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◈ 윤치호일기 (1894년) ◈

◇ 3월 ◇

해설목차  1권  2권  3권 4권  5권  6권  7권  8권  9권  10권  11권  12권  윤치호

1. 3월 3일

1
3rd. (二十六) Saturday. A week of unusal (or rather usual in this season of the year) coldness and wet spell.
 
2
Reveled in the brilliant pages of Prescott's Conquest of Mexico.
3
The Saturday night prayer meeting was held in Mr. Reed's parlor. The inclemency of the night kept many away from the meeting. Mr. Thompson, an Episcopalian missionary of most loveable character and sincere piety, let the meeting. He spoke of the rich treasure a Christian has in the blessings which Christ gives―peace, power and rest. Enjoyed the meeting very much.
4
Received two letters from my darling in answer to mine.
5
My teacher told me that it is reported among the Chinese Christians that I have had an interview with 秀珍 and a long talk too! They say that this was done through the help of Miss Haygood who, taking me to the room where 秀珍 was playing on the organ, left usalone to ourselves. I wish she did!
 

2. 3월 8일

1
8th.(二月初二) Thursday. Snowed last Saturday night to a respectable depth. Rain ever since.
 
2
Accidentally met Higuchi(桶口) , a Japanese friend, whom I had known 6 years ago in the A.C.C. Both of us were glad enough to meet once again. Called on him at the Hotel of Japan (東和洋行) . He told me that he had visited Corea last year; that he was perfectly disgusted with the miserable condition of the people; and that I ought never to return there. He further informed me that he had learned from Mr. 李德鄕, 4 or 5 years ago, of the―of my mother! He then said to his friends at the table "We can all sympathize with a friend for his bereavement of mother, but I can not think of the loss of Mr. Yun without tears. To any other young man we might say you; must endure hardships! But to Mr. Yun who has been doing that for ten years, we have no heart to say so. All I can say to you" he turned to me, "is take care of your health and be patient!" I was very much moved by these kind and manly words.
3
Higuchi is a typical Japanese―fearless, neat, and sensitive. He is also unusually frank and direct. He asked me if I did not want to go into business and make money. He left for Tientsin where he has a store.
4
If H.'s report be true, the―of my dear mother must have occurred soon after I went to America! How sad! Where is my cherished hope that I might one day make her happy in my love and devotion! Oh, what I would not give to see her once more and to drink in her tenderness!
5
At 9 went into the C.I.M. chaple to hear the addresses of Mrs. Andrews and Dr. Bushnel who have been traveling for three years in the interest of the W.C.T.U. The talks were informal and spiritual.
 

3. 3월 9일

1
9th.(三) Friday. No rain for the first time in nearly two weeks. No sun either. Yet the signs of the times are for a fair weather.
 
2
At 5:30 Miss Haygood and Richardson came to put the furniture in order in the bedroom of my new home. It is very good of the ladies.
3
Wrote to Mrs. Candler, Miss Fonzie, Revs. Lee and Cuminggin, Mrs. Hoss, and to sister Herter.
 

4. 3월 11일

1
11th. Sunday.
 
