VS 여러분! 반갑습니다.    [로그인]   
  
키워드 :
  메인화면 (다빈치!지식놀이터) :: 다빈치! 원문/전문 > 기록물 > 개인기록물 영문  수정

◈ 윤치호일기 (1895년) ◈

◇ 8월 ◇

해설목차  1권  2권  3권  4권  5권 6권  7권  8권  9권  윤치호

1. 8월 5일

1
5th. (15th of 6th Moon). Monday. A hot day but sunny.
 
2
Am glad to see the sun once more after a full a full week of torrential rains days and nights.
 
3
This and that and all:
4
1. Count Inouye has adopted a very different program in his Corean policy. "Non interference" is his watchword. He told me the other day that he has been trying and would try his best to disperse the cloud of suspicion that envelops T.M. He, in two interviews which he has had since his arrival, told T.M. that they ought to trust their servants etc. etc. But the Count may go on forever in that strain without effecting any good. He would be no more successful in persuading Her Majesty to be patriotic, unselfish, merciful and just than he could be in moving the Namsan. All things considered, it seems that Inouye's sole object is to manage Corean affairs so as to avoid conflict with Russia for the time being―until Japan may feel strong enough to defy that great power.
5
2. The Treasury Department which has always fluctuated between "Nothing to eat and just half enough to eat" is now rapidly becoming hopelessly empty. After the loan of3,000,000, was effected a reserve fund of500,000, was set aside. But of this fund only about60,000 are now left, the bulk of the reserve having been spent (or wasted) in equipping and maintaining over 3,500 engineer corps (工兵) . Every cent spent in the War Department is every cent wasted to my mind. Why? Because one and all of the so-called soldiers who are fed on the people nothing but a gang of thieves and cowards perfectly and absolutely useless in time of need. I wish all the money used in this form foolery were spent in establishing primary schools and in maintaining them throughout the country. The education of children between 6 and 15 is the only hope for Corea.
6
3. For the past few weeks the whole town of Seoul has been very much scared by the presence of Cholera. The Corean government has invited the foreign (Japanese included) doctors in Seoul to form a Board of Health. Rules after rules have been published in the name of this worthy body for the preventive and curative measures against the disease. But a regulation or a rule can not work itself. With the miserable police force and the ignorant and dirty and poor populace, one can no more expect to carry out the sanitary measures than he can fly. As an instance of the impracticability of the rules under the present condition of things: The other day one of our servants had the attack of bowel trouble which everybody took to be cholera. I sent a boy to report the case to the nearest police station for some help. The messenger went to the Middle District Station, which sent him to the Northern District Station, which told him to go to a General Division Station (番所) , which sent him to the Central Police Department, which told him to run to the Home Department, which sent him to the Hospital (惠民社) . When he got there, the worthy policemen told him to go home and come back with the name of the patient! Could anyone help cussing the whole thing called the Corean government?
7
4. Corea is now practically lawless country. There is no way getting one's grievances redressed. The worthy gentleman Soh Kuang Pom, who uncommonly smart (in his own conceit) laid aside the old laws of the land (which can and did do summary justice to rogues and vagabonds) without having enforced new laws for the protection of the life and property of the community. Nobody, however just his cause may be, dares go to the court, for the simple reason that he can not afford to waste time, money, and patience in trying to get the gang of officiated snails to enforce the backboneless laws. At the same time these snails play snakes enough whenever they can squeeze money out of someone's pockets. Nobody dares lend money to or make contract with another solely because in case the latter fails to keep his word the former has no means to make him to.
8
5. The dishonesty and ingratitude of a Corean servant especially a "Mafoo" is something astounding. Faithlessness in all classes has damned and is damning this wretched country.
9
6. The Minister of Education李完用 is reported to be busy in setting up a printing press (Corean types to be used) in his Department. When I was in the Department I used all my influence to keep down this miserable scheme; for this Education Department needs no more setting up an expensive but useless press than Corea needs having a Mint.
10
7. Our darling Baby is growing prettier and sweeter every day. She is a comfort to us. My precious Darling stands the weather tolerably well. Her natural sweetness and her devotion to me go far to make up what comforts she misses here.
11
8. So after all, Japan has practically failed to reform Corea. The fault is of the Corean government, however, and not of Japan. One may lead a donkey to a stream but he can not make it drink.
12
9. Yet, has Japan always acted up to her profession of disinterested friendship for Corea? No! During the months past, Japan has never shown in acts the least concern for the real interest of Corea. Let her miserable tricks in the loan and diplomatic sharpers speak for their own shame. Japan has tried and is trying to grab at every thing that may benefit her, however her encroachment may injure Corea.
 

