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◈ 윤치호일기 (1893년) ◈

◇ 9월 ◇

해설목차  1권  2권  3권  4권  5권  6권  7권  8권  9권 10권  11권  12권  윤치호

1. 9월 1일

1
1st.Friday.Marion
 
2
Had a pleasant morning in playing the quotations with the ladies. A miserable weather―rain and mud.
3
Reached Marion at about 3 p.m. Reverend Callahan was gone without having told a single blessed soul about my appointment. I despise this class of preachers. After consulting with Bro. Brown and McDonald, the official members of the church, I went about posting up notices etc. Had a good turnout, in regard to number, very poor otherwise. Saw some of the rudest children in the crowd. Like priest, like people.
 

2. 9월 2일

1
2nd. Saturday.Bryson City
 
2
From 8 to 12 spent the hours in walking up and down the mountains. Marion had a boom a few years ago. A party started to build a fine hotel on a lovely site a mile from the town; but hard time overtook them before the house was completed. About 800 people. Marion is noted for the indifference and coldness of its chruch members.
3
Left Marion at 2 p.m. Reached Asheville at 4:30. The mountain scenery on the way passes description as the iron road winds up and down, right and left through the wild profusion of hills, streams, trees, farms and fields. Was astonished to find Asheville such a stirring business town. The houses perched on the hills surrounding the city, the paved streets, fine stores etc. make Asheville an attractive little town.
4
Reached Bryson City at 10:45 after a ride of 4 hours. Put up at Eutilla Hotel. Bro. Stedman whom I had seen in Raleigh owns the hotel and gave me a kind reception.
 

3. 9월 3일

1
3rd. Sunday.Bryson City
 
2
In these mountains the morning and evening air is very cool.
3
Was charmed with Bryson City. It is situated on the Tuckascige River with beautiful mountains on all sides. The people are intelligent and religious.
4
Called on Bro. Marr. He consented to give me the evening audience. After dinner at Bro. M.'s―which I enjoyed as much as his good sermon―spent most of the p.m. on the porch with Bros. M., Stedman and Thomason. The latter is a R and D conductor. He has religion enough to carry it in his R.R. business. His conversation showed that he is a good and sensible man. Bro. M. said that the people living among the mountains know not "hard time" having all of their wants supplied from their farms. That the hardtime will do good in teaching people that towns are not the only place for a living. Bro. Thomason said if a farmer would be as punctual in his work as a R.R. conductor is to keep the position, the former could soon buy out any R.R. man in the State. This statement may need modification; yet it has a fine moral for all.
5
Had one of the finest audiences I have had during the summer in matter of intelligence. The faintest hint of humor was caught and appreciated. What a refreshing contrast with the thick headed Marion crowd!
 

4. 9월 4일

1
4th. Monday.Murphy
 
2
Mrs. M. Stedman, the proprietor of the hotel, being a Methodist woman would not charge me anything for my lodging and board. But I urged her take at least the half rate.
3
Left Bryson City at 7:15. The grade between City and Murphy is very heavy and the road winds along the river course. The ride was long and tedious though the scenery along the road is charming all through. Reached Murphy at 1 p.m.
4
Found Bro. Cordell a cordial man. Though I had appointed the 5th Sept. for Murphy, I was so desirous to get through with my list that we agreed to have the lecture on the 4th. Had a good audience and appreciative.
 

5. 9월 5일

1
5th. Tuesday.Marietta, Ga
 
2
Left Murphy at 11 a.m. Reached Marietta at 6 p.m. Went straight to Mrs. Tucker's on Cherokee Street. She and her daughters welcomed me as if I were one of them. Miss Julie told me that they had looked for me in June and reserved my room hoping to see me before I should leave America. She is one of the most sweet young woman I have seen.
 

