missionary? Isn' t it the ostentatious business of a missionary to teach us poor heathens a higher religion, a purer morality and better manners? If so this Doctor certainly set me and others of my complexion a very doubtful example of politeness this morning.
5
Dr. Allen asked me what I expected for my salary. I told him I did not expect anything. I am here for work, said I and not for money. God being my help I shall never quarrel about money while in the mission.
6
China is a fine place to learn and practise patience. There is no use for being mad. Go slow! Corea is in a worse fix than I feared.
 

15. 11월 23일

1
23rd. Thursday.Shanghai
 
2
A beautiful night. With Ha called on Mr. Chi Oon Yong in Nisshin Yoko, a Japanese hotel. He received me cordially and in course of conversation whose burden was the internal corruption and tyrany of the Corean government, he broke the new. that my mother had been―for some time. She waited on mother of Mr. Min Young Ik begging her to intercede with the Queen for my father's pardon. Lady Min undertook the task, being moved by the devotion of my mother. But the Queen proved a stone. When the news reached my mother that her majesty declined to pardon my father, she fainted away, her heart being broken.
3
Could that be possible? The dearest object of life to me―my mother gone! O Heavens! Couldn't this be a mere rumor such as the report of my death? Could it be that she only fainted and the report spread that she―? Oh intolerable this is! If she is gone, she is in heaven as sure as there is one. She couldn't go anywhere else; for no purer soul ever lived in a female frame than that of my mother.
4
It is unbearable to be alone. My mind must be constantly occupied with something else.
 

16. 11월 26일

1
26th. Sunday.Shanghai
 
2
After the morning services went to Dr. Allen's for dinner. Dinner over, the Doctor. Brother Loehr and I had a long talk about Oxford and Gerogia in general. I felt exceedingly home sick as the persons and scenes of the old College associations were recalled into vivid outlines by the talk.
 

17. 11월 28일

1
28th. Tuesday.Shanghai
 
2
After supper called on Professor Bonnell to consult him about starting a college paper etc. He told me that he and Dr. Allen had decided to give me30 per month.
3
At 9 received a letter from Leon H. Eax of Oxford. Never did I enjoy a letter more.
4
I don't know what to make out of Ha. He is not dull; but I can't vote him a bright and ambitious scholar. He tells me that the Methodist School at Seoul has lately found out the extreme folly of receiving boys on charity basis; that all the professed conversions in the mission is a sham out and out etc. Now I can't help distrusting a young man of Keng Snag Do dialect who says to have been a favorite with the missionaries. A boy once schooled in a place where dishonesty and hypocrisy and sycophancy proved a lucrative trade is a dangerous person to deal with.
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윤치호 일기 [제목]
 
윤치호(尹致昊) [저자]
 
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