2. 8월 11일

1
11th. (21st). Sunday.
 
2
Last night by the direct order of His Majesty, the following changes were made in the Cabinet. Minister of War安駉壽, Superintendent of Police李允用, Minister of Finance沈相薰, Vice Minister of War勸在衡, Secretary of Cabinet李聖烈, Vice Minister of Finance李鼎煥.
3
It would be amusing, if it were not sad to see the fickle changes in the Corean Cabinet. There is no hope for progress and reform. The old order of thing is gradually coming back. How long will it last?
4
The principal cause of P's failure was his exceeding narrowness. This gave birth to suspicion, obstinacy and love of undue secrecy. Cold heartedness was another of his weaknessess. His treatment of (Nay, all of) his few real friends was outrageously cold. I am told that he once suspected me of a fatal scheme against him! Patriotism was his redeeming quality.
 

3. 8월 16일

1
16th. (26th). Friday.
 
2
Began the study of French with Father Charge-beuf. The condition of the Corean affairs is daily growing unsatisfactory. The appointing power being in the Royal grasp, all the posts of importance are one filled by persons whose only merit is their skill in squeezing money out of the poor people to gild the Royal Coffers. As this wretched country has touched the bottom of moral, mental, and political degradation, nothing can make its streets and hovels filthier, its officials more corrupt, its people more ignorant, its literati more arrogant and more false. Corea, socially and politically, can never go worse. This is sad. But sadder it is that Corean regeneration at any near future is hopeless.
3
Generals Le Gendre and Dye, two useless Americans are fattening themselves on high salaries for doing nothing. So far as rascals are concerned Corea could certainly do amply without importing any from abroad.
4
Mr. Kim Yun Sick, the President of F.O., is an intelligent, kind and well meaning old man. But being weak he is easily led by others. His private secretary Yuk Chong Yun, who leads him by the nose is a sneaking fellow for whom I have a great contempt.
 

4. 8월 17일

1
17th. (27th). Saturday. As hot as yesterday.
 
2
At 8:30 p.m. Prince Uihwa called on me. He is a bright youth of 18. His delicate and dangerous situation has made him prudent and watchful. He seems to have a large share of the kind heartedness of his father. He is very anxious to study abroad. During Pak's administration he was appointed to be a special ambassador to Japan. But P. fled and the Prince got left. His Majesty seems to be unable to show his paternal affection to this son of his on account of his fear of certain personages.
3
Everybody who knows anything is anxious to get away from Corea, "No hope!" is the cry of all while, "Westward Ho!" is their watchword.
 

5. 8월 18일

1
18th. (28th). Sunday. A cool morning―hot day.
 
2
Attended to native service in the Methodist Chapel. Took tiffin with the ladies on the hill. Called on Dr. Allen. He was very sorry to hear that such a strong man as Mr. 魚 should be dismissed simply because he would not comply with the extravagant wishes of T.M. Had a long chat with Mr. Brown. He seemed to be in despair at the turn which the Corean affairs have taken. Backstair intrigues, corrupt flatterers, old abuses which are rapidly coming into full play in Corean politics too plainly indicate the approaching calamity of the country.
3
Called on Mr. Min Yong Tal 閔泳達 a progressive man in Min's family. He told me that he had no desire to stay in Seoul as his heart was made sick by the royal pardon so lately granted to the guilty Mins. I advised him to travel and that in Russia. For it is only a question of time that Russia will have a great deal of complicated relations with Corea. It would be well for Corea to have reliable persons to be acquainted with the condition and disposition of her great neighbor.
 

6. 8월 19일

1
19th. (29th). Monday. Very hot-cool both ends of the day.
 
2
Wrote to Bishop Hendrix asking him to take in Corea in his plan of visitation. Time very late in September or October.
3
Prince Uihwa wrote me that he had been relieved of his embassy to Japan, and that Yi Chai Soon had been appointed in his stead.
4
My cousin's wife and "another lady" left Chemulpo for Japan on the 18th inst. God bless them!
 