6. 9월 6일

1
6th. Wednesday.Atlanta. Oxford
 
2
Left Marietta at 10:15. Reached Atlanta at 11. Spent an hour or two in shopping.
3
At 2 called on Dr. Allen, but missed him. Met Mrs. Allen and Miss Mary.
4
Reached Oxford at 6 p.m. Felt almost like returning home. Mrs. Perry gave me a warm welcome and so did the little girls, Luddie calling me "babie".
5
Called on Dr. Candler and was happy to see his family all well. Mrs. Curtwright and Miss Fonzie at home.
6
Thank God for his kind Providence that has kept me from harm and given me the success I had during the summer. How tedious and dreary the work did look when I started out with a list of over 50 places. But I am here safe and sound having realized3―which help me back to the East. God bless the pastors and people of N.C. and Va. who gave me the kind encouragement I needed! May I prove true to my God and to my church!
7
Felt happy once more to attend the Wednesday prayer meeting in the old church. Prof. Dicky gave a good talk in which he delivered some straight remarks on the indifference of Oxford Methodists. Among other things he said he didn't know any other place he would not be willing to bring up a child rather than in Oxford. The attendance was very slim.
 

7. 9월 7일

1
7th. Thursday.Oxford
 
2
A cloudy and warm day.
3
Revelled in figs and skerponongs in Dr. C.'s yard. Made social calls.
4
Took supper at Prof. Dicky's. He is a talented young man. His popularity as a teacher is waning fast, though. Boys complain that he is too haughty, overbearing. A few years of experience may set him right. Prof. Ino Bonnell is reported (by Prof. D.) to have said that I know what I know and don't know what I don't, that very few men can do that. Am flattered by the compliment.
5
Prof. D. gave several Shakespearian quotations at the table. That didn't suit my taste as well as his supper.
6
Mr. Berry gave me a bookmark with my initials on it and Tommie a pin for the tie. I appreciate them very much.
7
Called on Dr. C. after supper and gave him30, the tenth of my net earning of the summer to be added to the fund of200.
 

8. 9월 11일

1
11th. Monday.Oxford
 
2
Rained all day. Rain and mud looks very natural in Oxford.
3
Spent most of the day in Dr. C.'s study and Mrs. N.C.'s room, in the exceedingly happy company of Mrs. N.C., Fonzie and John. Emory added liveliness to the circle.
4
John, "Mr. Yun, what instrument can you play?"
5
T.H.Y. "F-o-o-l".
6
Called on Misses Emmie and Sallie Stuart to bid them goodbye. They were very kind indeed. Took supper with them. Miss E.S. gave me a fine picture of her home and in the name of her family, a fine pocket knife of 4-blades. As I came out she said "We shall always remember your bright and cheerful face".
7
Returned to Mrs. N.C.'s room. Played the game of quotations with John. Mrs. N.C. said that she was sorry that she hadn't been more kind to me. God bless her!
8
Mrs. N.C. "What is milk of human kindness?"
9
T.H.Y. "A mother's".
10
"I wouldn't" said Mrs. N.C. fondling her fine baby, "take a million for my baby, but wouldn't give a dime for a dozen of him".
 

9. 9월 13일

1
13th. Wednesday.Atlanta etc.
 
2
After bidding a reluctant good-bye to Dr. and Mrs. N.C. I spent last night with L.H. Eax. Up at 4:15 a.m. to be ready for departure. A cup of hot coffee would have been very welcome before starting, such act of womanly thoughtfulness couldn't be expected of Mrs. Berry. Her friendship is of selfish and material kind better suited to the cheek and brass of Bell than to my sensitiveness.
3
I had expect a welcome reception and hospitable entertainment at the hand of Mrs. B.;but was disappointed. She loves Bell too well to like me. Tomnie was with her; but I was surprised at my own indifference to the girl. I couldn't possibly persuade myself to love her. 1 parted with both with no regret or pain.
4
Leaving Cov. at 6 a.m. reached Claskston at 7:30. Went straight to a Mr. William's to call on Miss Edna Ferguson. For my sake she didn't go to the school and most sweetly entertained me for two hours (how short they seemed!) . Happy will be the man who gets her.
5
Reached Atlanta about 11 a.m. Called on Dr. Allen and took dinner with him. Mrs. Allen was busy in breaking up her housekeeping.
6
Left Atlanta by the 7:15 train for Nashville.
 

