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◈ 윤치호일기 (1905년) ◈

◇ 8월 ◇

해설목차  1권  2권  3권  4권  5권  6권  7권  8권 9권  10권  11권  12권  윤치호

1. 8월 4일

1
4th.(4th of 7th Moon).Rain.
 
2
It was sunny and hot yesterday. Today rain. Last night dinner at the Bankers Club, given by the Dai-ichi Ginko. A large number of prominent men in the Financial world of Japan were present, besides the Vice Ministers of the F.O. and of the Finance Department.
3
Min Young Kui, the Minister of Finance, received a telegram from the Palace (Seoul) ordering him to return at once. Min Byong Suk, given to lies, intrigues and smoke, is a contemptible specimen of Korean Yang-bans. He loves lying and subterranean intrigues mostly childish for their own sake.
4
I do not think I shall enjoy staying in Tokio, for any length of time. Too many signs of contempt and slight and neglect on every hand.
5
Mr. Stevens is expected in Tokio in a few days. I wonder what he is coming again for, in so short a time. With all my respect for his ability and my liking for his friendship, I can not but feel that his position is an unenviable one―to be paid by Korea to do the work of Japan.
6
Mr. Brown has withheld the salaries and other allowances for the Korean Legation at Tokio for last ten months. This at the instigation of Hayashi, who wants to starve the Legation into withdrawal. Mean enough for a Japanese―but what shall I say about Mr. Brown who, as the paid (well paid, too) employee of the Korean Government, thus deliberately humiliates and disgraces the representatives of Korea, to please Japanese?
7
When Mr. Min Yong Whan was the Acting Prime Minister, some months ago, Hayashi actually told him that he (Hayashi) had persuaded Brown not to pay the salaries of the Korean Ministers abroad. Mr. Min said: "I hope my brother would starve to death than withdraw from Paris."
8
My Darling in Heaven: I once thought the attractions, novelties and excitements might disengage my mind from you, my everlasting Love, my precious Wife, my longed for Angel. But no! Not an hour passes without my realizing literally the touching sentiment expressed in the following lines:
 
9
"Wherever I roam, whatever realms to see,
10
My heart untravelled, fondly turns to thee;
11
Still to my Darling turns with ceaseless pain,
12
And drags at each remove a lengthening chain."
 
13
My love, to me no tragedly is sadder than your brave life and mournful death.
 

2. 8월 5일

1
5th. Sun-Hot.
 
2
By the 9 a.m. train, our party went to the famous Nikko, Arrived about 2:30 p.m. Put up at Konish Ya. Before 4 p.m. had to "do up" the famous temples. Our party too big and noisy and the sight-seeing too hurried. I did not enjoy it at all. In fact, I have no interest in these sight-seeings.
 

3. 8월 6일

1
6th. Cloudy.
 
2
Up at 5 a.m., and started for the 中禪寺 at 7. At the end of 4 hours of constant climbing, we got to the lake. A beautiful thing―worth all the trouble to see it. Lunch at the Komeya(米屋) , we climbed down. By the 4 p.m. train returned to Tokio, where we arrived about 10:30 p.m. The whole trip like a dream. I have the honor of being perhaps the only man who ever visited Nikko without buying some of the 101 pretty souvenirs. Absolutely indifferent.
3
The lake side must be an ideal summer resort. Nature and man have vied with each other to make Japan a fairyland in the Far East. If I had my choice to select a home, I should prefer Japan to any other country.
 

4. 8월 12일

1
12th. (12th of 7th Moon). Sun.
 
2
Since the day before yesterday, the weather has become very pretty. This week has been spent in enjoying the hospitality of the Japanese friends.
3
Japanese lunch at Baron Shibuzawa's beautiful villa in 王子, on the 7th.
4
Lunch given by O-Kura at his home on the 8th. His collection of Japanese, Chinese and Korean articles of five arts very beautiful.
5
On the 9th, at 10:30 a.m. we were granted an audience with the Emperor, the most fortunate sovereign in the world. He looked aged and puffy.
6
Lunch at 1 p.m. in the 興嶪銀行.
7
On the 10th at 12:30 had lunch at the Tokio Club with Mr. Stevens. He introduced me to two of his friends, Mr. Haywood and Mr. Swanzy the representatives of the Sugar Plantes Association.
8
At 4 p.m. our party went to the residence of the Finance Minister for dinner. Mr. Sone had four artists to paint on over 36 pieces of silk to be divided among the guests by lots. Katsura, the Premier was present.
9
Yesterday morning called on Mr. Stevens, who is now staying at Mr. Denison's house. He thinks Yi Yong Ik must be gotten out of the Palace by all means. He does not believe it true that the leading Japanese in Seoul have been taking bribes from the rascals whom they support. He is assured that neither Hayashi hor Hagiwara, nor Kokubu, take bribes, because the latter two gentlemen are so poor as a church mouse. Well Mr. Stevens is so fond of the Japanese that he can not see anything wrong in them.
10
Called on Mr. Swanzy in the lmperial Hotel. Found him a perfect gentleman in manner and conversation. He said that the planters are so much pleased with the Korean laborers that they (the planters) regret very much the suspension of emigration in Korea. When I told him that I would like to visit the Islands to study the question on the spot, he seemed so much interested that he proposed to defray my traveling expenses as the guest of his association.
11
Of course it is out of the question that I should accept the offer, since that would prejudice the Korean government against any report I may make, if at all favorable to the planters. If I had the necessary means I would visit the Islands without asking for a further sanction from my government. Mr. Stevens recommended me to His Majesty to be sent to Hawaii to investigate the condition of the Korean emigrants. On the 14th, ult., in the Cabinet, Mr. Sin Sang Hoon, the acting Prime Minister, told me to visit the Islands, in the presence of the Foreign Minister. So I have an ample authority to take the trip.
12
At 6 p.m. our party was invited by Mr. Tsinda, the Vice Minister of F.O. to a Japanese dinner in the 龜淸樓 next to the 雨國橋 on the 隅田川. The iron bridge, the shrill whistles of steam tugs, the noice and flash of the electric cars detract much from the picturesqueness of the place. The enchanting geisha in their beautiful and graceful dresses made the evening pass quickly. After dinner, had a boat ride on the river. I wish Korea were in a more hopeful condition. I would and could then have enjoyed the pleasures of Tokio hospitality. But the hopeless blackness of Korea's future and the shameful degredation in which Korea now stands in the eyes of the world make me too sensitive to enjoy anything.
 