7. 8월 20일

1
20th. (1st of 7th Moon). Tuesday. A very hot middle-day.
 
2
Called on Min Young Tal. He told me that everything in the palace is as bad as of yore. T.M. are surrounded by detestable parasites and spies. Twenty-five young men, among whom 5 Mins, are to be sent at the expense of the government to travel through Japan and probably Europe.
3
Cholera is gradually going out of Seoul.
 

8. 8월 21일

1
21st. (2nd). Wednesday. Very cool in the early a.m.
 
2
The 4,000 soldiers (?) or 工兵 for the support of whom the greater part of the reserve fund has been wasted are nothing more than a serpent in the bosom. The government and the palace will find it out too late as soon as they are unable to pay their (soldiers) wages.
3
Japan seems to be anxiously waiting for the next breakout as her representatives are trying to help the palace to go its fatal way as fast as fate could carry it.
 

9. 8월 28일

1
28th. (9th). Wednesday. A day of sunshine and cloud.
 
2
From 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. stayed in the Palace, I being one of the committee to arrange the details for the big party going to be given to a large number of foreigners and native officials on the 4th of September, to celebrate the anniversary of the foundation of the present dynasty. This and that:
3
1. It seems that you can not do anything in Corea without much noise and crowd, though it is wonderful how little they do for all the noise they make.
4
2. Everything in the Palace is resuming the old habits of confusion, extravagance, though lesseness and changefulness. His Majesty is surrounded by clouds of favorites who try to keep up their business by all means of meanness―flattery, backbiting, intrigues and lies.
5
3. In a late conversation Ishitsuga (石塚) who, by the way, is the most upright man of all the Japanese advisors, said that he did not approve count Inouye's conduct; that such men as Saito and Shiotaru imposed on the Corean Government as advisers are unfit for their work; and that the Japanese representatives here even regret the wretched wrangles they had over the loan of3,000,000 last spring.
6
4. "Chun Choong Yi" (田中) is the Corean term for convict laborers. It came into the language this way:
 
7
About 14 years ago a Japanese contractor named Tanaka or 田中 came to Corea with a number of coolies who had his name printed on their short "Kimono." The Coreans taking the coolies to be the meanest order of the Japanese society, began to use the term (田中) as one of reproach and contempt. In the course of years the word had become naturalized when the convict labor system was introduced last year. Then at once people applied the term to the unfortunate whom the law clothes with blue dress with black stripes on.
8
5. Was informed by a reliable authority that Mr. P. had once actually suspected me as being one of the gangs who plotted against his life on Japan and that Mr. Fukuzawa succeeded in dissuading him out of this crazy notion only after much argument.
 

10. 8월 31일

1
31st. (12th). Saturday. Cloudy and warm.
 
2
From 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Palace, verified the storerooms containing sets of china etc. etc. and also the foreign house T.M. built two or three years ago. I was sick to see the expensive furniture all going to ruin from want of care. The Palace is full of lazy, no account fellows who do nothing but eat and sleep and steal. The rascals whose duty is to take care of a storeful of valuables etc. etc. etc. take everything except the care of them. No hope of reform until you have reformed the Palace.
3
The man who caters for General Dye and Colonel
4
Niensted in the palace makes a net gain of600 a month. The Colonel is reported to have said that he would rather be the caterer than a Colonel (His salary being300) sitting on the veranda in General D's quarters. Mr. Yi Hak Kuin(李學均) ordered some beer for General Le Gendre and Miss Sontag. I saw (and it made me mad to see) three big fellows coming with one bottle each, when one could have done so easily enough.
5
By the way Yi Hak Kuin, Pak Young Hwa (朴鏞和) are two of the most influential favorites of T.M.
◈ 영어독해모드 ◈
백과사전 연결하기
영어단어장 가기
▣ 인용 디렉터리
백과 참조
목록 참조
외부 참조
▣ 기본 정보
◈ 기본
윤치호 일기 [제목]
 
윤치호(尹致昊) [저자]
 
◈ 참조
1895년
 
▣ 참조 정보 (쪽별)

  메인화면 (다빈치!지식놀이터) :: 다빈치! 원문/전문 > 기록물 > 개인기록물 해설목차  1권  2권  3권  4권  5권 6권  7권  8권  9권  영문  수정

◈ 윤치호일기 (1895년) ◈

©2004 General Libraries

페이지 최종 수정일: 2004년 1월 1일