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◈ 윤치호일기 (1905년) ◈

◇ 7월 ◇

해설목차  1권  2권  3권  4권  5권  6권  7권 8권  9권  10권  11권  12권  윤치호

1. 7월 4일

1
4th.(2nd of 6th Moon). Foreign Office.
 
2
To My Darling Angel in Heaven:
3
Was not it on the 31st December last year-the birthday of Laura, that you-we-celebrated the birthdays of Allen and of Reid Candler together? I remember what a success you made of the Korean cake. Only a few days after that, you got ill. One evening when I returned home you told me that Reid Candler had done something naughty. I spanked him so severely that you took the boy in your arms and rubbed him and scolded me for being too hard on the little fellow. But, Darling, Oh! My love, whoever even dreamed that it was the last occasion when you should hold the boys in your arms in this world of pain and sorrow! Every time I look at Candler I am reminded of the scene and I can not help crying over it. My Precious Love, I think and say that the best thing that could have happened to a man or woman in this world is that he or she should never have been born.
4
On the 26th ult. Mr. Stevens left Seoul for Japan. I had not realized how much I liked him until I learned that the had gone. Without him I have no attraction in the Office. The Minister whom I despise, and his minions in the Office make my position very lonely and distasteful.
5
On that day, Mr. Edwin Morgan, the new U.S. Minister, paid his official visit to the Foreign Office. he brought me a letter from general Foote! That was a treat indeed. Yet how sad to think that Mr. Morgan is to be the last U.S. Minister, as general Foote was the first, to Korea.
6
Robbers are having a high time in Korea. No one who has an extra bag of rice is spared. These robbers are not destitute fellows who are driven to their business by starvation. They are well-dressed young fellows who have homes and concubines. Robbery and blackmailing have become a profession―most profitable and most secure. Some of the young men I know personally―who often eat our rice―are among the numbers. Yet nobody dares to denounce or inform against them, 1st: because their name is Legion, and 2nd: because there is no law in Korea. Everybody now in Korea―the Emperor, the Ministers, the magistrate, the Judge, the Korean, the Japanese is vying with each other in the nefarious work of grabbing the property of his weak neighbor. Each calls the other a thief and reascal, not because he is not one himself, but because the other fellow competes in his line of business. Korea is a rotten carcass upon which vultures of every nationality are busy feasting. Those who don't join the banquet are regarded as fools not only by the knaves but also by their parents and friends. The man who is most successful in deviltries is held up as a hero worthy of emulation, what Charlemagne or Napoleon is to the French, what Nelson or Gladstone is to the British, what Hideyoshi or Nan-Ko is to the Japanese, is Yi Yong Ik or Min Yung Chul to the Korean. No wonder corruption permeates every stratum of the Korean society, poisoning the blood of every man, woman and child.
 

2. 7월 10일

1
10th. Monday. From the 2nd inst., up to date we have had rain day and night. This morning a torrential rain for several hours. Steamy sticky and sickly.
 
2
The Gazette has been raining honorary―dishonorary Royal Imperial Grave keepers (參奉) and Imperial Private Secretaries (秘書承) . These titles have ticketed prices. A Grave keeper from ( ) to ( ) . The Private Secretary from ( ) to ( ) . To make an office thus an article of trade is (1) degrading the office: (2) disorganizing the work; (3) demoralizing the people.
3
Even if thers offices are not sold, these Gatling gun changes of their recipients are extremely puerile and scandalous.
4
The ( ) and his minions who waste their time in this scandalous childishness when the country is fast falling into pieces deserve no more respect than the dogs they eat-nay, less.
5
Yi Ha Yong has been making the titles of plenipotentiaries of Consul Generals, etc. as cheap as those of Grave Keepers. When I had charge of the office in May for a week or so I was ordered by His Majesty to appoint 朴供宗.
6
Resident Minister (辨理公使) and three other d―d rascals consuls and consul generals. I simply sent back the word that I could not obey the Imperial Order on the subject.
7
As soon as Yi Ha Yong came back to the Office all these men and lots of others were appointed Envoys Extraordinary, Minister plenipotentiaries, Consuls, Consul Generals, Secretaries to the Foreign Office etc. etc. all 借啣. By the way Yi Ha Yong is such a liar that he is most dangerous when he happens to tell a truth. I am simply sick of him and his relatives and creatures with whom he has filled the Office.
8
During the last ten days the Cabinet went through the following somersets.
9
On or about the 29th June, the Minister of Education, Pak Chai Soon, transferred from Law, Minister of Finance, Min Yong Chul, transferred from Household, Minister of Law, Min Yong Kui transferred from Finance, Minister of Agriculture, Yi Kun Taik.
10
The night before last.
11
Minister of Education, Min Yong Chul, Minister of Agriculture, Pak Chai Soon, Minister of Law, Yi Kun Taik, Minister of Finance, Min Yong Kui.
12
May all the Bosses and the slaves go to the everlasting fires and that right quick!!! But that's too good to happen in Korea.
 