10. 9월 14일

1
14th. Thursday.Nashville Tenn
 
2
Reached Nashville at 6 a.m. Went at once to Mrs. A.H.'s on the Belmont's car. The joy I felt on seeing Mrs. A.H. might better be imagined than expressed.
3
Called on Dr. Lambuth after breakfast and also on the W.H. ladies. Dr. Tillet was very kind to me giving me many valuable informations concerning the W.C. Fair.
4
Declined all invitations to meals in order to be with Mrs. A.H. as much as possible. After supper she was kind enough to talk with me on the front porch. Among other things she said:
5
1. That Mrs. Anna M. Brown had became such a source of trouble and annoyance to the missionaries on account of her unruliness that it was thought best to call Bro. Br. home.
6
2. That fifteen years ago when Dr. H. and she were in San Francisco there was only a handful of South, Methodists. Such was the poverty of the people that, one Sunday morning the stewards having failed to secure materials for the supper, she had to buy a bottle of wine from a saloon and a clean table cloth from a Jewess for the sacrament.
7
3. That Dr. Sam Steele is the most over-estimated man in the church.
8
4. That Washington J. Moore, the popular Vanderbilt graduate of '91, has proved himself a brilliant bust going from bad to worse.
9
5. That the Tenn. Methodist is one of the vilest religious sheets which she can't read without being indignant.
10
6. That the drudgery of life has robbed her of its poetry.
11
7. That she liked to live in San Franscico where people have to be up and doing whether they will or not.
12
I wished I could stay up all night and listen to that beloved woman―a friend indeed.
 

11. 9월 15일

1
15th. Friday.Nashville Tenn
 
2
After breakfast went to Vanderbilt and spent an hour or two with Jacob. It was refreshing to talk with that simple and religious soul.
3
Took dinner at Dr. Lambuth's. His wife is a pretty little woman. To my great surprise she said that the Chinese makes a stronger friend than a Japanese; that the Chinese are the coming nation in the East while Japan has never been nor will ever be a great country.
4
It pained me very much to leave Nashville or rather Mrs. A.H. so soon. But my time was limited and I had to start for Chicago Friday evening. Oh I felt so sad to tell her good-bye for―nobody knows how long! After getting settled in the train on opening my valise I found a small pocket Testament and Psalms with my name printed on the cover. On the fly-leaf Mrs. A.H.'s precious signature was found. God bless her!
 