2
Dined (or tiffined) with Dr. Allen. Spent the p.m. with him. He denied the story of his love affair he is said to have had, when young, in Starsville, Ga.
3
Looked over the Confucian presentation read in the P.R. by the secretary of the Chinese legation at Washington. However, the Chinese text, intended for the celestial literati, (and which I read this p.m.) is said to be quite different from the English translation. In the Chinese copy the writer shows as much cheek as may be expected from a Confucianist.
4
1. He denies the charge that China has no religion.
5
2. He praises Confucianism sky-high.
6
3. With a Confucianistic indifference and conceit he put Tao-ism, Buddhism and Christianity all on the same plane, harmless indeed, yet inferior to Confucianism.
7
4. He makes a sensible reader nauseate by his miserable adulation on the Empeoror Kankee as the 4th of the Three Kings and the 6th of the Five Emperors!!! Now, he knows he lies!
8
5. He thinks that the wealth and prosperity of a Christian nation are against the teachings of Christ who tells his followers not to lay up treasures on the earth. What a fool! Can he pretend that Confucius or Mencius or any other great teacher ever taught and inculcated mammonism? Christianity puts man above nature. It makes a man free in mind and in imaginations and in the exercise of his native powers. He uses natural agencies as their lord but not worships them as a slave. Hence a Christian nation becomes wealthy. The writer might as well blame a man for becoming healthy by following the laws of hygiene as to blame a people for becoming prosperous by obeying the teachings of Christ.
9
6. He condemns the propagandism of missionaries as it implies that they look upon other religions with contempt. Well, this is rather pardonable in a Confucianist. It would be too much to expect the secretary of the Imperial Chinese Legation at Washington to understand the significant difference that Christ commands his disciples to go and teach, while Confucians say: Come and learn. I say that this is a significant difference; because a Christian deems it his duty to impart whatever good he has or knows, while a Confucianist keeps it to himself for selfish pride or benefit. I appeal to the absolute lack of public spirit in a Confucian country for the verification of my statement.
10
7. The writer thinks that Confucianism is better than any system because it deals with such things alone that can be understood by the commonest mortal. He thinks or rather affirms, that the duties of the five relations as set forth by Confucius are supreme. O, well, it is all right for him to defend or exalt his religion. But to me this exalting of the commonest virtues, as filial love, parental affection etc. etc. into the highest obligations, is the weakest point in Confucianism. After all, in what respect is a Confucianist a better father or a better son than a Christian? Only in this: the former mourns three years when his parents die and abstains from public business in order to worship the dead; while the latter, hoping to meet the beloved souls in heaven, works all the more earnestly and piously in order to support the living. Concerning the duty between the Prince and the Subject―well, I know too well what this duty means―this fatherhood(?) of the Prince and the sonship of the Subject. The relation between a Confucian pair―the relation of despotism on the part of the husband and of slavery on that on the wife. A five thing to brag about!
11
8. The gentleman attempts a little of the exegesis of a Christian text. He says Christians ought not to worship in the public in promiscuous congregations because, forsooth, Christ in one place, enjoys private devotions in a closet!
 

5. 3월 12일

1
12th.(六) Monday. A beautiful day.
 
2
In the evening I wrote the following letter to Miss Laura Haygood, every word from my heart:
3
"Your favor of this date accompanying the invitations have just been received. I am ashamed of myself for having imposed on you the burden of sending out the invitations. I had not the least idea that you would write them with your own hand.
4
"As I read over the invitation I can not help feeling serious and prayerful. This is one of the most important steps I have taken in my life. What wealth of tenderness, of sacredness, of solemnity in this world of marriage! It means the unhappiness or happiness of a home. It means the failure or success of two lives. It means the ruin or perfection of two characters. It, in short, seals the destinies of two immortal souls either for ill or for weal. I only pray that God may bless her and me in the union.
5
"It is my fondest hope that Sieutsung may, in the providence of God, give me a home in the Christian sense of the word. In that home you shall be enshrined in the grateful love of your affectionately." T.H.Y.
 

6. 3월 14일

1
14th.(八) Rained most of the day.
 
2
The Chinese says that on this day the daughter of 張大帝 is married to a young god in...and that the god 張 sends rain and wind because he loves frozen dog meat.
3
The old teacher is a wonderful man; eighty-six years old, he is as vigorous in mind and senses as a young man. He does not forget the names of even new boys.
4
A preacher who emphasizes the miracles of our Lord to a Chinese audience independently of their connections, simply as a display of the divine power, commits a serious blunder. The Chinese legends and superstition are so full of miracles that a sensible man who rejects them will smile at those of Christ as equally absurd; while the ignorant who swallows all the Chinese stuff will see nothing remarkable in the wonders performed by your Savior. So far as I am concerned I never expect to preach or preach about the miracles of the New T. unless I were able to show beyond doubt that they are not of the same kind as the puerile wonders said to have been wrought by heathen gods and Buddhas.
5
The Shanghai magistrates have issued a proclamation calling upon all loyal subjects to be ready to make as much noise as possible to scare away the monster who is expected to swallow the moon on the 21st inst. When a bright skeptic appears many a good-hearted people try to make as much noise as possible to scare him away from his attempt at swallowing up our Faith. So the Chinese have many imitators.
 

7. 3월 17일

1
17th.(十一) Saturday. A pretty day. New Home.
 