3. 7월 12일

1
12th.
 
2
It is announced in the Gazette that Min Yong Kui, Min Byong Suk, Min Sang Ho, Cho Dong Yun, and myself have been appointed 視察員 or Inspectors (Sightseers) to Japan.
 

4. 7월 14일

1
14th.
 
2
Hayashi's farewell invitation to a luncheon at his Legation―our party and the ministers invited. At 6 p.m. farewell audience.
 

5. 7월 15일

1
15th.(13th of 6th Moon).
 
2
At 8:30 a.m. left Seoul per the S.T.R.R. Arrived Tai-Ku at 10 p.m. Met at the station by the new Governor Yi Kun Ho. Glad to see cousin Chi Byung and a captain of the local garrison.
3
Put up at the Governor's yamen to-ins, "Ki-Saings," emisquitor―all noise and fuss―Kisaings very ugly.
4
Our party composed of Min Yong Kui, Minister of Finance, Min Byong Suk, Director Decoration, Min Sang Ho, Privy Councillor, Cho Dong Yun, Aid-de-camp to His Majesty, myself.
5
Above five 勅任官Yi Dal Yong, Yi Bom Ku, Kim Song Un, Yi Kap, Jeun Yung Hun, Yu Chi Sul.
6
Altogether 11 in all. The followers of the above gents in one capacity or another, ―15―Grand total 26.
 

6. 7월 16일

1
16th.
 
2
Left Taiku at noon. Reached Fusan a little after 4 p.m. Wandering thoughts.
3
The Fusan R.R. is a success.
4
For over 300 miles the R.R. runs through an exceedingly fertile country. All along this distance, at each station not a Korean vendor of any kind allowed. Even the sellers of little refreshments are Japanese.
5
The names of the places along the R.R. are rendered in Japanese pronunciation. For example, 成歡 Sei-Kan instead of Sung Whan etc. The notices etc. all in Japanese.
6
All the way through Korean hovels are no better than mud holes-absolutely pitiful. In the night no light to be seen in a Korean home or a Korean village. Wherever a Japanese lives there are lights and cheer.
7
All the hills and mountains closely cropped. The fertile valley of the Naktong, through which the train runs, is beautiful and could be turned into a paradise.
8
Nature seems groaning under the tyranny of the Korean, who, like a spoiled child, abuses everything that comes within his power, but yields to everything that resists his feeble dominion. The Korean has cut down every tree because it is so easy to do it, but he has not dared to dam a wayward stream or the level a rock-bound pass, because he is too lazy or too timid to tackle the difficult problem.
9
Every inch of a railroad, every foot of a new road cut through rocks, every bridge over a thus far unbridged stream, every acre of waste reclaimed, every tree newly planted is in the hand of the Japanese a distinct asset to the world's progress. Nothing but the sentiment of a Korean will regret the adventure of the Japanese domination.
10
Put up at the Kamni's office.
 

7. 7월 17일

1
17th.
 