12. 9월 24일

1
24th. Chicago Illinois
 
2
Just a week since my arrival to this World's Fair City. Things, Persons and Thoughts!
3
1. Chicago is the biggest city I have seen in America. The distances are amazing. Population 1,550,000.
4
2. Spent two days and two nights in the Fair. The magnificence of the buildings needs no poor description. The Chinese exhibit is very stupid. Except in ivory-carving, fineness or delicacy is not a part of the Chinese skill. Such a miserable grotesqueness in their China paintings! The Japanese exhibit is praised by everybody. Well may a Japanese be proud. Siam and Burmah are represented. Corea has a corner where are found the crude productions of the Corean skill or rather dullness. While I could not help blushing at the poverty of Corean arts etc. the sight of the Corean flags had a strong attraction to me.
5
The Midway Plaisance is a bust. The heathen and Mohammedan theatres are miserable spectacles. In the Congress Beauty there are some pretty girls, in different costumes. The Cantonese woman cuts a shamefully ugly figure in the Congress.
6
3. Attended the Religious Parliament for two successive days. The Parliament is a better affair than I had feared before I came. Some of the wise sayings and the otherwise.
7
(1) Mill. If we had lived as Christians ought to, a Parliament of Religions would have been impossible.
8
(2) Webb. A pure-minded man can be a polygamist and be a true and perfect Christian. (!)
9
(3) Peabody. "If Christanity takes no interest in social questions, those who are concerned in them will take no interest in Christanity. The individual is the means and the Kingdom the end. The church has been so impressed by the half of Christ's truth―the individualism―that it has altogether neglected the other half―socialism. Good men retreat from the world: thus unholy men have to work harder in order that saints might be idle. The Kingdom of Christ is not the coming of the self out of the consecrated society.
10
(4) Miss or Rev. Olivia Brown. It is the interest of every man that his neighbor's conduct be right, especially that of his ancestors. The hope of the world is free Motherhood(?) (!) .
11
(5) If God has provided medicine for curing sicknesses why didn't Christ use them? A poor argument by a Faith curer.
12
(6) Bishop Arnett, a colored Bishop. "I have been asked to speak on Christianity and the Negro. Christianity needs no defender; it will take care of itself if let alone. The Negro needs no defender; he will take care of itself; if let alone. "Neither needs me; but I need both. I need be a Negro to be on earth; I need Christianity to go to Heaven on. We have come here to study the great problem of God and religion from the West, from the North, from the East and―a few from the South. We Negroes don't mind be judged but we hate to be hung and then be judged. We shall all meet in Heaven with men from Ceylon's spicy isle, from India's coral strand (pointing to a Hindoo in scarlet robe) and those from America who may repent of their sins".(The Hall shook with cheers and applause) .
13
(7) Dr. Burrows. When I saw the eminent Catholic divine join hands with the eloquent Negro Bishop, I could not help saying in my heart "What God hath joined, let no man part".
14
4. Heard so much of liberal-mindedness; broadness; universal faith; humanity, fraternity; brotherhood of men; fatherhood of God; truth etc. etc. that I am tired of these terms. The one trouble in the Parliament is that it is so "broad" that it is too thin. The night Bishop Arnett spoke, the colored choir sung the old good hymn "All hail the power of Jesus' name". Most of the audience saying it with enthusiasm. "That hymn sounds very refreshing in this Hall" said I to a man by my side. "You are right" replied he. Broadness is good enough; but too much of it is a curse to a soul. Steam, electricity, heat, magnetism and other forces never accomplish a blessed thing until they are confined to a narrow space. I would rather be narrow and be earnest than be broad and be indifferent.
15
5. The English language is so rich that a man can get up any kind of nonsense and clothes it in fine phrases and pass if for wisdom!
16
6. A Japanese, Noya, whom I had met in the Tribune Office yesterday came and slept in my room. He disgusted me with his English―I despise anyone who affects other tongue when he can speak his own language. He said he had graduated in different colleges, a theological seminary included. He looks and acts too much like a sponger and time server. There is beggarly littleness in a Japanese despite of his agreeableness.
17
7. Fruits―watermelons, cantaloupes, grapes, apples, peaches, bananas etc. are abundant and cheep. A good meal be had for 20¢(Roast beef, Irish potatoes, coffee, light bread, etc.) . No biscuit as known in the South; no corn bread; no gravy; no colored waiters; comparatively little racial prejudice.
18
8. Called on Mrs. Bemis last Wednesday morning. She was as cordial and kind as ever.
19
9. Called on 鄭敬源 the Corean Commissioner this morning; but he did not see me on the ground that as a representative of the government he didn't think it right to see a man whose father is a political exile and who has been out of the country so long without any good cause(!) . From what I hear from Mr. Pack and Arn, the two underofficers of the Commissioner, Korea is exactly where I left her. How long―!
20
10. Mr. Pack 朴永 shows me a considerable sympathy. He has been sent here as a naval student. Oh my! A country which stands in the most crying needs of a postal system, of R. Roads, of trained custom officers, of teachers, of miners etc.―a country which has less use for a navy than for anything else should spend its money in training naval officers!!!
21
Misgovernment has its own punishment as any other crime. Centuries of despotism, injustice, cruelty and oppression have deprived the rulers and the ruled of their sense and reason and they are hastening to ruin and destruction by their own sins and follies. It's God's doing.
22
11. Walking along Wabash Ave. after ten in the night, many a "strange woman" is seen trying to get customers.
23
12. Rains often―damp―chilly―foggy every morning. Have been suffering from a bad cold for three days.
24
13. The presentations which different religions have made will no doubt shake the faith of many Christians. A lady said that if Buddhism is so good there was no use of sending missionaries. Many, especially women, seem to be crazy over the beautiful teachings of Buddah, Confucius and of Mohammed. Yet the good effects of the Parliament of Religions are:
25
(a) The American public is informed that the Oriental can and do think, reason, argue and write; that his systems contained truths which can not be disputed; that his prejudices and feelings ought to be handled gently and respected by Christian teachers.
26
(b) The thoughtful follower of the Savior is reminded that Christianity must be sent abroad in its simplicity, unclogged by traditions and unstained by abuses.
27
(c) The Church of Christ must be united if not in name, at least in spirit. One of the greatest hindrances to missionary work is the ugly sight of denominational competitions at home and abroad.
28
(d) The war between Christianity and other creeds has just begun. Inspite of all the sentimental talks I have heard in the past few days about universal fatih etc. etc., the war between Christianity and other creeds will go on until the latter triumphs. True, the war needs not be, will not be and ought not to be in bitterness and bloodshed. But to say that Christianity is to be contented with a compromise or toleration for its existence is contrary to its true spirit and history.
29
(e) To all thinkers as to Max Muller it must have been shown that Christianity is after all superior to any. If a Congress had been assembled to discuss or rather hear the presentations of the advocates of different systems of government, from the Constitutional monarchy of England to damnable autocracy of Corea each could have been defended and its merits shown. Yet no one will deny that the democracy of America is after all the best form of government inspite of its defects. So in a higher sense after all the allowances made to the excellency of other creeds it remains still true that Christianity beats them all.
 