2
Spent the whole p.m. in moving my books etc. from the A.C.C. to the New Home.
3
At 7 p.m. to McTyeire Home to lead the prayer meeting. This being the last meeting before Miss Haygood starts for America, the prayers offered, hymns sung, and remarks made partook the nature of a farewell service. The good old hymn, "How firm a foundation", the favorite song of Miss Haygood, gave her the occasion of making some beautiful remarks on the goodness of Providence. "My young bretheren and sisters" said she, "during the nine years of my service in China, I have found all the promises of God true. Fear not, then, just as your days demand, shall His strength be your supply". She is one of those women who compels your respect and love without any effort and inspite of your will.
4
Received a note my 'Darling'. She tells me that she has decided to have the ceremony performed in English. Sweet thing! I wonder what made her to come to that decision.
5
A beautiful night―biting cold―though. Rode home in the company of Prof. and Mrs. Bonnell.
6
Some want me to keep my foreign dress on; others insist on my putting on the Chinese paraphernalia. To please both parties I may have to get some fig leaves!
 

8. 3월 19일

1
19th.(十三) Monday. A pretty day.
 
2
At 5 p.m. Miss Helen Richardson and Mrs. Bonnell came to see the room and to decide the best possible position of the several articles of furniture. Like a certain temperance society where one single lady had to be the president, secretary, treasurer and the member, our little room has many offices to fulfill.
3
Our Chinese servant is a neat looking old woman. She seems to have no idea about cleanliness or orderliness. She talks much as the result of habit rather than as that of thought. Indeed sometimes I wonder if she thinks at all.
 

9. 3월 20일

1
20th.(十四) Tuesday. A pretty day.
 
2
At 5 p.m. called on Miss Haygood. She told me to erect a family altar at once; to see to it that Sieutsung might make herself useful in instructing such of her neighbors as might be gathered; to attend the McTyeire Home Saturday prayer meetings with her as often as possible, and to decide the dress question prayerfully and carefully. God being my help, the spirit, if not all the letter, of this motherly advice shall not be lost on me. After consulting with Miss Haygood, the Chinese ritual was voted to be preferable to the English.
3
One of the boys in my room sent me a dolly for the wedding present,―a singular but a seasonable gift. Messrs. 曹 and 楊, the two Chinese teachers of the College, sent me some scrolls and two bundles of peanuts.
 

10. 3월 21일

1
21st.(十五) Wednesday.
 
2
In the morning Mrs. Bonnell and Miss Richardson came to put things in proper order in the house. I thank them most sincerely. The room is furnished almost entirely by the substantial presents of the ladies of the Mission. The rocking chair which Miss Hughs has given to Sieutsung is more American than anything else. When I sold off my 'rocker' in Oxford, I had no dream of having one out here. Every token of kindness given me by the ladies is a reminder that I must be worthy of their friendship and expectations.
3
At 5 p.m. got ready for the ceremony. About half an hour later my Chinese paraphernalia was completed. Went to McTyeire Home with Prof. Bonnell. At 6, was accompanied into the parlor by Prof. Bonnell. The folding door being pushed aside, the dining room was thrown open to accommodate the guests. Ladies sat in the dining room and gentlemen in the parlor.
4
I stood on the right of Prof. Bonnell about 3 minutes when Miss Haygood led Sieutsung in and placed her by my side. The ritual was simple and the whole ceremony was beautifully performed. When our hands were joined, the effectionate grasp showed me that she had her heart in the union. God bless both of us to each other! The ritual over, the folding door was closed; and the guests were sorted, as it were, according to their sexes. Among the gentlemen there were Dr. Allen, Prof. Bonnell, Bro. L., Mr. McIntosh, Mr. Collyer, and Mr. 上田關太郞. The old Chinese teacher was the most welcome guest among the Chinese.
5
My 'Darling', dressed in pink looked lovely indeed, and deserved all the praises she got. After refreshments the visitors went away one by one. Just before the carriage came for us, Miss Hughes told me in Miss Haygood's parlor with a deal of emotion, "Mr. Yun, you must be good to my dear girl. I love her just as my sister. And now I love you as my brother." About 8, the carriage came. Miss Haygood led Sieutsung to her study where I was; and for the first time the bride and I looked full at each other's face. As the dear creature stood by Miss Haygood with one of her pretty hands in Miss Laura's, her sweet and childlike smile and confidence were in harmony with the almost parental love and pride with which the good missionary looked up on her pupil. On parting, Miss Haygood embraced the bride; and, printing several affectionate kisses on the latter's forehead and cheek and lips, she pronounced on the bride the benedictiom, "God bless you, my child". As Sieutsung and I came out from the study side by side Miss Haygood, out of her great heart, said "God bless you both!" Just outside of the door of the hall, the ladies of the Mission and the girls of the school stationed themselves on both sides and showered rice on us. When we got into carriage, all I could do was to hold her willing hands, pressing them with mine as warmly as newly married love could.
6
On our arrival at home, we found Prof. and Mrs. Bonnell waiting for us. The Rubico is crossed.
 