2
About 5 p.m. went on board of the 大禮排. Weighed anchor at ( ) a.m.
 

8. 7월 18일

1
18th. Rain a.m. clear p.m.
 
2
At 6 a.m., arrived at the entrance of Shimonoseki Rain and windy. A rough sea. Delayed by the examination of passengers by the quarantine officers. Went ashore about 11 a.m. To the 春帆褸 famous for having been the seat of the Shimonoseki treaty between Ito and Li Hong Chang.
3
The effect of the change from the prosaic Korean life to the poetic Japan is intoxicating to me. From a land where there is neither order, nor system, nor law, nor cleanliness, nor lights, nor pleasure, nor happiness of any kind to a country full of order and system and cleanliness and lights and pleasures and happiness. Everything so ugly in Korea―there man has disregarded, improved and glorified the charms of nature. Poor Korea!
 

9. 7월 19일

1
19th. Clear.
 
2
By the courtesy of the Customs, officers of Shimonoseki, a launch was put at our disposal. After tiffin we had a little excursion along the shore. Visited Moji. Everywhere order, neatness and life.
3
About 9:30 p.m. left Shimonoseki for Osaka.
 

10. 7월 20일

1
20th. Rain-until p.m.
 
2
Arrived at Osaka about 6 p.m.
3
Met at the station by the governor, the director of the Mint 長谷川, the Superintendent of Customs etc.
4
Put up at the Hanaya Inn.
5
The beautiful condition in which the streets are kept up, the well-lit shops and stores on every side, the stir and animation of the crowd, the politeness and cleanliness of the people, are simply charming. The more I think about it, the firmer grows the conviction that the sword and the bathtub are the father and mother of the Japanese civilization―The former keeps honor bright and the latter the mind clear.
 

11. 7월 21일

1
21st. Clear.
 
2
Remarkably cool in the morning and the evening. In the a.m. visited the Mint.
3
The Director informed us that a little over 600,000 Yen in nickel and 500,000 Yen in silver have been coined for the Korean Government. The Director entertained us at the Osaka Hotel to a lunch. The hotel has a fine location but a poor cuisine.
4
In the p.m. visited the Castle and the Arsenal. The latter establishment has now 20,000 workmen busy day and night.
 

12. 7월 22일

1
22ne. Clear.
 
2
At 8 a.m., the Director of the Tobacco Monopoly Bureau showed us around the tobacco factory. For me the factory has no interest, as I hate cigarettes. We were told that the Japanese spend Yen 60,000,000 on tobacco per annum.
3
By the 7:30 train, we left Osaka for Tokio.
4
Arrived in Tokio about 10 a.m. Mr. Cho Min Hui, our Minister, met us at 平沼 station. Went straight to our legation. After lunch Mr. Min Sang Ho and I put up at 西村星. Met my cousin and family.
 

13. 7월 24일

1
24th. Clear.
 
2
Cold in the morning and the evening. Dissatisfied at 西村星, we moved to the 金生館 where Mr. Min Byong Suk and Mr. Min Yong Kui stay.
3
The streets of Tokio have so changed that I can not recognize any place as I saw it 24 or 25 years ago. no end to pretty girls.
 

14. 7월 25일

1
25th. Cloudy.
 
2
At 2 p.m. our party called on the Premier Mr. Katsura. He recognized me, though it was in 1882-3 that he had seen me. What a memory.
3
From the Premier's house we called on the F.O. The Vice Minister, Mr. Dsinta appeared to me like a vulgar edition of Count Inouye. His manner was decidely insolent.
4
Miss Alice Roosevelt and Secretary of War, Taft arrived in Tokio. The whole Tokio is drunk with the spirit of welcome for the American visitors. Our insignificance is brought to a painful consciousness by the contrast. I am sick of it.
5
After supper called on my cousin and had a chat. He is a born politician. He talked to me about the political ups and downs of Tokio, but I cared no more about that than the politics in Neptune. Korea is gone and hopelessly gone. What do I care who is or will be the Premier of Japan O!
6
The sight of my cousin's wife recalling to my memory the incidents of my Darling's first experience in Korea filled my eyes with tears. O! my Love, but for the hope of resting myself on your blissful bosom in the course of time, the world would be dismal enough to me.
7
No sunshine since we came to Tokio. The climate must have something to do with the dull heaviness of my head sleepy all the time.
8
Not a filthy, abusive language used, even among the 'rickshaw' coolies. Who taught the 2 millions of men, women and children of this great city not to expectorate or spit in the street? Simply wonderful to a Korean who knows that these dirty and disgusting habits―noisy, abusive language and constant expectoration―are two of the 1001 abominations in Korea.
 