13. 9월 25일

1
25th. Monday.Chicago
 
2
A bright morning. Spent the a.m. in Parliment of Religions. Rev. Cantlin gave an able paper on the importance of union of the Church for missionary enterprizes. Dr. Schaff, the great Church historian, presented a worthy paper on the reunion of Christian churches.
3
Dr. Allen and Miss Mary Allen and Lilian Bonnell left Chicago at 10. Bade them farewell at 7. Was moved to seethe old soldier of the cross leave family and home with such cheerfulness. Then his noble girl! God bless her. Was really sorry to see Miss L.B. leave this happy country against her will.
4
Spent about two hours pleasantly in playing the game of quotations with Miss Margaret Hutchinson, the pretty daughter of landlord.
5
This morning I heard a man, a Christian minister, talk about getting up a platform on which every religion with all its shades and extremes could stand. What a nonsense! If bigotry can see but one phase of a truth, extreme broadness can't see anything save the surface of the whole.
 

14. 9월 26일

1
26th. Tuesday.Chicago
 
2
Buddhists had their day or rather their night. The whole platform was occupied by priests of Buddhism, of Shintoism, and of the many isms of India. The Japanese priests with the exception of one whom the Chicagoans dubbed with the title of "Rt. Rev. Archbishop" of Buddhism (!) looked mean and plebian to the lowest degree. Knowing as I do the private life of a Buddhist priest in Japan I was tickled to hear Dr. Barrows and others call the Buddhist monks pure and holy men(!) .
3
Mr. Hirai, a Japanese free thinker and scholar, read the best paper in the evening. The style was beautiful; and the thoughts, expressed as they were in vague and metaphysical terms, caught the audience. The paper was however morally useless on account of its fallacies. He advocating a synthetic religion defined religion as an "apriori belief in an unknown entity". Then he proceeded to consider the nature of the unknown entity. "Nonsense!" For if the entity is "unknown" how can we consider its nature?
4
He tried to show that the creator of conditioned and finite beings could not be infinite and unconditioned. He might as well have said that the maker of unintelligent dolls can't be intelligent!
5
In closing Hirai compared all religions to R.R. trains. "Christ" said he, "is only a brakesman. Don't mind him. Tear up the Bible: God is not in it. You are in God." He might as well tell a passenger to kick the captain overboard and tear up the chart that have carried him and others safe over the stormy sea. Will this philosopher (fool-o-so-pher) of Synthetic Religion advise a traveler to smite the engineer and break the rails that have enabled him and other to traverse plains and mountains in safety.
6
All this tomfoolery was received with applause.
7
It is a fact noticeable that all the non-Christian creeds present a united front to Christianity. Unitarians and Universalists in their hatred for orthodoxy go rather with Buddhism. Dhamapala, an Indian Buddhist, preached (?) in a Universalist Church.
8
One of my objections to the ultra-liberal sects of Christianity is their ultra-indefiniteness. Religion is at best a matter of faith―a mystery on which many a struggling soul sighs for more light. An ultraliberalist adds to the mystery which invites doubts, that indefiniteness which cools zeal.
 

15. 9월 27일

1
27th. Chicago.
 