11. 3월 22일

1
22th.(十六) Thursday. Rained all day.
 
2
At 5:25, Bro. Loehr and I started for Rev. Thompson's home where we were invited to a feast prepared by my "Darling's" parents. When we got there in the rain, there was no sign for a feast. Had to wait until 7:30 before the feast made its appearance. I was agreeably surprised to see that Messrs. T. and L. seemed to enjoy the Chinese eatables almost as much as the native guests. Having left my heart with my "Darling" at home, I didn't care anything for the feast except for its end. The feast was eminently Chinese in three characteristics. 1st―The waiting: two hours. 2nd―The absurd tho necessary(?) delay and noise which the offer and refusal of the seats of honor caused. 3rd―Light dishes before heavy and rich food.
3
At 9 the feast came to an end to my infinite delight.
 

12. 3월 27일

1
27th.(卄一) Tuesday.
 
2
At 6:30 received a notice from Mr. 吳葆仁 informing me of the arrival of Mr. K.O.Q. at Shanghai and desiring me to call on the latter in the Japanese Hotel 東和洋行. After supper went to the Hotel and was glad to meet them, viz. Mr. K.O.Q; his personal servant, a Japanese; Mr. 吳, the interpreter of the Chinese Legation at Tokio: and Mr. 洪鍾宇, a Corean whom I had met at Tokio.
3
Mr. K.O.Q. told me that he had come to visit China at the invitation of Li Hong Chang's son: that Messrs. 福澤 and 後藤 gave him1,000 each for the expenses; that Mr. 李世植, whom he met in Osaka, gave him600 to defray the traveling expenses of the party; that Mr. 洪 was sent here by Mr. 李 with Mr. K.O.Q. in order to draw5,000 out of a Chinese bank 小東門外天豊寶號 where Mr. 李 has money deposited; that out of this five thousand dollars,2,000 were to be given to Mr. K.O.Q. while the balance was to be sent back to Mr. 李 through 洪. When I suggested that 洪 might have been sent as a spy, Mr. K.O.Q. answered. "But then, he has nothing to spy. He seems to know everything. I don't trust him, however."
4
Mr. K.O.Q. said that he intended to stay in Shanghai until a further notice from Mr. 李敬邦 who is now at 燕湖. Mr. K.O.Q. gave me the startling news that 河龍國 died at Tokio early last week!
 

13. 3월 28일

1
28th.(二十二) Wednesday. A pretty day.
 
2
Received a letter from 李健赫, informing me in one line that 天綾兩處 皆安寧. That he did not sign the brief note shows the attitude of the Government toward me.
3
A very nice letter from Mr. Nagami asking me to send him a temperance pledge that he might have some excuse for not drinking at a social party. He also sent me two beautiful jubilee stamps issued lately in honor of the 25th anniversary of the Imperial marriage.
4
Mr. K.O.Q. wrote me to come this p.m., but the College duties kept me from complying with the request.
5
At 4:30 a note from 東和洋行 reached me saying that a 大急變起リ 至急來東. I at once guessed at the import of the affair that Mr. K. had either been seized a prisoner or assassinated. Prof. Bonnell kindly consented to accompany me to the Hotel. On our arrival we were informed that 洪鍾宇 has shot Mr. K. and fled! The remains of the victim was laid on a rattan lounger. The bloody sight was singularly dreadful. So K.O.Q. is dead at last! The affair having taken place in a Japanese hotel, the Japanese officers held an inquest over the body!
6
As for the why of the thing it is needless to say that K.O.Q. was baited over here to be gotten rid of. The affair happened between 4 and 4:30 p.m.
 

14. 3월 29일

1
29th.(二十三) Thursday. A beautiful spring day.
 
2
About 3 p.m. 洪鍾宇 was captured near Woo Song.
3
Wrote to Miss Fannie and Nagami san.
 

15. 3월 30일

1
30th.(二十四) Friday. A beautiful day.
 
2
After a week's trial, the Chinese costume as expensive, inconvenient, and inexpedient, has to be given up for the time being at least. My 'Darling' gives me consent to assume my former attire.
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◈ 윤치호일기 (1894년) ◈

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