5. 8월 25일

1
25th.
 
2
Has been raining for the last two weeks. Today is rained as usual. Nature may well weep on this day of sorrows and shame of the ill-starred Korea: the birthday of the Emperor of Tai-Han! Lunch in the Korean Legation. About a hundred or so Korean students in from all quarters of Tokio. There were some speechfyings. Minister Cho, in the course of his exhortations, somehow or other, broke down. The boys sobbed and wept―over the black hopelessness of Korea. Would to Heaven we had some reason―even one―to bless the day for!
 

6. 8월 28일

1
28th.
 
2
Last night, returning from the famous 茶療 of 赤扳公圓. where we had been invited by the 日宗 Life Insurance Company, I got a telegram from the Seoul F.O. about 12. It ran: "Proceed to Hawaii and Mexico. Transmitted 1,000 Yen to the Japanese Bank, Seoul."
3
Well I am glad I shall have one more month holidays. If I had an attractive home, or an attractive position in Soul, I would not care for going any further. But to return to the stinking place called 'house' in 典洞; and to resume the degrading duties in the F.O., under Yi Ha Yong, are two things quite distastful to me. I wish Father were a little more considerate and kind to me so that he might get a house more to my taste. He does not seem to care a rap for my comfort or happiness. Whatever I like is sure to meet with his disapproval.
4
Busy all day going about to get ready for my trip. Stevens said, "Oh never mind Mexico. Besides 1,000 Yen only 500 dollars U.S. gold―hardly enough for the Hawaiian trip."
 

7. 8월 29일

1
29th.
 
2
At 2.40 p.m. left Tokio. The party with whom I had come to Japan, and especially the three Ministers and General Cho, seemed really sorry to part with me. They all came to the station and bade me farewell.
3
Put up at 和田彦 inn.
 

8. 8월 30일

1
30th. Wednesday.
 
2
Went on board of the S.S. Manchuria at 11 a.m.
3
Weighed anchor at 4 p.m.
4
Well, good-bye to Japan for a month.
5
Of the 11 視察員 and their interpreters etc., Min Byong Suk and Min Yong Kui have made their careers-not enviable. Min Sang Ho is a very decent young fellow-but so cautious! Yi Kui Yong, the son of Prince Wan Soon, has very dirty habits, expectoration, loud talking, etc., but he seems to have a warm heart. Yu Chi Sul, the son of Yu Kui Whan, is in interesting to me from the fact in 1881 I came to Japan with him (Yu Yui Whang) as fellow students; that he was in 1895 only a Chusa, then Cham-soh when I was the Vice-Minister of Education; that he became one of the implacable enemies of the Indept. Club; that his intrigues etc. won the imperial faovr by which he was promoted by leaps and bounds; and that he was the Minister of F.O. when I was only the Kamni of Wonsan! He died some years ago and his son came to Japan with me as a fellow 視察員. How things change!
6
The man between whom and me I shall always take care to place a wide space is Chang Him Sik, the interpreter of Min Byong Suk. Chang affects the mannerisms of the Japanese and in constant grinning he out-Japaneses a Japanese. His cleverness, coupled. with his unprincipled and blushing lies, makes him a dangerous man. He is another Kim Ik Sung with greater polish―hence more dangerous. I hope I am mistaken, but I shall never trust Chang until I have some positive proof as to his reliableness.
7
Prince Wi-Wha came to Tokio yesterday evening. We went to see him this morning in a hotel in Chi-ki-Ji but he was 'absent'―a white lie:
8
O-ba(大匣) the agent of the 大陸侏式會社 came on board to see me off. I don't like him very much―too much cunning.
9
He told me that the 大陸會社 men are opposed to the Korean emigration to the Hawaiian Isiands, as that would interfere with the Japan's immigration, and that they would like to see the Korean emigration directed to countries―like Mexico, for instance―where Japanese are not found. I see from this little talk why the Japanese Legation in Seoul was so anxious to stop the Korean emigration.
10
O-Ba said that the 大陸會社 would gladly pay my expenses if I would visit Yucatan to correct the misreports about the treatment of the Korean laborors.
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