15. 7월 27일

1
27th. Cloudy.
 
2
Becomes steamy hot in the afternoon. 3 p.m. three Mins. General Cho, and I called on Marquise Ito. The old statesman seemed none the worse for the year and a half that has passed since I saw him last in Seoul. Mr. Min Byong Suk told the Marquise that he (Mr. Min) had been sent by his Korean Majesty to study the organization and working of the Cabinet and the Privy Council. Ito said:
3
"Very good. But new laws and new constitutions will not do your country any good as long as your Emperor does as he has been doing. A Prince may make laws but, once made, he must obey them."
4
Japan knows where the root of all evil is in Korea. Yet Japan will protect and strengthen that root in order to make the evil drive Korea into the tender arms of Japan. Whenever Japan rewards those who have served her faithfully the ( ) of K will or ought to, have a share none the less than her brilliant admirals and generals.
 

16. 7월 29일

1
29th. Steamy.
 
2
Visited two of the largest telephone connecting stations in Tokio. At 6 p.m. Japanese dinner at 紅葉館 by Furuichi, the Director Fusan R.R. Met Inouye Kakugoro, who took no pains to disguise his thorough contempt for Koreans. Said he to our Minister, Cho Min Hui;
3
"The four years of my experience in Korea have partly Koreanized me. Had Korea changed for the better, I would have been proud of being partly a Korean. But as Korea has changed for the worse, I am so ashamed of my Korean experience that I dare not let others know of it."
4
There was present Baron Shibuzawa, polite and jovial. Some pretty dances and dancers. For the gracefulness of movements, for the exquisiteness of taste, for the sweetness of voice and manner, for the lovelinese of hands, for the prettiness of face, the Japanese girls are unsurpassed and unsurpassable. But from their songs and music deliver me!
5
Inouye said that intemperance has gone out of fashion even among young men. He thinks the Japanese people have become more artificial. He may have used the word 'artificial' in the sense of polish, but I prefer to take the word in its common acceptation.
 

17. 7월 30일

1
30th. Sunshine.
 
2
Called on Dr. Nakamura, the son-in-law of Nakamura Kye-U, the president of 同人社, now defunct. Mrs. Nakamura seemed to be really glad to see me. She was never pretty even in her girlhood 25 years ago; but her homeliness is amply made up for by her kindheartedness.
3
Nakamura also told me that night-long carouses are so unfashionable nowadays that 料理屋 are in distress.
4
The agent of the 三非物産會社 in Seoul told Nakamura that the Ministers of the Korean Government used to come to him (the agent) always under the cover of darkness to negotiate terms for contracts etc; that they asked the agent to water the receipts, or to give them so-much commision; and that they begged him to speak of them disparagingly to their coleagues.
5
Tokio has changed all out of shape since I was in Nakamura's school. But 小石川 and its environments have retained some of its ancient landmarks. The little shop from which I used to get Japanese stationery, eggs and 葛粉 drinks is still there. The shop people recognized me, in spite of the long years that have passed.
 

18. 7월 31일

1
31st. Rain all day.
 
2
Visited the paper factory, the Government Printing Office etc. Twenty-five years ago I saw the paper mill. Korea had nothing of the kind then. Today I was again in O-ji, and boast of no paper mill in Korea. The only difference is that 25 years ago there was hope that Korea may learn; today even that hope is no more.
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