2
From 6 p.m. the doors of Art Institute were besieged by eager crowds. As the doors didn't open until 9 p.m. the crowd and crush were almost intolerable. In the midst of the throng it was impossible to move a step. On account of the great attendance the closing exersises of the Parliament of Religions were duplicated, one in the Hall of Columbus and the other in Washington Hall. The Appolo Club under Prof. Tomlins with its four hundred voices occupied the galleries of the Hall of Columbus. The music was the grandest of the sort I have ever heard. The addresses were short and most of them to the point.
3
Dr. Momery of London led the way. He congratulated Dr. Barrows to whom the success was largely due; America for leading the way to the establishment of a universal religion; Chicago for having the best exposition yet held in the world.
4
Mozoonda. "When man unites with man it is unity with God".
5
A Russian prince―a very handsome young man. "Americans think Russians are brutes; and Russians think Americans are angels. Once in a while the brutes and the angels come together only to be mutually undeceived. As long as politics and politicians exist there will be no happiness in the world". etc.
6
Harai of Japan talked about the Japanese priest's shedding tears for leaving America. I call this an Asiatic lie pure and simple.
7
King of China. "I ask all the religious people of America to treat my countrymen as kindly as you have done me".
8
The Shinto priest of Japan invoked the blessings of his 8 million deities on the people of America.
9
Cantlin of China. "I have been trying to find out the etymology of the name of your city. Whatever be its origin, English or French or Indian, it certainly has a 'go' in it". etc. etc.
10
Dharmapala of Ceylon said that a few jarring words (referring to the Pentecost's attack on Hindoo religion) had made the general harmony sweeter by contrast.
11
An African prince―coal black but intelligent young man. He said that Africa sustains a peculiar relation to the Parliament of Religions etc. etc.
12
Bonney, the President of the Congress. "Not unto me, not unto me, not unto me but unto God and all the pure and good women and men all over the world is due the success of the Parliament" etc.
13
Gandi, a Bombay lawyer. "Do I wish a Hindoo or a Buddhist turn a Christian? God forbid! Do I wish a Christian turn a Hindoo or a Buddhist? God forbid!" Thus in the very name of liberty, toleration etc. etc. this man forbids the freedom of choice.
14
Boardman of Philadelphia. "Fathers of the contemplative East! Sons of the executive West! Behold how pleasant it is for bretheren to live together in peace!"
15
Dr. Hirch, a Jew, read a rather long paper on universal religion etc. etc.
16
Dr. Bristol, the best known Methodist preacher in the city. "Since the Parliament opened, little things have been diminishing while great things have been growing. May the blessings of God and of our Savior, the great teacher of brotherhood of men, go with you!
17
Jones, the secretary of the Congress. "I would rather be the doorkeeper in house of the Lord than to dwell in the tent of bigotry."
18
A Spanish pastor referred to the fact that Spain has been downtrodden for centuries by ecclesiastical oppression. But he was reminded by the Chairman not to go on that line.
19
Women speakers Mrs. Howe, Chapman etc.
20
Bishop Arnett was introduced with the remark that he would answer the question "Is Negro a man?" The audience was enthusiastic in cheers, in waving handkerchieves etc. The witty colored man began by saying "Ladies and Gentlemen, I think your cheers have answered that question."
21
Bishop Keane of Catholic church said that the old church was only too glad to attend the Parliament.
22
The Parliament was broken up with the Lord's Prayer by Rabbi H. and a benediction by Bishop K. 11 a.m.
 

16. 9월 28일

1
28th. Chicago
 
2
After breakfast went into the Fair. Felt humiliated not to find a Corean flag in any of the buildings from whose roofs fly the colors of almost every nation. Ah! yet I shall not know the depth and breadth of the degradation and shame of Corea till I get into her capital.
3
The buildings whose magnificent architectural feats charm me beyond expression will in course of a month or two be leveled to the ground. Oh! vanity of vanities! One reason why they have to go is that their material will not stand the weather. He who builds his character on anything short of God may take a lesson from this.
4
Went to the Corean Pavilion at 11 a.m. and stayed there until 5 p.m.! Why and what for? I can't explain; only I couldn't get away from there, miserable as the exhibit is. Mr. An, one of the Coreans, having charge of the exhibit is a fair specimen of the degraded humanity of Corea. He is dirty, lazy, dull, filthy in mouth and in morals. Mr. Chung, the chief commissioner, is said to be stingy and bigotted. Mr. Pak is the best of the whole lot. He knows that Corea is in a pitiful condition.
5
The weather for the day or two past has been chilly and disagreeable. Trees already shed their brown leaves.
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